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A salute to Czech WWII fighter pilot heroes...

They do make movies the way they used to, only it's the Czechs who are doing it.

First we had "Kolya," which won director Jan Sverak an Academy Award in 1996; then we have Jan Hrebejk's "Divided We Fall," and now we have Sverak's newest film, "Dark Blue World."

The United States Army should use "Black Hawk Down" as a training film...

The United States Army should use "Black Hawk Down" as a training film. After 20 minutes’ viewing, a recruit would have a very good idea that being caught in a warlord-controlled Somalia town is indeed a life-threatening, bloody business.

You can't be on both teams at once...

I can hear reasonably well, and I love all things British, but Robert Altman's "Gosford Park" has tested the limits of my theatrical patience once again: his brilliant ability to film as if we were overhearing conversation at a party (remember "McCabe and Mrs. Miller" or "Nashville") leaves me wanting to be a listener who actually has heard all the conversation.

The plot holes are as many as dot our own moon...

Earth in 2079 is less secure than in 2002. Our hero, Gary Sinise, is a weapons inventor mistaken for a bomb-carrying alien. Let the chase begin. Most of this lost-opportunity sci/fi is based on a story by Philip K. Dick, better known for his plots of "Total Recall" and the seminal "Blade Runner."

Newfoundland just won’t give us its news gracefully...

That this affair may have precipitated the fall of Marie Antoinette and various other guillotine candidates is the most intriguing part of this "Dangerous Liaisons" wannabe.

Check out what we've been groovin' on all year...

Ali

Floats like a butterfly, stings like a bee...

"A Beautiful Mind" is the best exposition of the mind's ability to gyrate to a different tune since "Memento."

When Margot says of her first husband, "I met him in the ocean, he came out to me in a canoe," you know this is one weird family.

What were the best CDs of 2001? We have a few ideas!

Ian Britton

gListen Here.

To warm your heart and soul this upcoming holiday season, WCBE has once again lined up a stellar variety of music and entertainment programs.

These boys have a chemistry when they are together, not because of the cliched older /younger man motif, but because they obviously respect each other and enjoy the company.

Another "B" film enjoyable enough on a dark winter day but not great enough to outlast the endless conflict in an inscrutable Mid-East...

"O ye mortal engines, whose rude throats

Th' immortal Jove's great clamor counterfeit..."

It's so didactic, it's so moralistic, you might feel superior to Arthur Miller...

It's so didactic, it's so moralistic, you might feel superior to Arthur Miller, whose story about anti-Semitism in Brooklyn is a sledgehammer reminder that art with a message should at least go obliquely if not subtly. The Jewish grocer says with a straight face, "When you look at me, you don't see me." I think we get the point.

2001 - Disney/Pixar

Cleaning the environment of child contamination is a hilarious conceit that turns around the usual fears children have of monsters in closets.

No one in a literate, civilized society should miss this film --- it is a stunning fusion of sight, sound, and sense.

I know about teenage daughters, believe me --- rebel they will, and Scarlett Johansson's daughter Suzanne shows teen anguish and rebellion as authentic as could be.

Veteran editor Eva Gardos ("Mask") has her first directorial production with "An American Rhapsody." It's a story of a young girl's odyssey from Hungary to the U.S. in the 1940's, bouncing from her natal to adopted families with the help of her grandmother.

If you understood that "Seinfeld" was about nothing, then you will accept that "Vertical Ray of the Sun" is about almost nothing.

If you understood that "Seinfeld" was about nothing, then you will accept that "Vertical Ray of the Sun" is about almost nothing. For instance, Hanoi is awash in color and brother and sister listen to Lou Reed while they exercise their bodies and exorcise their incestuous longings. Nothing else happens.

"After five minutes of this movie, you're going to wish you had 10 beers." These bursts of wisdom are indicative of an odd girl who will have to find out how to maneuver in a much less honest world.

The Coen brothers are back with their usual barnyard of eccentric characters.

I haven't quite figured out why I love film noir, but the Coen Brothers make me remember some of the reasons. Cinematographer Roger Deakin drenches the shots in vivid black and white, reminding me of noir's diet of good and evil, like a virginal young musician who suprisingly goes down on Billy Bob Thornton's Ed to reward him for trying to help her, thus precipitating an almost deadly accident because of the reward.

She's a little troublemaker with a big heart, and if you don't watch her, she'll steal the gnome from your garden and then your heart.

2001 Paramount Classics

All we get here are actors whose lives and conversation are punctuated by no more wisdom than comments about perfuming private parts and penis size.

Ed Burns's Tommy Riley is caught renting "Breakfast at Tiffany's," leading to an affair and a pregnancy. This is the most excitement you're going to get in this Woody Allen rip-off.

May to December can be the cruelest months if they're about a relationship between a young woman and an older man.

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