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Planet Money
4:35 am
Mon May 4, 2015

Where Poor Kids Grow Up Makes A Huge Difference

Where you grow up matters.
Quoctrung Bui/NPR

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 4:45 am

In two new studies, Harvard economist Raj Chetty and his colleagues found that where poor kids grow up has a huge effect on how much money they earn as adults.

In one study, families living in public housing were randomly selected to be eligible for housing vouchers that required them to move to low poverty neighborhoods. Kids whose families received the vouchers grew up to earn significantly more than those whose families remained in public housing.

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Parallels
3:23 am
Mon May 4, 2015

A Novel Dutch Lawsuit Demands Govt. Cut Carbon Emissions

Much of the Netherlands is below sea level, including Amsterdam. Urgenda argues that any rise in the sea level could have a huge impact on the country.
Ari Shapiro NPR

A lawsuit in the Netherlands is taking an unusual approach to climate change. So unusual, in fact, that experts around the world are watching it closely, wondering whether it might spark a major shift in environmentalists' efforts to limit carbon emissions.

If that happens, it won't be the first time that Marjam Minnesma has turned the status quo on its head.

She's founder and director of a Dutch environmental organization called Urgenda, an abbreviation for "urgent agenda."

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Photography
3:22 am
Mon May 4, 2015

A Landscape Of Abundance Becomes A Landscape Of Scarcity

Courtesy of Matt Black

Photographer Matt Black grew up in California's Central Valley. He has dedicated his life to documenting the area's small towns and farmers.

Last year, he says he realized what had been a mild drought was now severe. It had simply stopped raining.

"It was kind of a daily surreal thing to walk outside," Black says.

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Shots - Health News
3:03 am
Mon May 4, 2015

A Woman Uses Art To Come To Terms With Her Father's Death

Of I Wish You The Sunshine Of Tomorrow, Rodgers says: "The ICU room my dad was in on the day he died had yellow walls. Every time we visited him we had to wear hospital gowns that were a bright yellow. [It] was a recurring color in that whole time frame of my life."
Courtesy of Jennifer Rodgers

A month after her father died of sepsis, Jennifer Rodgers began creating maps.

She took a large piece of paper, splattered it with black paint and then tore it into pieces. Then she began to draw: short black lines mimic the steps she walked in the hospital hallway during her father's hospitalization.

"It was a physical release of emotion for me," she says.

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All Tech Considered
6:52 pm
Sun May 3, 2015

The Promise And Potential Pitfalls Of Apple's ResearchKit

ResearchKit, presented by Apple's Jeff Williams in March, enables app creation to aid medical research.
Eric Risberg AP

Most of the tech buzz these days has centered on the new Apple Watch — including on the potential for health-related apps. Less attention has been given to Apple's ResearchKit, an open-source mobile software platform released in March.

But the medical world is paying attention.

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Planet Money
6:20 pm
Sun May 3, 2015

Casinos Trading Slot Machines For Games Requiring Skill

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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U.S.
6:20 pm
Sun May 3, 2015

In Baltimore, The Curfew Ends And Residents Observe A Day Of Reflection

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 7:44 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
6:20 pm
Sun May 3, 2015

In Syria, Signs That The Army Is Losing Ground To Rebel Groups

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 7:52 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Technology
6:20 pm
Sun May 3, 2015

A Poker Battle Against A Computer

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Last night, Mayweather and Pacquiao - big fight - blah, blah, blah - who cares? Humans fight humans all the time. But 18 years ago today, a really interesting face off - world chess champion Garry Kasparov versus supercomputer Deep Blue.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Asia
6:20 pm
Sun May 3, 2015

In Nepal, Efforts Underway To Salvage Ancient Sites Damaged By Quake

Buddhist monks recover a statue of a Buddhist deity from a monastery at Swayambhunath.
Niranjan Shrestha AP

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 8:46 pm

Swayambhunath — also known as the Monkey Temple, for its holy, furry dwellers that swing from the rosewood trees — is one of the oldest and most sacred Buddhist sites in Nepal's Kathmandu Valley, an important pilgrimage destination for Hindus as well as Buddhists. It was also one of the worst damaged by last month's earthquake.

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It's All Politics
5:03 pm
Sun May 3, 2015

5 Things You Should Know About Ben Carson

In this handout photo from Singapore's Raffles Hospital, Dr. Keith Goh and Carson operate on 29-year-old conjoined twins Ladan and Laleh Bijani in 2003.
Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 8:24 pm

This post was updated at 8:20 p.m. E.T.

The field of major Republican presidential candidates is growing larger. Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee and former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina are expected to jump into the race this week.

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The Two-Way
4:00 pm
Sun May 3, 2015

NYPD Officer In Critical Condition After Shooting

This undated photo released by the New York City Police Department shows officer Brian Moore. Moore, a New York City police officer, was shot in the head and critically wounded while attempting to stop a man suspected of carrying a gun.
AP

A man accused of shooting a plainclothes New York police officer in New York has been charged with two counts of attempted murder of a police officer, officials say. The officer, who was shot Saturday night, remains in hospital in critical but stable condition, The Associated Press reports.

The officer, Brian Moore, 25, was attacked in Queens Village. His alleged assailant has been identified as 35-year-old Demetrius Blackwell.

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Middle East
12:40 pm
Sun May 3, 2015

Yemen's Descent, Through A Photographer's Lens

Alex Potter for NPR

Editor's Note: Photographer Alex Potter arrived in Yemen in 2012 as the country was going through an uprising, part of the broader upheavals in the Arab world. She has lived in the capital Sanaa for much of the past three years, growing deeply attached to the country and the people even as Yemen has descended into chaos.

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The Two-Way
11:23 am
Sun May 3, 2015

Italian Coast Guard Rescues 3,700 Migrants In Mediterranean

Migrants arriving at the Lampedusa island harbor aboard an Italian Coast Guard ship early Sunday. Ships rescued 3,690 migrants in just one day from smugglers' boats on the Mediterranean Sea off the Libyan coast, the Italian Coast Guard says.
Mauro Buccarello AP

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 4:01 pm

Italy's coast guard says it has managed to rescue some 3,700 migrants in a single day from smugglers' boats off the coast of Libya in 17 separate operations designed to stem the tide of illegal immigration to Europe from refugees leaving North Africa.

The operations took place just weeks after an estimated 800 migrants were drowned when their boat capsized en route to the Italian island of Lampedusa.

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The Two-Way
10:54 am
Sun May 3, 2015

Baltimore Mayor Lifts Curfew

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake speaks during a media availability at City Hall, on Friday. The mayor announced Sunday that she was lifting a week-long 10 p.m. curfew that followed civil unrest over the death of Freddie Gray from injuries he sustained in police custody.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 5:07 pm

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced today that she was lifting a 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew in the city imposed nearly a week ago amid civil unrest over the death of Freddie Gray from injuries sustained in police custody.

"I want to thank the people of Baltimore for their patience," she said.

The emergency curfew was put in place after riots that took place in West Baltimore on Monday.

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Asia
10:11 am
Sun May 3, 2015

Nepal's Medical Worries: Crowded Hospitals, Open Wounds

Hospital staff members work at the reception area of a hospital in Kathmandu. Some 14,000 were injured in Nepal's earthquake.
Nicolas Asfouri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 8:43 pm

An estimated 14,000 were injured in April's earthquake in Nepal. The caseload is overwhelming hospitals in Kathmandu, says Dr. Bianca Grecu-Jacobs, a resident in emergency medicine from California who was working in Nepal when the quake struck.

"[In] the lobby areas, patients just are on the floor waiting," Grecu-Jacobs says via Skype from Katmandu. "They strung up IVs for patients who need them in whatever manner they can."

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The Two-Way
10:09 am
Sun May 3, 2015

101-Year-Old Man Among Quake Survivors Found In Nepal

A boy crawls into the ruins of a collapsed building to look for usable things in Nepal's capital, Kathmandu, on Sunday. Officials say they have found three survivors in the rubble a full week after a powerful earthquake.
Kyodo/Landov

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 4:05 pm

Rescue workers digging through the rubble in Nepal have discovered three survivors — including a man thought to be 101 — a week after a powerful earthquake leveled buildings in the South Asian country, killing more than 7,000.

NPR's Russell Lewis reports from Kathmandu: "The man was found alive in the rubble of his home northwest of the capital Kathmandu. He only had minor injuries and was taken to the hospital for observation. Rescuers found him on the same day that Nepali officials ruled out finding any more survivors from the 7.8 magnitude earthquake."

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Asia
9:20 am
Sun May 3, 2015

To Restore Its Shattered Treasures, Nepal Has A Secret Weapon

Master carvers like Ratna Muni Brahmacharya are in a position to play a key role in restoring Nepal's many damaged temples and monuments.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 8:34 pm

Blue-uniformed police do the heavy lifting in Dabar square in the city of Patan, one of Nepal's oldest. Moving wooden beams and stacking broken bricks, they sift through ruined monuments, some of which date back four centuries and more.

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The Two-Way
7:55 am
Sun May 3, 2015

A Boat Of Their Own: All-Women Team Tackles Sailing's Toughest Race

Leg 5 from New Zealand to Itajai, Brazil aboard aboard Team SCA in March.
Anna-Lena Elled /Team SCA

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 10:50 am

What's the worst thing about sailing through the fierce winds and mountainous seas of the Southern Ocean?

"Just being freezing cold," says Sara Hastreiter, a 30-year-old native of Wyoming who is crewing on the first all-women Volvo Ocean Race team since 2001. The eight-month around-the-world event, sailed in stages, set off from Spain in October.

"Getting out of your bunk when you're just violently shivering. That's really tough," she says of the remote stretch of water that circles Antarctica.

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Goats and Soda
7:49 am
Sun May 3, 2015

China Promises $46 Billion To Pave The Way For A Brand New Silk Road

Alison Hurt/NPR Xinhua

Originally published on Sun May 3, 2015 10:50 am

Go to Xi'an city in northwest China, and you can still hear amateur musical ensembles playing court music from the Tang Dynasty. One of the tunes is about flowers — tulips imported over the Silk Road from Europe some 1,300 years ago.

The Silk Road was a network of trade routes that allowed the exchange of goods and ideas between Asia and Europe, including between the Roman Empire and China's Han Dynasty, towards the end of the first century B.C.

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