LATEST FROM NPR

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Bourang Ba was a young farmer in Sitacourou — a sleepy village of scattered thatched roof dwellings where cattle chomp on hay in courtyards. Last year, the father of two set out for Europe, leaving behind his son, daughter and young wife, Nialina. Like his two half-brothers who had already migrated to Spain, he hoped to send money home for the family.

Bourang Ba never made it to Europe. He drowned in the Mediterranean en route.

"He wanted to do his bit and provide for his relatives, so he left without telling me," sobs Wassa Ba, Bourang Ba's father.

Softball pitcher Monica Abbott has been collecting records her entire career.

Risk Of Opioid Overdose Climbs At Middle Age

14 hours ago

Evidence is mounting that Prince may have died of a drug overdose. While the medical examiner hasn't yet released the results of the autopsy and toxicology scans in this case, opioid overdose in middle age is all too common.

This story is part of NPR's podcast Embedded, which digs deep into the stories behind the news.

Sitting on a dresser in the back bedroom of a house in Austin, Ind., is the bottom of a soda can. A woman places a sliver of a pill, a powerful prescription opioid called Opana, on the jagged half-can. She begins to heat the pill with a cigarette lighter, melting its hard white coating and turning it the color of whiskey.

Her name is Joy.

Kenyan rescue workers freed a woman from the rubble of a building in Nairobi on Thursday, six days after its collapse.

Then, just hours later, the Kenya Red Cross said three more people — a man and two women — were rescued alive.

NPR's Gregory Warner in Nairobi tells our Newscast unit that the collapse of the six-story building on Friday killed at least 36 people. He adds that dozens are still missing. Here's more from Gregory on the first rescue Thursday:

Over the past few hours, Nigerians have been buzzing about Captain America: Civil War, the latest in the Marvel Comics film series, on the Twitter hashtag #CaptainAmericaInNigeria.

Finger-lickin' good?

KFC in Hong Kong is marketing edible nail polish that tastes like — wait for it — chicken.

"Yes, it is actually a real thing," the agency running the campaign tells The New York Times.

Days after he published a lengthy blog post in which he claimed to be "Satoshi Nakamoto," the alias used to create the bitcoin cryptocurrency, Australian Craig Wright has erased the post and replaced it with one that says he doesn't "have the courage" to prove his claim.

Here's what seems to be the central paragraph in the new post:

"When the rumors began, my qualifications and character were attacked. When those allegations were proven false, new allegations have already begun. I know now that I am not strong enough for this."

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Many credit card and loan agreements these days have in the small type what's called a "mandatory arbitration clause." Most people don't even know what that means. But by signing, customers agree not to sue the financial firm in a class action lawsuit. Instead, they agree to work out any problem with an arbitrator hired by the bank.

People are voting in local elections across the U.K. on Thursday, but there is extra attention focused on London's mayoral contest. If the race goes as many pollsters expect, the city could have its first Muslim mayor.

Parliament members Sadiq Khan of the Labour Party and Zac Goldsmith of the Conservative Party are the front-runners in the field of about a dozen candidates vying to replace Conservative Mayor Boris Johnson.

A U.S. Army captain has filed a lawsuit against President Obama over the legality of the war against ISIS in Iraq and Syria.

Capt. Nathan Michael Smith, 28, who is currently on active duty in Kuwait, filed the lawsuit Wednesday in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. He argues that the war is illegal because it lacks congressional authorization.

'The Queue' Carries On A Dystopian Lineage

16 hours ago

In an unspecified Middle Eastern city, a doctor is drawn to and troubled by a particular patient file. The file documents the injuries of a man named Yehya, sustained after a skirmish called the Disgraceful Events. Not only are the events shrouded in mystery; Yehya himself does not know who shot him. And the doctor would have already removed the bullet, except for the fact that in that aftermath of the Disgraceful Events, the government has made it illegal to do so without a certain permit. Yehya must get that permit so the doctor can do the surgery.

For several decades now, Georgia Tech professor Tom Conte has been studying how to improve computers: "How do we make them faster and more efficient next time around versus what we just made?"

Last week, there was a big development in the long-running, bitter, complicated battle over a 9,000-year-old set of bones known variously as "Kennewick Man" or "The Ancient One," depending on whom you ask.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers confirmed that the ancient bearer of the bones is genetically linked to modern-day Native Americans. Now, under federal law, a group of tribes that has been fighting to rebury him will almost certainly get to do so.

Debtors' prisons have long been illegal in the United States. But many courts across the country still send people to jail when they can't pay their court fines. Last year, the Justice Department stepped in to stop the practice in Ferguson, Mo. And now, in a first, a U.S. city will pay out thousands of dollars to people who were wrongly sent to jail.

On paper, sending surplus U.S. peanuts to feed 140,000 malnourished Haitian schoolchildren for a full year sounds like a heroic plan. Instead, it's united 60 aid groups that are urgently calling on the U.S. Department of Agriculture to halt a shipment containing 500 metric tons of peanuts, preventing the legumes from reaching Haiti.

Pages