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First Listen
7:23 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

First Listen: Devendra Banhart, 'Mala'

Devendra Banhart's new album, Mala, comes out March 12.
Ana Kras Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 10:08 am

For a guy who gets tagged with a lot of limiting descriptors — "freak folk," "hippie" and so forth — Devendra Banhart doesn't like to let his music sit in any spot for long. His catalog, which now includes seven official albums, has taken him through warmly intimate ballads, raw and unselfconsciously strange home recordings, songs in several languages (Banhart spent much of his childhood in Venezuela), a lot of smoothly strummy folk-pop and the occasional low-key anthem about free-spiritedness.

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The Two-Way
5:35 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

'Batman' Turns Over Wanted Man To Police In England

Batman brings in a wanted man to a police department in England.
West Yorkshire Police

Batman has apparently given up Gotham for a stint in the northern English town of Bradford.

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Commentary
5:34 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Cologne: Cultural Choice Or Necessity?

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Can we keep evolving as we get older? That's a question comedian and commentator Kevin Heffernan decided to explore. And his approach to changing himself was an aromatic one.

KEVIN HEFFERNAN, BYLINE: Cologne, it's a life choice. Some say it's hereditary. If your dad did it, you will. Like what sports team you root for or circumcision. Some say it's cultural. Some say it's a necessity.

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It's All Politics
5:28 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Scientists Are The New Kings (Or At Least Secretaries) At Energy Department

Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientist Ernest Moniz is introduced by President Obama as the nominee to run the Energy Department, Monday at the White House.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 6:18 pm

With President Obama nominating Ernest Moniz to be the nation's next energy secretary, he continued a relatively recent trend of putting scientists atop a part of the federal bureaucracy once overseen by political types.

If confirmed by the Senate, Moniz, an MIT physicist, will follow Nobel laureate Steven Chu, a University of California physicist who served as Obama's first-term energy secretary.

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Shots - Health News
5:19 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Got A Health Care Puzzle? There Should Be An App!

The GetHealth app was a runner-up at the recent Hackovate Health Innovation Competition held in Kansas City, Mo.
Courtesy of GetHealth Limited

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:41 pm

Kansas City, Mo., is looking to boost its health-tech cred.

So the city that's home to Cerner Corp. and other health information firms seemed a natural to host something called the Hackovate Health Innovation Competition.

A mashup of innovation and old-school hacking (though none of the participants was bent on doing harm, we're assured), the goal of the competition was to improve the nation's health system and help people navigate the complexities of the Affordable Care Act.

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U.S.
5:17 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Steamship Anchors A Community, But Its Days May Be Numbered

The nation's last coal-burning ferry, the SS Badger, sits on Lake Michigan in the port town of Ludington, Mich. The EPA permit that has long allowed the ship to dump coal ash into the lake is now under review.
Courtesy photo for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:50 pm

On the shores of Lake Michigan, the tiny town of Ludington, Mich., is home port to the last coal-fired ferry in the U.S. The SS Badger has been making trips across the lake to Manitowoc, Wis., during the good-weather months since 1953. And as it runs, the 411-foot ferry discharges coal ash slurry directly into the lake.

An Environmental Protection Agency permit allows the Badger to dump four tons of ash into the lake daily. But now, the agency has put the permit under review — and that means the Badger could stop sailing.

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The Salt
5:17 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

In Kazakhstan, No Horror At Horse Meat

Signs advertise the type of meat sold in each section of the Green Market in Almaty, Kazakhstan.
Sly06/Flickr

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 6:24 pm

Though the thought of horse meat in British lasagna or Ikea meatballs may be stomach-churning to some people, in some cultures the practice of eating horse meat is not just acceptable, it's a treat. NPR's Peter Kenyon just returned from the Central Asian republic of Kazakhstan and checked out the meat market at the Green Bazaar in Almaty.

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All Tech Considered
4:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Street Lights, Security Systems And Sewers? They're Hackable, Too

An analyst works at a federal cybersecurity center in Idaho in 2011. Experts say Internet-connected infrastructure is a possible target of cyberwarfare.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 6:05 pm

Allegations that the Chinese military has been hacking U.S. corporations are raising tensions. But in the case of a full-fledged cyberwar, things would look very different.

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Middle East
4:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

'Conscience' of Syrian Revolution Faces Challenge from Islamists

Islamists from Jabhat al Nusra stage their own protest in the town. Until recently, the group has been reluctant to appear in public.
NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 6:00 pm

Kafr Nabl is surrounded by rocky hills covered with olive and fig trees. Located in northwest Syria near the Turkish border, it used to be a sleepy town of about 30,000 people. Then it rose up against the government in early 2011. More than a year later, the town was "liberated" by anti-government rebels who forced out soldiers and police who worked for the government.

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Remembrances
4:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Three Motown Artists Die Within Weeks Of Each Other

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:34 pm

Audie Cornish has more on three Motown artists who died recently — Bobby Rogers, a founding member of the hit-making Motown group the Miracles; Richard Street, a member of the Temptations; and Damon Harris, who sang with the Temptations on many of their hits.

The Two-Way
4:38 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Listing The World's Billionaires: A Not-So-Exact Science

Two recent tallies of the world's richest people agree on the broad points — but not on which continent has the most billionaires. Here, U.S. dollars are counted, with Chinese yuan notes in the background.
STR AFP/Getty Images

There are more than 1,400 billionaires in the world right now, according to two sources — one in the U.S., and one in China. But the tallies by Forbes and Hurun Report differ on key points, including whether there are now more billionaires in Asia than anywhere else.

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The Two-Way
4:17 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Historic Election Day In Kenya Is Marred By The Killing Of 19

Voters line up in Kibera to vote. Long lines stretched over a mile long in some parts of Nairobi.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:16 pm

The historic presidential election in Kenya turned violent in two polling stations near the border with Somalia on Monday.

NPR's Gregory Warner reports from Nairobi that the attack marred what had been an otherwise peaceful day. He filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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Music Reviews
3:50 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Latin Gold In The Frozen North At Toronto's Lula Lounge

Jane Bunnett's "Ron Con Ron" is featured on Lula Lounge: Essential Tracks.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:34 pm

For years, Canada has welcomed waves of newcomers from Latin America and the Caribbean. A thriving music scene has grown out of this migration — like the one at Lula Lounge, a nightclub in a working-class neighborhood of Toronto. The club's co-founder, Jose Ortega, cut his teeth in New York's legendary Latin scene. When he came to Toronto, he found the vibe fresher, more open to experimentation. And he found talent. It was just a matter of time before the country produced great Latin bands.

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World Cafe
3:35 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Next: Jesse Dee

Jesse Dee.
Michael D. Spencer Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 10:46 pm

Boston-based R&B singer-songwriter Jesse Dee has opened for concerts by soul legends Etta James and Al Green, among others. Released last month, his debut album On My Mind, In My Heart is an energetic collection of funky, feel-good grooves.

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The Two-Way
3:27 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Appeals Court Rules Arizona Day Labor Solicitation Law Is Unconstitutional

Day laborers wait on at a street corner in Tucson, Ariz., hoping for an employer to drive up and put them to work. The photograph was taken in 2008.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

The sweeping anti-immigration law passed by Arizona in 2010, received another buffet today: A panel of the the San Francisco-based U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals stood with a lower court, ruling that a ban on drivers soliciting day laborers violates the constitution's free speech guarantee.

Bloomberg News does a good job at laying out the legal issues in the case:

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Shots - Health News
3:22 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Best Defense Against Fire Ants May Be Allergy Shot Offense

The sting of Solenopsis invicta, the red imported fire ant, is well known to many in the Southern United States, but immunotherapy is possible.
Courtesy of Alex Wild

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 6:55 am

"Life-threatening fire ant attack" may sound like a B-movie script, but for people living in the Southern third of the United States, it's no joke.

These ant stings can cause deadly allergic reactions, but most people aren't getting the allergy shots that could save their lives, a new study says.

Fire ants sting people, just like bees do, and 2 to 3 percent of people are allergic to the ant's venom. But where bee stings are rare, fire ant stings are incredibly common for people who live in Texas and other Southern states.

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Movie Reviews
1:53 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Cinerama Brought The Power Of Peripheral Vision To The Movies

A film still of New York City from 1952's This Is Cinerama. The film was meant to introduce audiences to the new Cinerama widescreen.
Flicker Alley LLC

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 2:51 pm

As early as silent film, directors attempted to create widescreen images. But in the 1950s it became a commercial necessity to give the multitude of new TV watchers what they couldn't get on a small screen. So even before CinemaScope, VistaVision, Todd-AO and Panavision, there was Cinerama — a process in which three projectors threw three simultaneous images onto a gigantic curved screen. Cinerama offered what no TV or movie screen could provide before — peripheral vision, which could make you feel as if you were really in the midst of the action.

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Movie Interviews
1:53 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Mike White On Creating HBO's 'Enlightened' Whistle-Blower

In HBO's Enlightened, Laura Dern stars as corporate executive Amy Jellicoe, who returns from a post-meltdown retreat to pick up the pieces of her broken life. Series creator Mike White stars as Tyler, Amy's friend and co-worker.
Lacey Terrell HBO

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 2:51 pm

The HBO series Enlightened wrapped up its second season Sunday night. The show began as the story of a woman — the naive, idealistic, manipulative, determined and sincere Amy Jellicoe, played by Laura Dern — trying to put her life back together in the wake of a breakdown. After spending a couple of months at a New Age recovery center in Hawaii, Amy attempts to apply what she has learned to her life back in the real world of corporate America.

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The Two-Way
1:51 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Napolitano: Airport Lines Have Seen '150 to 200 Percent' Increase Since Sequester

People wait in a security line at John F. Kennedy Airport on February 28, 2013 in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 6:50 pm

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano says the across-the-board spending cuts that went into effect on Friday are already causing headaches at the nation's airports.

"Now that we are having to reduce or eliminate basically overtime both for TSA and for customs, now that we have instituted a hiring freeze... we will begin today sending out furlough notices," Napolitano said, according to Politico.

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The Two-Way
1:49 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Retirement Home Defends Nurse's Refusal To Administer CPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:58 pm

The head of a California retirement home where a nurse last week refused to administer CPR to an elderly woman says his staff followed policy in handling the emergency.

In a written statement, Jeffrey Toomer, the executive director of Glenwood Gardens in Bakersfield, Calif., says it is the facility's practice "to immediately call emergency medical personnel for assistance and to wait with the individual needing attention until such personnel arrives. ... That is the protocol we followed."

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