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The Salt
12:00 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Small Farmers Aren't Cashing In With Wal-Mart

Wal-Mart claims that 11 percent of the produce in its stores now comes from local farms.
Abbie Fentress Swanson Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:21 am

When Wal-Mart calls, Herman Farris always finds whatever the retailer wants, even if it's yucca root in the dead of winter. Farris is a produce broker in Columbia, Mo., who has been buying for Wal-Mart from auctions and farms since the company began carrying fruits and vegetables in the early 1990s.

During the summer and fall, nearly everything Farris delivers is grown in Missouri. That's Wal-Mart's definition of "local" — produce grown and sold in the same state. In winter, it's a bit tougher to source locally.

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Television
11:51 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Super Bowl Ads: Winners And Losers

Some people enjoy the Super Bowl commercials more than the football game. Host Michel Martin and Tampa Bay Times media critic Eric Deggans run through the best and worst ads; from senior citizens making late night trips to Taco Bell to nerds getting really sloppy kisses.

Politics
11:51 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Political Chat: Gun Control And The Senate

The debate over gun control continues to dominate the headlines. Meanwhile, the U.S. Senate doubles the number of African-American members by welcoming William 'Mo" Cowan. He replaces John Kerry. Host Michel Martin talks politics with Republican strategist Ron Christie and Keli Goff, political correspondent for The Root.

The Two-Way
11:16 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Reports: 'American Sniper' Chris Kyle Died While Trying To Help Fellow Veteran

Chris Kyle, retired Navy SEAL and bestselling author of the book American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History, in April 2012. He was killed Saturday.
Paul Moseley/Fort Worth Star-Telegram MCT /Landov

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:56 pm

More is being learned today about former Navy SEAL Chris Kyle and the man accused of killing the decorated Iraq War veteran.

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Europe
10:45 am
Mon February 4, 2013

For Greeks, Painful Cuts Keep Tearing At The Social Fabric

Georgia Kolia, 63, has two adult children, both unemployed. She works as a volunteer distributing loaves of bread at the Agia Zonis Orthodox church soup kitchen for the poor in Athens, Greece, in April 2012.
John Kolesidis Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

Greeks are feeling the squeeze. The social repercussions of three years of austerity measures imposed by international lenders are hitting hard. Thousands of businesses have shut down, unemployment is nearly 27 percent and rising, and the once dependable safety net of welfare benefits is being pulled in.

With further cutbacks and tax hikes about to kick in, Greece's social fabric is being torn apart.

Nowhere are cutbacks more visible and painful than in health care.

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Shots - Health News
10:37 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Experimental Tuberculosis Vaccine Fails To Protect Infants

Nurse Christel Petersen inoculates a child in the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative study in 2011.
Rodger Bosch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 6:03 pm

Researchers are disappointed in the results of a long-awaited study of the leading candidate vaccine against tuberculosis, one of humankind's most elusive scourges.

But, pointing to more than a dozen other TB vaccines in the pipeline, they say they're not discouraged.

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Games + Leisure
10:02 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Tackle 'Yards' To Make A Touchdown

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 7:24 am

On-air challenge: In recognition of the Super Bowl, the key word is "yards." You will be given some categories. For each one, name something in the category beginning with each of the letters Y, A, R, D and S. For example, if the category were "Girls' Names," you might say Yvonne, Alice, Rachel, Donna and Sally.

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Games + Leisure
10:01 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Astronaut Mae Jemison Plays Not My Job

NASA

Originally published on Sat February 2, 2013 10:53 am

In 1992, Mae Jemison became the first African-American woman to fly in space when she served as a science mission specialist. We've invited Jemison to play a game called "Excuse me? When do we get to the Southwest terminal?" Jemison has flown in the space shuttle Endeavour, so we thought we'd ask her questions about a sometimes more unpredictable vehicle ... the airport shuttle.

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Food
9:40 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Super Bowl Sunday, A La Sandwich Monday

The waffle layer requires careful placement and suspension of disbelief.
NPR

Originally published on Sat February 2, 2013 3:17 pm

Seven Layer Bean Dip is a staple of Super Bowl parties, but there's an inherent risk: What if you show up with a seven layer dip, and someone else brings eight layer dip? It's humiliating. Last year, we created this 32 Layer Bean Dip recipe to help you win the Dip Arms Race, once and for all.

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Arts + Life
9:39 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Making Up A History For The 'Dutch Mona Lisa'

Very little is known about Girl With a Pearl Earring, which is often referred to as the Dutch Mona Lisa.
Superstock The Art Archive

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 7:24 am

Johannes Vermeer's Girl with a Pearl Earring is one of his most famous paintings, but very little is actually known about it. The girl herself is a mystery who has inspired both a novel and a movie speculating on her true story.

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Literature
9:39 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Sendak's 'Brother's Book': An Elegy, A Farewell

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:09 pm

Maurice Sendak, one of America's most beloved children's book authors, evocatively captured both the wonders and fears of childhood. His books, including Where the Wild Things Are, In the Night Kitchen and Outside Over There, revolutionized picture books by adding danger and darkness to the genre.

Over the course of his life, Sendak wrote and illustrated more than a dozen widely acclaimed books and illustrated almost 80 more. And although he died last May at 83, Sendak still has one more volume on the way.

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Literature
9:34 am
Mon February 4, 2013

The Inconvenient Truth About Polar Bears

A polar bear looks up as the sound of the camera catches his ear on the edge of the Hudson Bay, outside Churchill, Manitoba, Canada.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 2, 2013 6:41 pm

In 2008, reports of polar bears' inevitable march toward extinction gripped headlines. Stories of thinning Arctic ice and even polar bear cannibalism combined to make these predators into a powerful symbol in the debate about climate change.

The headlines caught Zac Unger's attention, and he decided to write a book about the bears.

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Science + Technology
9:31 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Royal Recovery: Remains ID'd As Those Of King Richard III

An enlarged image of the skull identified as that of King Richard III. Jo Appleby, a lecturer in human bioarchaeology at the University of Leicester, is pointing to a detail.
Rui Vieira PA Photos /Landov

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 6:10 pm

Remains found under what's now a parking lot in the English city of Leicester have been confirmed to be those of King Richard III, researchers at the University of Leicester announced Monday.

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The Two-Way
9:09 am
Mon February 4, 2013

VIDEO: 'Today You Can See That I'm Alive,' Says Malala, Girl Shot By Taliban

Malala Yousafzai in a video released Monday.
Storyful

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 9:52 am

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Monkey See
8:46 am
Mon February 4, 2013

That Was A Great Blackout Last Night

Kicker David Akers of the San Francisco 49ers waits during a power outage that occurred in the third quarter that caused a 34-minute delay during Super Bowl XLVII.
Ezra Shaw Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 11:38 am

Great blackout last night, right?

It's been clear for some time that substantially more people watch the Super Bowl than have the slightest interest in watching the actual football game. That's why there's such hubbub over the halftime show and the commercials — it gives non-football types something to pay attention to instead of football.

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Sports
8:35 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Lights Out, It Was A Memorable Super Bowl

Baltimore Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs waits on the field after the half the lights went out in the third quarter of Sunday's Super Bowl against the San Francisco 49ers in New Orleans.
Mike Segar Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 11:45 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Mike Pesca on the Super Bowl

There was a 108-yard kickoff return for a touchdown.

A last-minute drive that could have won the game for San Francisco.

An MVP performance by Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco.

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The Two-Way
7:32 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Book News: Myanmar Celebrates As Censorship Recedes; And Oh Those Seussian Hats

A sea of Seuss hats at an event at the Library of Congress in 2010.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:56 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Business
7:19 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Canadian Government Retires Its Penny

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:09 pm

The Canadian mint stops distributing pennies on Monday. Canada stopped making one-cent coins last year to cut costs, since each penny cost 1.6 cents to make. Most stores will round out change to the nearest five cents.

Around the Nation
7:08 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Twitter Lit Up When Superdome Lost Power

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:09 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

If you can imagine, Twitter was on fire during the Super Bowl. But the Twitterverse really lit up when the lights went out at the Superdome. Predictably, someone created a Twitter account named SuperBowlLights, and there were tweets like this: Only need half the lights anyway, as only half the teams are playing - that's just mean. Many people tweeted that it must have been Beyonce who knocked out the lights with her electric half-time show

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