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World Cafe
5:42 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Next: The Lighthouse And The Whaler

The Lighthouse and the Whaler.
Ming Wu Courtesy of the artist
  • Hear two new tracks from The Lighthouse and the Whaler

The Lighthouse and the Whaler is a band based in Cleveland, Ohio, though its name actually references the waters off the coast of Massachusetts. Originally, Michael LoPresti and Aaron Smith were its only members, and the very first song they wrote together, "The Field Song," ended up picked for a Paste sampler CD.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:41 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Researchers Say Kids Are Exposed To 'Startling' Amounts Of Background TV

It might be time to pull the plug, even if she doesn't seem to be watching.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 5:51 pm

Parents, if nobody is watching the TV, please turn it off.

Researchers who conducted a national survey of kids' exposure to TVs droning on in the background say, "The amount of exposure for the average child is startling."

How much is it, exactly? Try just under four hours a day for the typical kid.

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It's All Politics
5:41 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Montana Democrat Faces An Uphill Battle To Keep His Senate Seat

Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., (center) campaigns at a parade Saturday in Belgrade, Mont.
Martin Kaste NPR

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 6:23 pm

Republicans are still within reach of a big political goal this year: retaking control of the Senate. They lost the majority in 2006, in part because of the razor-close victory of Democratic challenger Jon Tester in Montana.

Now, Tester is the incumbent facing a tough challenge of his own. And if he's going to win re-election, he has to turn out a lot of younger voters, the way he did in 2006. And on that front, he does have some allies.

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Music Interviews
5:32 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Janis Martin, 'The Female Elvis,' Returns

A publicity photo of Janis Martin in the late 1950s or early '60s.
GAB Archive Redferns

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 9:28 am

Janis Martin was just a teenager from Virginia when she was christened "The Female Elvis." In the mid-1950s, she sold 750,000 copies of a song called "Will You, Willyum." She played the Grand Ole Opry, American Bandstand and The Tonight Show. But her fame was short-lived. Martin got married and had a baby, which didn't sit so well with the people managing her career. Her label dropped her, and she fell off the musical map.

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Asia
5:22 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Cambodian Court Case Stokes Fear Of Crackdown

Supporters of Cambodian journalist Mam Sonando protest outside a Phnom Penh courthouse on Monday, when judges sentenced him to 20 years in jail for leading an alleged secession movement. Critics say the pro-democracy activist's case was politically motivated.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 6:20 pm

A court in Cambodia has convicted a prominent journalist and pro-democracy activist on charges of convincing villagers in eastern Cambodia to rise up and declare independence from the country. Civic groups say the case is part of a worrying trend of government efforts to stifle freedom of expression, and attempts to take land away from farmers.

Hundreds of supporters vented their fury outside the courthouse Monday as judges sentenced Mam Sonando to 20 years in jail. Speaking before the verdict, his wife, Dinn Phanara, says the case was politically motivated.

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Author Interviews
5:11 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Housekeeping Tips From One Mercurial 'Mommy'

Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 6:20 pm

The cursing mommy likes her scotch. She also likes a martini — or four — and a full bottle of Kahlua consumed in the afternoon while soaking in a steaming bathtub and ignoring the knocks of her children locked outside. Along with her dubious parenting skills, the cursing mommy has no shame, and she swears an extremely blue streak.

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'Another Thing': Test Your Clever Skills
5:05 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

'Another Thing': A Terrible Toy For The 21st Century

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 1:56 pm

Each week, All Things Considered and Lenore Skenazy, author of the book and blog Free-Range Kids, bring you "Another Thing," an on-air puzzle to test your cleverness skills. We take a trend in the news and challenge you to help us satirize it with a song title, a movie name or something else wacky.

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Latin America
5:03 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

No More 'Lying': Law Bolsters Transgender Argentines

Transsexuals Maiamar Abrodos (right) and Maria Laura Aleman arrive at the civil registry to begin the legal process to change their genders in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in June.
Natacha Pisarenko AP

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 6:20 pm

Mateo Solares came to Argentina from Bolivia a few years ago. The 25-year-old was born, and grew up as, Moyra Veronica. Biologically female, Solares says he always felt like a guy.

The main reason Solares moved to Argentina is because it seemed like an easier place to transition into a life as a young man. He says having an ID card that reflects how he sees himself is huge.

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Politics
4:35 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Presidential Campaigns Rock The Gamer Vote

An ad for President Obama's re-election campaign appears in Madden NFL 13.
EA Games

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 6:27 pm

Let's say you're pushing 115 mph on the highway, racing neck and neck with a Chevy Camaro — in an online video game, of course.

Right as you're pulling into the lead, you notice a billboard pop up on your TV screen. Early voting has begun? Voteforchange.com? Whoa, keep your eyes on the road!

This is Need for Speed: Carbon, one of 18 games that the Obama campaign advertised in during the 2008 campaign. This year, President Obama is back at it, running ads in Madden NFL 13, on the free online game site Pogo.com, and in mobile games like Tetris.

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Solve This
4:32 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Obama, Romney On Taxes: Similar Plans, Few Details

Both President Obama and rival Mitt Romney say the tax code is too complicated. But they haven't been specific about which tax breaks they want to eliminate.
Tim Boyle Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 6:20 pm

Here's something President Obama and Mitt Romney agree on: America's tax system is too complicated. Both men have outlined changes that are broadly similar, but with some important differences.

The Problem:

Today's tax code is like a department store, where the price tags are high, but there are lots of coupons, sales and weekend specials. That creates some inequities. Just as shoppers can pay different prices depending on which day they buy, taxpayers with the same income can pay very different rates depending on which deductions they qualify for.

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It's All Politics
4:10 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Pelosi Rival's New Ad Features Two Sacrificial Lambs, Including Himself

Actors depict Rep. Nancy Pelosi and zombies in a campaign ad by her Republican challenger.
Screenshot of John Dennis For Congress Ad

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 5:31 pm

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Shots - Health Blog
4:07 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Misdeeds, Not Mistakes, Behind Most Scientific Retractions

A study shows less than a quarter of retractions were the result of honest errors.
The Lancet

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 5:10 pm

When there's something really wrong with a published study, the journal can retract it, much like a carmaker recalling a flawed automobile.

But are the errors that lead to retractions honest mistakes or something more problematic?

A newly published analysis finds that more than two-thirds of biomedical papers retracted over the past four decades were the result of misconduct, not error. That's much higher than previous studies of retractions had found.

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Music Reviews
3:52 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Out Of Industrial Wasteland, The English Beat Was Born

The English Beat.
Adrian Boot Urbanimage.tv

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 5:40 pm

In 1978, it seemed that every kid in Britain wanted to be in a punk band. But in Birmingham, that blighted industrial scar in the middle of the island, there wasn't much punk to be seen. The oasis was a club called Barbarella's, and that's where Dave Wakeling and Andy Cox hung out.

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The Salt
3:51 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Nearing Its 50th Birthday, Arby's Gets A 'Fresh' Makeover, New Logo

The new Arby's logo is a sleeker and more modern version of the old one, but not everyone's a fan.
courtesy Arby's

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 8:20 pm

Quick — when you think of Arby's, do you think of seasoned curly fries or turkey sandwiches?

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All Tech Considered
2:49 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Cloud Computing Saves Health Care Industry Time And Money

Researchers are increasingly using cloud computing to discover new drugs and medical treatments. Cloud computing is often cheaper and quicker than in-house computing.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 4:36 pm

The cloud's vast computing power is making it easier and less expensive for companies and clinicians to discover new drugs and medical treatments. Analyzing data that used to take years and tens of millions of dollars can now be done for a fraction of that amount.

Most of us know Amazon as the world's largest online retailer. But its cloud computing business is booming too.

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The Two-Way
2:09 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Japan Introduces Stiff Fines, Jail Time For Illegal Downloads

South Korean pop group 2NE1 performs during the MTV Video Music Awards Japan show in Makuhari, near Tokyo, in June.
Koji Sasahara AP

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 2:32 pm

Beginning, today, illegally downloading a copy of your favorite new song could land you in jail in Japan.

The country has instituted a new law that punishes those downloaders with up to two years in prison or fines of up to $25,700. CNN reports that the move is an effort to curb music piracy in the country.

CNN adds:

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It's All Politics
2:04 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Voters Angry At Washington Gridlock May Want To Look In The Mirror

Voters these days often reward politicians who sit at either end of the ideological spectrum while punishing those seen as compromisers.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 3:00 pm

Like plenty of other voters, Tony Hocamp is disgusted by Washington. Too often, he says, politicians put their partisan interests ahead of doing what's right for the country.

"The politicians we have in office right now are concerned about nothing but themselves and getting re-elected," says Hocamp, who runs a motel in Marengo, Iowa.

It's easy to get upset during a political era in which the leaders of the two major parties seem incapable of putting aside their differences and working together to solve the nation's problems.

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The Two-Way
1:51 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Remembering To Never Forget: Dominican Republic's 'Parsley Massacre'

1937: Haitians who were hoping to escape the killing in the Dominican Republic.
CulturalDiplomacy.org

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 12:45 pm

  • Julia Alvarez
  • Edwidge Danticat and Julia Alvarez pronounce 'perejil'

Seventy five years ago, thousands of Haitians were murdered in the Dominican Republic by a brutal dictator. It was one of the 20th Century's least-remembered acts of genocide.

As many as 20,000 people are thought to have been killed on orders given by Rafael Trujillo. But the "parsley massacre" went mostly unnoticed outside Hispaniola. Even there, many Dominicans never knew about what happened in early October 1937. They were kept in the dark by Trujillo's henchmen.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:11 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Medicare Rolls Out Carrots And Sticks For Hospital Quality

Medicare to hospitals: Take your pick of carrot or stick.
iStockphoto.com

Starting today, America's hospitals will find that their checks from Medicare are a little bit lighter.

As part of the government's biggest effort yet at paying for performance, Medicare is withholding 1 percent of its regular hospital payments and putting that money into a fund to reward hospitals that score well on 20 different quality measures.

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