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11:44 am
Mon December 17, 2012

Profiling A Shooter: 'Needle In A Haystack'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program we are going to revisit a story that caught our attention about poverty in a place that often seems overlooked. We'll hear about a young woman in the Rust Belt trying to figure out a path to a better life.

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Games + Leisure
11:43 am
Mon December 17, 2012

Sticking With The Sunshine State

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun December 16, 2012 12:25 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name in which the first word starts with "F" and the second word starts with "LA."

Last week's challenge: Name a major U.S. city in two words. Take the first letter of the first word and the first two letters of the second word, and they will spell the standard three-letter abbreviation for the state the city is in. What city is it?

Answer: Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

Winner: Mark Sobolik of Newburg, Ore.

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Movie Interviews
11:37 am
Mon December 17, 2012

'Guilt Trip': Streisand On Songs, Films And Family

Barbra Streisand is Joyce Brewster in The Guilt Trip. The multitalented performer has won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy and a Tony — a feat achieved by fewer than a dozen artists.
Sam Emerson Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 12:27 pm

If a good voice is genetic, it's likely Barbra Streisand got hers from her mother. Streisand's mother was too shy to ever perform professionally, but she had a lyric soprano and would sing at bar mitzvahs in their Brooklyn neighborhood when Streisand was a girl.

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Science + Technology
11:29 am
Mon December 17, 2012

How To Decide If Space Tourists Are Fit To Fly

Astronaut Alan Shepard became the first American in space in 1961. He later developed an inner ear problem that grounded him from space flight until an operation cured him.
NASA

Originally published on Fri December 14, 2012 5:49 pm

Childhood dreams of being an astronaut are easy. Actually blasting off is a little harder.

But now people who have longed to go into space can buy a ticket, if they've got the cash. Are they healthy enough to make the voyage, though?

That's becoming a pressing question as the options for leaving Earth multiply.

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Science + Technology
11:28 am
Mon December 17, 2012

Herbs And Empires: A Brief, Animated History Of Malaria Drugs

Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Wed December 19, 2012 8:57 am

What do Jesuit priests, gin and tonics, and ancient Chinese scrolls have in common? They all show up in our animated history of malaria.

It's a story of geopolitical struggles, traditional medicine, and above all, a war of escalation between scientists and a tiny parasite. Malaria has proved to be a wily foe: Every time we think we have it backed into a corner, it somehow escapes.

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Science + Technology
11:14 am
Mon December 17, 2012

Pigeon Interruptus — A Fish That Hunts Pigeons On Land

YouTube

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 4:34 pm

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Literature
11:04 am
Mon December 17, 2012

Rod Stewart: Big Dreams, Bigger Hair

Rod Stewart is a Grammy-winning artist and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee. He has two new releases this fall: the memoir Rod and the holiday album Merry Christmas, Baby.
Penny Lancaster Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun December 16, 2012 9:11 am

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Literature
11:03 am
Mon December 17, 2012

3 Books To Read Before The End Of The World

Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 7:03 am

According to the adherents of the 2012 apocalypse theory, rooted in a controversial reading of ancient Mayan numerology, Earth is going to break into pieces and/or be consumed by a solar flare and/or disappear into a black hole on Dec. 21, right before Christmas.

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Arts + Life
11:01 am
Mon December 17, 2012

One Photo, 126 Frames, 2 Billion Leaves, 247 Feet

The giant sequoia is a snow tree, says scientist Steve Sillett, adapted for long winters in the Sierra Nevada. But it's a fire tree, too. Thick bark protects it from burning in lightning-caused fires, which open cones and clear the understory, allowing saplings to find light and prosper.
Michael Nichols National Geographic

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 1:01 pm

Those numbers represent this giant sequoia. Oh, also: The tree is more than three millennia old, and contains about "54,000 cubic feet of wood and bark," according to National Geographic magazine.

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Food
10:59 am
Mon December 17, 2012

A Photographer's Mini Food Fascination

"When I was young the cones were so big you could drive a car through them."
Christopher Boffoli

Originally published on Fri December 14, 2012 10:32 am

Small stuff is having a big moment. There's skateboarding for your fingers, cupcake-size lasagna, and now we've discovered photography featuring food as a backdrop for miniature life.

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Food
10:56 am
Mon December 17, 2012

Cheese And Raw Veggies May Be Antidote To Kids' Mindless Eating

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 11:11 am

It's hard to eat just one potato chip. The salt, the fat, the crunch — no wonder we mindlessly munch away, especially if we're parked in front of the TV.

So is there something better for children to snack on in the afternoon, especially if we're looking to limit their calories? It turns out that the combination of cheese and raw veggies like broccoli, carrots and sliced peppers may be the best option from both a nutrient standpoint and a satiety one.

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News
10:51 am
Mon December 17, 2012

Obama: 'We Have Wept With You'

President Barack Obama speaks at a memorial service for victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. "I come to offer the love and prayers of a nation," he told the crowd in Newtown, Conn., Sunday.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 11:27 am

  • Listen: President Obama at Newtown, Conn., Memorial Service

President Obama grieved with the community of Newtown, Conn., Sunday night, telling residents at a memorial service that he was there to assure those who lost loved ones in Friday's brutal attack "that you're not alone in your grief, that our world too has been torn apart — that all across this land of ours, we have wept with you."

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The Two-Way
10:15 am
Mon December 17, 2012

Details Of Newtown Shootings 'Too Difficult To Discuss' Now, Police Say

Connecticut State Police spokesman Lt. J. Paul Vance.
Eric Thayer Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 7:51 pm

As new pieces of information come in about Friday's mass shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., which left 20 children and six adults dead, we'll post them here.

The day began, just after 10 a.m. ET, with Connecticut State Police Lt. J. Paul Vance telling reporters that most of the emerging evidence is "too difficult to discuss ... I'm not going to lie to you."

Update at 6:49 p.m. ET. Dogs Try To Comfort Students.

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The Two-Way
9:06 am
Mon December 17, 2012

S.C. Governor To Name Sen. DeMint's Replacement Today

Gov. Nikki Haley named Rep. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) to replace retiring Sen. Jim DeMint. In this file photo, Scott makes brief remarks after a meeting with Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner at the U.S. Capitol on June 2, 2011.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 1:02 pm

Saying that her choice understands the business sector and is the "right U.S. senator for our state and our country," South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley named Republican Rep. Tim Scott to replace the retiring Sen. Jim DeMint (also a Republican) at a noontime news conference today.

After asking those gathered at the state capitol to pause for a moment of silence to honor the victims of Friday's shootings in Newtown, Conn., Scott said he's honored and excited "for many, many reasons."

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The Two-Way
8:43 am
Mon December 17, 2012

Top Stories: Tragedy In Conn.; 'Fiscal Cliff' Talks Continue

Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images
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The Two-Way
7:59 am
Mon December 17, 2012

For Conn. Teacher Who Lives Near Tragedy, Today's Classes Will Be Difficult

Signs of support outside Kyle Mangieri's home in Newtown, Conn.
Brigid Bergin WNYC
  • From 'Morning Edition'

The tragedy in Newtown, Conn., touches people in many different ways. On Morning Edition and at WNYC.org, the station's Brigid Bergin tells the story of Kyle Mangieri, a 7th grade social studies teacher at a school in nearby Fairfield, Conn.

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Around the Nation
7:32 am
Mon December 17, 2012

Holiday Display Called 'Sensory Explosion'

There are Christmas displays, and then there's the one in Wall Township, N.J. It has synchronized lights, lasers, fog machines, strobe lights, 20-foot flames and the music of the Trans Siberian Orchestra. There's no charge — they only accept donations for a local charity.

Around the Nation
7:26 am
Mon December 17, 2012

Police Officer Helps Motorist Register Car

Hayden Carlo was recently pulled over near Dallas for having an expired registration sticker. He said he had a choice: either feed his kids or get a new registration. The officer issued a citation, and when Carlo unfolded it, he found $100.

The Two-Way
7:15 am
Mon December 17, 2012

Funerals Begin In Newtown, Investigation Continues

Stuffed animals and a sign calling for prayer lay at the base of a tree near the Newtown Village Cemetery in Newtown, Conn., on Monday, in remembrance of the victims of the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 3:10 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': The story so far
  • On 'Morning Edition': President Obama expresses nation's grief

Six-year-olds Jack Pinto and Noah Pozner — two of the 20 first-graders killed Friday when a gunman stormed Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. — are to be remembered at funeral services this afternoon.

Jack loved sports and was said to be a big fan of New York Giants wide receiver Victor Cruz, who wrote the boy's name on the cleats — along with the words "My Hero" — he wore Sunday.

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NPR Story
5:09 am
Mon December 17, 2012

Why Tragedies Alter Risk Perception

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 5:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

After the tragedy in Newtown, Connecticut on Friday, many parents dropping their kids off at school this morning are facing a lot of anxiety. Today in Your Health, we asked NPR's science correspondent Shankar Vedantam to come by to talk about how tragedies shape our perceptions of risk.

Shankar, good morning.

SHANKAR VEDANTAM, BYLINE: Good morning, David.

GREENE: So tell us what we know from school shootings of the past. I mean, what sort of impact will this tragedy have on parents and how they think?

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