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Business
4:48 am
Fri May 18, 2012

Hewlett-Packard Set To Layoff 30,000 People

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:49 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with layoffs at HP.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Technology giant Hewlett-Packard is poised to eliminate as many as 30,000 jobs worldwide. These cuts, though, will reportedly spare China - the company's largest source of growth, as well as its research and development divisions.

NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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Asia
4:48 am
Fri May 18, 2012

Previewing New Series On Mineral-Rich Mongolia

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:49 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's get a sneak preview, now, of a coming attraction.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BELOVED OTTER-COLORED HORSE")

INSKEEP: Mongolia is the land of Genghis Khan and nomadic herders.

(SOUNDBITE OF SHEEP)

INSKEEP: And it's also now riding a mining boom.

(SOUNDBITE OF INDUSTRIAL CRASH AND HORNS)

INSKEEP: All next week, NPR's Frank Langfitt takes us to Mongolia where the rush to extract mineral resources is transforming a nomadic culture.

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Election 2012
4:48 am
Fri May 18, 2012

GOP Group Abandons Racially Tinged Attack Ad

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:49 pm

Mitt Romney is disavowing a plan by some wealthy Republicans to attack President Obama for ties to his controversial former pastor. Even the people behind that proposal said they are abandoning it after their idea was plastered on the front page of The New York Times.

The proposal centered on the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, who was a mentor to Obama before the two parted ways during the last presidential campaign.

Republicans unaffiliated with Romney were considering spending $10 million on a racially tinged advertising campaign tying Wright to the president.

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Business
4:48 am
Fri May 18, 2012

Facebook To Begin Trading On Nasdaq

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:49 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL RINGING)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

There you have it, the sound of money. Mark Zuckerberg rang the opening bell for the NASDAQ stock exchange this morning. Facebook, his company, is going public today. The company's shares start trading under the ticker symbol FB. And we talked about one of the largest IPOs, initial public offerings, in history with NPR's Steve Henn.

OK. When we say one of the largest in history, how big is it here?

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NPR Story
4:34 am
Fri May 18, 2012

French President To Meet With Obama

Newly installed French President Francois Hollande and his partner, Valerie Trierweiler, leave the presidential Elysee Palace in Paris after a formal handover ceremony Tuesday.
Lionel Bonaventure AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 10:19 pm

Valerie Trierweiler is a journalist and a twice-divorced mother of three teenage boys. She never thought she'd also end up as the first lady of France.

Americans will get their first close-up look at the woman who now calls France's Elysee Palace home when she and her partner, President Francois Hollande, visit the White House this afternoon.

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NPR Story
4:32 am
Fri May 18, 2012

Did Bank's Culture Lead To JPMorgan's Big Loss?

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:49 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The head of JPMorgan Chase, Jamie Dimon, has gotten an invitation to testify in front of the Senate Banking Committee about his bank's recent trading loss of at least $2 billion.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Dimon is very much the public face of his firm. In a Wall Street culture where banks are defined as much by the executives who run them is by the assets they hold. So, what kind of culture led to the multibillion dollar losses at JPMorgan Chase?

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NPR Story
4:32 am
Fri May 18, 2012

Remembering Disco Queen Donna Summer

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:49 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's take a moment, now, to remember Donna Summer. She died of cancer yesterday at age 63.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Boston native, a 10-year-old soloist in her church choir, grew up to make music that defined the dance floor, the poolside, and the beach in the 1970s and '80s.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BAD GIRLS")

DONNA SUMMER: (Singing) Bad girls, talking 'bout the sad girls. Sad girls, talking 'bout bad, bad girls, yeah.

GREENE: And she was known as the Queen of Disco.

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Planet Money
3:20 am
Fri May 18, 2012

The Long, Long, Long Road To New Rules For Banks

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:49 pm

Would that big, bad JPMorgan Chase trade have violated the Volcker Rule?

It's too soon to say, despite the fact that the rule is part of a two-year-old law.

The Volcker Rule bans deposit-taking banks from making speculative bets. But it allows banks to make investments to hedge risks.

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Africa
3:18 am
Fri May 18, 2012

U.S. Serves Up New Food Security Effort In Africa

A woman refills her bucket from a well in the south of Mauritania. The Sahel region, south of the Sahara, is facing a third season of drought.
Pablo Tosco AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:49 pm

The Obama administration is announcing a major new initiative to boost investments in rural Africa in hopes of lifting millions out of poverty. Several African leaders are in Washington, D.C., for the announcement, which comes as President Obama hosts leaders of the Group of Eight in Maryland. Food security is a key agenda item.

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Around the Nation
3:17 am
Fri May 18, 2012

Son Fulfills Dream Racism Denied To His Mother

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:49 pm

When Terry Walls of Springfield, Mo., decided to go back to college at age 52, he wanted to put to rest a family rumor. He had heard his mother was denied admission to Missouri State University, and he was pointed toward Meyer Library on the MSU campus for answers.

There, he discovered an eloquent letter typed on fragile, onion-skin paper and signed with his mother's maiden name: Mary Jean Price. It was dated Oct. 2, 1950, and it was addressed to the university registrar:

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The Two-Way
3:16 am
Fri May 18, 2012

Bike To Work Day: Your Photos, And Riding Advice From Grant Petersen

Jennifer Drake and her daughter, Alex, pause before their morning ride. "My daughter and I bike to school (her work) 3 miles roundtrip daily," Drake writes.
@JennLDrake

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 10:18 pm

For many people, Bike to Work Day (which is today) is a reason to put air in their bike's tires and see if their chain is too rusty to get them to work on time. And as a growing list of photographs shows, many people who follow NPR online also ride to work.

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Space
3:13 am
Fri May 18, 2012

NASA, SpaceX Aim To Launch Private Era In Orbit

NASA and SpaceX partnered closely to make the mission to the International Space Station possible. Above, the SpaceX control room.
SpaceX

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:49 pm

A private spaceship owned by a company called SpaceX is scheduled to blast off from Cape Canaveral in Florida early Saturday morning.

If all goes well, the unmanned capsule will rocket up on a mission to deliver food and other supplies to the International Space Station, becoming the first commercial spacecraft to visit the outpost.

The highly anticipated mission could mark the beginning of what some say could be a new era in spaceflight, with private companies operating taxi services that could start taking people to orbit in just a few years.

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StoryCorps
11:09 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

Love At First Punch: Still Going Strong After 75 Years

The Dubrow's Cafeteria on Eastern Parkway in New York, circa 1945. Van and Shirley Harris were regulars at the restaurant, along with a colorful cast of characters.
Brian Merlis and Eve Lyons

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:49 pm

Van Harris and his wife, Shirley, grew up in the same Brooklyn neighborhood. They lived about a block away from each other. At StoryCorps, they talked of how they first met — 75 years ago.

Van, 87, recalls the day that he first noticed Shirley, 85.

"I met her when she was about 10 years old, and she was beating up a couple of guys," he says. "The boys had taken her hat off her head, and they were tossing it around."

Shirley kept asking the boys to give her hat back, but they wouldn't do it.

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Law
8:18 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

Clemens' Former Trainer Admits Changing Testimony

Brian McNamee, Roger Clemens' one-time trainer, leaves federal court in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:49 pm

The prosecution's star witness underwent a withering cross-examination on Thursday at Roger Clemens' perjury trial. Clemens, a seven-time Cy Young Award winner, is charged with lying to Congress when he testified that he never used performance-enhancing drugs. Brian McNamee, his one-time trainer, is the only witness who has firsthand evidence that contradicts the baseball-pitching ace.

Earlier this week, guided by the prosecution, McNamee testified in agonizing and repetitive detail about how he injected Clemens with steroids and human growth hormone between 1998 and 2001.

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Law
7:16 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

New Documents Released In Trayvon Martin Case

Documents have been released in the investigation of George Zimmerman's shooting of Trayvon Martin. Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch captain, shot Martin, an unarmed teen. He's claiming self-defense. Robert Siegel talks to Greg Allen.

The Fracking Boom: Missing Answers
6:01 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

Pennsylvania Doctors Worry Over Fracking 'Gag Rule'

Plastic surgeon Amy Pare says it's important for doctors to know what kind of substances patients she's treating might have been exposed to.
Susan Philips WHYY

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 7:30 pm

From WHYY

A new law in Pennsylvania has doctors nervous.

The law grants physicians access to information about trade-secret chemicals used in natural gas drilling. Doctors say they need to know what's in those formulas in order to treat patients who may have been exposed to the chemicals.

But the new law also says that doctors can't tell anyone else — not even other doctors — what's in those formulas. It's being called the "doctor gag rule."

'I Don't Know If It's Due To Exposure'

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The Two-Way
5:35 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

New Evidence Released: Trayvon Martin Had Traces Of Pot In System

A photocopy of a picture of George Zimmerman taken the night of the shooting.
Sanford Police

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 10:06 pm

A huge trove of documents has been released by prosecutors in the Trayvon Martin case. Among the biggest revelations so far is that the autopsy reveals Martin had THC in his system. But police said the shooting was "ultimately avoidable."

ABC News, which is digging through the documents, reports:

"The autopsy report shows traces of the drug THC, which is found in marijuana, in Martin's blood and urine.

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The Record
5:29 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

The Many Voices Of Donna Summer

"Queen of Disco" Donna Summer performs in 1979. (Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:36 pm

Pop singer Donna Summer, whose long career began in the 1960s and reached its apex in the disco era of the '70s, died of cancer on Thursday at her home in Naples, Florida. Summer was 63 years old. According to Billboard magazine, the singer born LaDonna Gaines had 32 singles that charted in the Hot 100. Fourteen of them made it into the top 10. To hear Sami Yenigun's appreciation of Donna Summer's life and career, as heard on All Things Considered, click the audio link.

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It's All Politics
5:12 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

Billionaire Donor Joe Ricketts: From Behind The Scenes To Center Stage

Joe Ricketts, whose American Film Company produced The Conspirator, arrives at the film's premiere during the Toronto International Film Festival in 2010.
Alberto E. Rodriguez Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 9:04 am

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Research News
5:10 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

Ancient Deep-Sea Bacteria Are In No Hurry To Eat

Researcher Hans Roy opens a core sample taken from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. A core sample like this one contained bacteria that settled on the seafloor 86 million years ago.
Bo Barker Jorgensen Science/AAAS

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 7:16 pm

Back when the dinosaurs ruled the Earth, some hardy bacteria took up residence at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. Eighty six million years later, they're still there. And a new study says they're living out the most Spartan lifestyle known on this planet.

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