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It's All Politics
9:53 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr.'s Office Pressured To Release Details About Condition

Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., thanks supporters at his primary election night party in Chicago on March 20.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 10:09 pm

A source close to Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., says his staff or doctors could provide more information on the condition of the congressman as early as today, NPR's David Schaper reports.

Jackson took a leave of absence a month ago, but his office has been vague about the circumstances.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Holy Cow! Family Finds Baseball Card Collection That May Fetch $3 Million

Two of the most valuable cards in the collection: Ty Cobb (left) and Honus "Hans" Wagner.
Heritage Auctions

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 5:33 pm

"My grandfather stuck it in the attic a hundred years ago and here it is now, a blessing to his grandchildren."

A blessing for sure.

As the Toledo Blade reports, when Karl Kissner and his cousins were clearing out his grandfather's home in Defiance, Ohio, on Feb. 29 they came across a box of very rare and very valuable baseball cards.

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The Two-Way
7:49 am
Wed July 11, 2012

In Scranton, Pa., City Workers Sue Over Having Wages Slashed

Roger Leonard, a heavy equipment operator for the city of Scranton, Pa., saw his pay plunge to $340 from about $900 for two weeks' work after the mayor cut city-employee pay to minimum wage.
Jeff Brady NPR

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 10:32 am

The city of Scranton, Penn. now faces two federal lawsuits over a decision last week to slash public employee's pay to minimum wage. Unions representing the city's workers also are asking Lackawanna County Judge Michael Barrasse to hold Mayor Chris Doherty in contempt of court.

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Around the Nation
7:33 am
Wed July 11, 2012

City Of Brotherly Love Has A Different Kind Of Cupid

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Two-Way
7:22 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Episcopal Church OKs Same-Sex Blessings; Largest U.S. Denomination To Do So

The rings of Michael Johnson and Michael Roberts of New York City stood ready before their marriage ceremony at the Manhattan City Clerk's Office in July 2011.
Craig Ruttle AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 11:54 am

With a vote Tuesday evening by its House of Deputies, the Episcopal Church became the largest U.S. denomination so far "to officially sanction same-sex relationships," as CNN's Belief blog writes.

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Around the Nation
7:11 am
Wed July 11, 2012

eHarmony Has An App For When A Date Goes South

The app simulates a rescue phone call. The app can show a telephone number — a coworker's, your mother's — and a photo of the supposed caller. Although it can't guarantee your date will believe the fake excuse.

NPR Story
5:39 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Phillies' Ballpark Offers Best Vegetarian Delights

They may not be having a great season on the baseball diamond, but the Philadelphia Phillies are in first place with the group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. PETA says Citizens Bank Park has the best vegetarian choices.

NPR Story
5:34 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Romney Campaigns In Conservative Parts Of Colorado

GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney is in Houston Wednesday to address a convention of the NAACP. On Tuesday, he was in Colorado, one of the most hotly contested swing states. Romney, who unexpectedly lost to Rick Santorum in the Colorado caucuses earlier this year, is working to shore up support among the GOP base

NPR Story
5:06 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Manchester United Hopes To Score With Its IPO

Manchester United is the most famous soccer team in the United Kingdom, and one of the world's most popular sports teams. Now its owners are hoping the team's popularity will translate into big bucks. They're planning to sell Manchester United stock on the New York Stock Exchange. Roger Blitz, of the Financial Times, talks to Renee Montagne about the team's IPO.

NPR Story
4:54 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Peter O'Toole Bids Farewell To The Big Screen

Just before his 80th birthday, actor Peter O'Toole announced he is retiring. He has been nominated eight times for Academy Awards but never won. He did receive an honorary Oscar.

Science
4:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Researchers Take Stock Of 2011 Weather

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 6:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Across America people are sweltering through extreme heat this year, continuing a long-term trend of rising temperatures. Inevitably, many are wondering if the scorching heat is due to global warming. Scientists are expected to dig into the data and grapple with that in the months to come. They've already taken a stab at a possible connection with last year's extreme weather events, like the blistering drought in Texas. NPR's Richard Harris reports.

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NPR Story
4:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 6:50 am

The City Council in San Bernardino, Calif., voted Tuesday night to seek Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection, making it the third California city in less than two weeks to make the rare move. The city faces a $45 million budget shortfall.

NPR Story
4:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Google Expected To Pay Fine In Privacy Setting Case

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 5:09 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news. Google and the Federal Trade Commission are near a deal that could result the largest fine for privacy violations ever imposed by that agency.

NPR's Steve Henn has the story.

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NPR Story
4:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 6:57 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The ownership of American pro sports got just a little more international. That's our last word in business today.

Pro basketball's Brooklyn Nets, formerly the New Jersey Nets, are owned by a Russian businessman. An Indonesian media owner possesses part of the Philadelphia 76ers. And now, that same Indonesian man is among the new investors in D.C. United, the pro soccer team. His name is Erick Thohir.

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NPR Story
4:45 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Secrecy Surrounds Jesse Jackson Jr.'s Illness

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 7:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Wednesday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Now to a political mystery in Chicago. Constituents and colleagues are demanding to know more about the whereabouts and condition of Congressman Jesse Jackson, Junior. Jackson took a leave of absence a month ago, but his office has been vague about why. And that lack of information about Jackson is the talk of the town. From Chicago, NPR's David Schaper reports.

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Asia
3:39 am
Wed July 11, 2012

'Hard Questions' Remain In U.S.-Pakistan Relations

Pakistani border guards check trucks heading to Afghanistan, in the tribal area of Khyber last week.
Qazi Rauf AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 4:45 am

A U.S. operation in the mountains near Afghanistan last November killed 24 Pakistani soldiers. Pakistan wanted an apology. The U.S. refused. In response, Pakistan shut down supply routes to Afghanistan for NATO convoys.

After intense talks, two border crossings were reopened last week to convoys for the U.S. and NATO forces.

Pakistan's ambassador in Washington, Sherry Rehman, was at the center of the negotiations. Afterward she called it a moment of great opportunity for the two countries.

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London 2012: The Summer Olympics
3:23 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Women's Field Hockey Aims To End Olympic Drought

Paige Selenski (right) of the United States fights for the ball against two Mexican opponents in a women's field hockey match at last October's Pan American Games in Mexico.
Dario Lopez-Mills AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 4:45 am

As one of the world's most popular sports, field hockey produces celebrities in Argentina, the Netherlands and Australia. But the sport is relatively obscure in the United States, where members of the women's national team receive a small monthly stipend and their notoriety comes from outside the country.

Later this month, the group heads to London, where it will try to earn the first American medal in the sport in 28 years.

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Economy
3:22 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Euro Currency Still Faring Well, For Now

Over the last 13 years, the euro has been worth on average $1.21, only a penny less than its current price of $1.22 per euro.
Michael Probst AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 12:42 pm

The euro touched a two-year low against the dollar Tuesday, as concerns about the eurozone debt crisis continued.

Despite a recession across much of the eurozone and even predictions of the currency's demise, however, the euro has held up relatively well during this crisis.

Over the last 13 year, it has taken on average $1.21 to buy a euro. Now, even in this midst of this crisis, it's worth virtually the same ($1.22).

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World
3:21 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Spanish Families Share Expenses And Tradition

A woman pushes a pram though the Plaza de Murillo on July 3 in Madrid. Spain's custom for multiple families to live under the same roof has tied them closer together as well as their wallets. The country has the highest unemployment rate in the Eurozone, and government benefits help aid those out of work.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 9:48 pm

What used to be a Spanish tradition is now becoming more of an economic necessity.

In Spain, the social safety net that helps people survive the economic crisis has two parts: government benefits and close family ties. The country has the highest rate in Europe of multi-generational families all living together.

With a quarter of Spaniards out of work, more parents pick up their kids from school themselves, in the middle of what would have been a workday.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:21 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Will Medicaid Bring The Uninsured Out Of The Woodwork?

Texas Gov. Rick Perry is the latest state executive to say no to an expansion of Medicaid.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:54 pm

Ever since the Supreme Court decided last month that an expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act should be optional, quite a few Republican governors have been vowing to take a pass.

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