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The Two-Way
3:14 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

Four More Charged In Border Patrol Killing Linked To 'Fast And Furious'

With wanted posters off to the side, James L. Turgal, Jr., right, FBI Special Agent in Charge, listens as Laura E. Duffy, United States Attorney Southern District of California, announces the indictments on five suspects involved in the death of U.S. Border Patrol agent Brian Terry on Monday.
Ross D. Franklin AP

The Justice Department has unsealed criminal charges against four more people it says are connected to the death of U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry, as the FBI offered a $1 million reward for information leading to the capture of the fugitives.

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World Cafe
3:01 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

Next: Family Band

Family Band.
Andrea Gentl
  • Hear two new songs by Family Band

Guitarist Jonny Ollsin (formerly of S.T.R.E.E.T.S.) and singer Kim Krans met in the Catskill Mountains in New York, where they continue to write and record in a hand-built log cabin. Together, they lead the Brooklyn ambient rock group Family Band, which sounds like anything but mountain music.

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World Cafe
3:01 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

Sharon Van Etten On World Cafe

Sharon Van Etten.
Elisabeth Vitale

Sharon Van Etten's raspy, elegant vocals and deeply confessional folk-rock have made her a rising star. Ever since her official debut in 2009, the heart-breakingly intimate Because I Was In Love, Van Etten has been expanding her sound and adding grit to her delivery.

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AIDS: A Turning Point
2:37 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

Teen Years Pose New Risks For Kids Born With HIV

A boy waits to get his anti-AIDS drugs from pharmacist Rajesh Chandra at the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Center of Excellence in Gaborone.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 11:33 pm

The southern African nation of Botswana is grappling with a relatively new problem in the evolving AIDS pandemic: It now has a large group of HIV-positive adolescents.

The teenagers were infected at birth before Botswana managed to almost wipe out mother-to-child transmission of the virus. These children have survived because of a public health system that provides nearly universal access to powerful anti-AIDS drugs.

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The Two-Way
2:33 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

PHOTO: A New Panoramic View Of Mars

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took this panoramic view of the planet between Dec. 2011 and May.
NASA

NASA has released a new, stunning panoramic image of Mars. The scene is stitched from 817 images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from Dec. 2011 to May.

To do the image justice, you have to download the hi-resolution version, but be warned it's close to 14 MB.

Here's how NASA describes the scene:

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Shots - Health Blog
2:11 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

Texas Gov. Perry Says No To Medicaid Expansion

Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 4:31 pm

Any doubt, and there probably wasn't much, that Texas would reject an expansion of Medicaid under the big federal health law was dispelled today.

The Supreme Court decision on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act allows states to opt out of the expansion without losing all federal Medicaid funding. Only the federal money that would have gone toward the expansion is affected.

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The Two-Way
2:10 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

2.97 Million And Counting; '66 Volvo Is Nearing Its 3 Millionth Mile

Irv Gordon in his trusty Volvo P1800S earlier this month.
Seth Wenig AP

"It's just a car I enjoy driving."

That's for sure.

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The Salt
1:45 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

Part Science, Part Art, Pollinator Pathway Connects Seattle Green Spaces

This tiger swallowtail butterfly is a pollinator that could benefit from a little more green space.
Jim, the Photographer

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 2:34 pm

When we think about improving urban food systems, we tend think about growing more vegetables — densely planted backyard plots and community gardens, with tiny tomatoes ripening in the sun. But according to some experts, we should start thinking smaller — way smaller — as in bugs.

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The Two-Way
1:21 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

Lance Armstrong Sues To Block U.S. Anti-Doping Hearing

Lance Armstrong competes in the Ironman Panama 70.3. triathlon in Panama City, Panama.
Arnulfo Franco AP

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 6:05 pm

Update at 5:58 p.m. ET. Lawsuit Dismissed:

A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit filed by Lance Armstrong that sought to stop a USADA hearing into accusations of doping. The AP reports:

"U.S. District Judge Sam Sparks ruled just hours later. He criticized Armstrong's attorneys for filing an 80-page complaint the judge says seems more intended to whip up public opinion for his case than focus on the legal argument.

"Sparks, however, did not decide on the merits of Armstrong's case and said he can refile his lawsuit."

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The Two-Way
12:17 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

Libya May Buck Arab Spring Trend And Elect Moderate Prime Minister

Mahmoud Jibril speaks to in Tripoli, Libya on Sunday.
Manu Brabo AP

Over the weekend, about 1.7 million Libyans cast a ballot to choose a prime minister. Like Tunisia and Egypt before it, these elections are the first free elections since a revolution toppled the country's dictator.

Moammar Gadhafi ruled since 1969. As Reuters reports, while there were some violent incidents and anti-vote protests, international observers gave the election process a thumbs up.

Reuters reports:

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Shots - Health Blog
11:58 am
Mon July 9, 2012

Virus Suspected In Mysterious Cambodian Outbreak

A Cambodian doctor examines a child at Kantha Bopha Children's Hospital in Phnom Penh.
Khem Sovannara AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 4:41 pm

An investigation into a perplexing outbreak among young kids in Cambodia is getting traction.

Doctors have identified a potential cause, a virus associated with hand, foot and mouth disease. (The illness is not foot-and-mouth disease, which affects only animals.)

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Author Interviews
11:46 am
Mon July 9, 2012

'The Life That Follows' Disarming IEDs In Iraq

Brian Castner served as an Explosive Ordnance Disposal officer in the U.S. Air Force from 1999 to 2007, deploying to Iraq to command bomb disposal units in Balad and Kirkuk in 2005 and 2006.
Joey Campagna Courtesy of the author

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 2:46 pm

Brian Castner arguably had one of the most nerve-wracking jobs in the U.S. military. He commanded two Explosive Ordnance Disposal units in Iraq, where his team disabled roadside IEDs, investigated the aftermath of roadside car bombings and searched door to door to uncover bomb-makers at their homes.

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The Two-Way
11:33 am
Mon July 9, 2012

Romney Raised $106 Million In June; Obama Raised $71 Million

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney on July 4 in Wolfeboro, N.H.
Kayana Szymczak Getty Images

For the second month in a row, Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney and his party have raised more money than the Democratic incumbent, President Obama.

Romney and his fellow Republicans hauled in $106 million in June for his presidential campaign, well above the $71 million raised by the president's campaign and Democrats. Both campaigns released their fundraising figures for the month earlier today.

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Africa
11:18 am
Mon July 9, 2012

1-Year-Old South Sudan: Potential To Be Harnessed

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 12:04 pm

Transcript

MARIA HINOJOSA, HOST:

I'm Maria Hinojosa and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, violence continues to erupt across Syria. We'll talk to a human rights activist who has seen it firsthand. That's in a few minutes.

But first, a year ago today on July 9, 2011, the world's newest nation was born in Africa.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: We hereby declare Southern Sudan to be an independent and sovereign state.

(APPLAUSE)

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Science
10:51 am
Mon July 9, 2012

Tell the World Your Big Idea With NPR's 'What's Your Big Idea?' Video Contest

NPR

Originally published on Sun August 19, 2012 3:22 pm

I have a simple question for you: Do you have a good idea? Something that could change the world?

Enter your big idea in NPR's "What's Your Big Idea?" video contest from July 9 to Aug. 12, 2012, and you could win the chance to get advice on making your big idea a reality from a big name in science and technology. And even if you don't win that grand prize, we'll showcase your video on NPR's YouTube channel and on Facebook.

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It's All Politics
10:46 am
Mon July 9, 2012

Sit And Talk A While: Filmmaker Chronicling Personal Side Of Politics

Preacher Eddie Brackett is interviewed by filmmaker Julie Winokur at the Waughtown Baptist Church in Winston-Salem, N.C. "I say that I'm a conservative, but I think that I am very open-minded to meeting the needs of the people that are out there," Brackett said.
Courtesy of Julie Turkewitz

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 3:44 pm

When I caught up with filmmaker Julie Winokur recently, she was in Atlanta, about to watch her 17-year-old son play baseball.

This is the same son who earlier this year called her the most "intolerant person" he knew.

"I couldn't let it go," she said. "I always thought I had a lot of empathy."

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The Two-Way
10:19 am
Mon July 9, 2012

'Mystery Woman' And Disney Ripoffs: Latest News About North Korea's Leader

An image from a video posted by StimmeKoreas, which in turn came from North Korea official media, showing some of the dancing (fake) Disney characters at Friday's performance.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 10:29 am

Two story lines are emerging from reports about a concert staged Friday in Pyongyang, North Korea, at which new leader Kim Jong Un had a front-row seat:

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The Two-Way
8:02 am
Mon July 9, 2012

In Afghanistan: Bomb Kills Six Americans; Shocking Video Of Woman's Execution

A screen grab from the video of a public execution reportedly carried out last month in Afghanistan. The victim is sitting with her back to the executioner, who is at left.
Agence France Presse

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 11:16 am

"In what was an extraordinarily violent day even by Afghan standards, separate incidents on Sunday killed seven Western troops, including six Americans who died in a single blast, along with five Afghan police officers and at least 18 civilians," the Los Angeles Times writes.

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The Record
7:56 am
Mon July 9, 2012

Conquering Reverb: Behind Recorded Music's Oldest Sound Effect

Reverb is a natural phenomenon, but sound engineers have been finding artificial ways to reproduce it since the 1940s.
niknikon iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:33 pm

Accounts vary on the first use of artificial reverb, but the most widely acknowledged origin story just turned 65. That was the harmonica instrumental "Peg O' My Heart," and it was a No. 1 hit in the summer of 1947. It owes its hypnotic tone to a crafty production trick.

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