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Asia
4:00 am
Mon April 9, 2012

Leaders' Meeting Boosts India-Pakistan Relations

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 10:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A brief encounter between two leaders has raised hope for better relations between India and Pakistan. India's prime minister hosted Pakistan's president and accepted a return invitation to travel to Pakistan. We talk here of two nuclear-armed rivals whose relations were even worse than usual, after Pakistani militants attacked Mumbai in 2008. And the meeting came as disaster struck Pakistani troops facing Indian soldiers in the Himalayas.

NPR's Julie McCarthy is going to talk us through all this. Hi, Julie.

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Remembrances
4:00 am
Mon April 9, 2012

CBS Newsman Mike Wallace Dies At 93

Over the weekend, 60 Minutes correspondent Mike Wallace died in Connecticut. Wallace, a star of that CBS news magazine for 40 years, stood out because of his seeming willingness to ask anybody anything. In 2005, he sat down for an interview with Steve Inskeep.

Sports
4:00 am
Mon April 9, 2012

3-0 Mets Surprise New York Baseball Fans

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 10:15 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

With college basketball and the Master's behind us, many sports fans are turning their attention to baseball. We are through the first weekend of the Major League regular season, and already there are some early surprises. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins us to talk about that.

Good morning.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Renee.

MONTAGNE: Let's start with the city of New York, where the two teams are doing a bit of a role reversal.

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Business
4:00 am
Mon April 9, 2012

Business News

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with labor woes at AT&T.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: AT&T and union officials have agreed to extend contract negotiations, preventing a mass walkout by some 40,000 unionized workers. The deadline to agree on the new contract had been yesterday. AT&T is seeking concessions from its workers, including cuts in pension contributions, and also an increase in health care premiums. The union is calling those concessions unrealistic.

Your Money
3:36 am
Mon April 9, 2012

What Do You Owe In Taxes? Depends Who's Counting

Which tax preparation service is best? That's what writer Joel Stein hoped to find out when he took his 2011 income data to different firms — including an H&R Block office, seen here in a file photo from last year's tax season.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 12:58 pm

In 2012, the federal tax return deadline is Tuesday, April 17 — so if you haven't already filed your income tax return, you have about one week left to shop around for different options to finish your taxes, or request an extension.

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Middle East
3:35 am
Mon April 9, 2012

Defected Soldiers Offer Insider's View Of Syrian Army

A Syrian soldier who defected and joined the Free Syrian Army sits at an outpost near the village of Janudieh. Some defectors say the military is committing atrocities, but that the rebels are fighting back with their own brutality.
AFP/Getty Images

Since the uprising began in Syria last year, there have been a lot of stories about soldiers who have defected from the army to join the rebels. This rebel group is loosely known as the Free Syrian Army, and it's starting to look more and more like an insurgency.

Not all soldiers who leave the army, however, decide to join these rebels. Those who simply escape the army altogether offer a rare glimpse into a military they say is committing unspeakable atrocities and a rebel force that's fighting back with its own brutality.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:34 am
Mon April 9, 2012

Wider Use Of Breast Cancer Radiation Technique Raises Concern

This illustration shows a device made by MammoSite used to deliver targeted doses of radiation as part of brachytherapy.
Courtesy Radiological Society of North America

When Lisa Galloway was trying to decide what kind of radiation treatment to undergo after surgery for early breast cancer, she jumped at the chance to get a newer, quicker approach.

Instead of dragging on for weeks, the newer form of radiation, called brachytherapy, only takes five days.

"Five days compared to 33 days, I was like, 'Yay!' " says Galloway, 53, of Silver Spring, Md. "So I wanted it so badly. I got it — I got my wish."

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U.S.
3:25 am
Mon April 9, 2012

For-Profit Schools Under Fire For Targeting Veterans

Iraq war veteran Paul Rieckhoff (right), with Democratic Sens. Mark Begich of Alaska, Daniel Akaka of Hawaii and Patty Murray of Washington, introduces the GI benefit watchdog bill in Washington. Some lawmakers say for-profit schools are taking advantage of veterans and their educational benefits.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 1:27 pm

Hundreds of thousands of veterans have returned from Iraq and Afghanistan in recent years, eager to get an education under the new post-Sept. 11 GI Bill.

Many vets looking for a school find they are inundated by sales pitches from institutions hungry for their government benefits. Now, lawmakers are looking for ways to protect vets without narrowing their education choices.

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Asia
3:22 am
Mon April 9, 2012

Exposing Indonesia's Cold War Communist Purge

Indonesian President Sukarno (left) surrenders his executive powers to Gen. Suharto, Feb. 22, 1967, in Jakarta. Suharto led the anti-communist purge and ruled the country until 1998.
AP

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 11:29 am

The wall of silence in Indonesia surrounding one of the worst atrocities of the 20th century is beginning to fall apart. A forthcoming report by Indonesia's National Commission on Human Rights estimates that a purge of suspected communists during the mid-1960s killed between 600,000 and 1 million people.

The violence reshaped Indonesia's political landscape and affected the course of the Cold War, just as the U.S. was escalating its fight against communism in Southeast Asia.

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Around the Nation
2:35 am
Mon April 9, 2012

'Premature' To Call Tulsa Shootings Hate Crimes

Alvin Watts (left), 33, and Jacob England, 19, were arrested following an appeal to the public to help police solve the five shootings that happened Friday. A police spokesman said the two face three counts of first-degree murder and two counts of shooting with intent to kill.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 10:15 am

Police in Tulsa, Okla., say it is much too early in their investigation to describe the murder of three black residents and the wounding of two others as a hate crime. Two men were arrested early Sunday morning and are expected to face charges of first-degree murder and shooting with intent to kill.

Soon after Friday's shooting, authorities reached out to the public for help. Police Maj. Walter Evans, the head of a task force looking into the murders, says information started pouring in shortly after that.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:08 am
Mon April 9, 2012

Study Warns Of Autism Risk For Children Of Obese Mothers

A pregnant woman measures her stomach.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 9:18 am

Scientists have found one more reason that pregnancy and obesity can be a bad combination.

A new study in the journal Pediatrics suggests that moms who are obese or have diabetes are more likely to have a child with autism or another developmental problem.

The finding is "worrisome in light of this rather striking epidemic of obesity" in the U.S., says Irva Hertz-Picciotto from the MIND Institute at the University of California, Davis, one of the study's authors.

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Health
5:31 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

Cochlear Implants Redefine What It Means To Be Deaf

A schoolboy with a cochlear implant listens to his teacher during lessons at a school for the hearing impaired in Germany. The implants have dramatically changed the way deaf children learn and transition out of schools for the deaf and into classrooms with non-disabled students.
Eckehard Schulz AP

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 5:32 pm

There was a time when a child born deaf had few choices. For more than a century, the only option for parents was to send their son or daughter away to a boarding school for the deaf. There, the children and the schools thrived in the shadows, embracing a distinct culture of silent communication.

Recent advances in medicine and technology are now reshaping what it means to be deaf in America. Children who could never hear a sound are now adults who can hear everything. That's having a dramatic impact on the nation's historic deaf schools as well as the lives of people.

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Monkey See
4:57 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

Lena Dunham's 'Girls': Still Sex, Still The City, Different Show

Lena Dunham stars in HBO's new series, Girls, premiering April 15.
Jojo Whilden HBO

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 8:15 am

Lena Dunham's new series Girls debuts on HBO on April 15. Dunham, who got quite a bit of attention for being the star, director and writer of the 2010 indie film Tiny Furniture, fills the same three roles in this ensemble show about four young women in New York.

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Author Interviews
3:37 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

Ignore 'The Mama's Boy Myth': Keep Your Boys Close

Author Kate Stone Lombardi is the recipient of six Clarion awards. She has written for The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.
Nancy Borowick

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 7:16 pm

There are plenty of pop culture references to the dangers of a close mother-son relationship. From the myth of Oedipus to the movie Psycho, narrative after narrative harps on the idea that mothers can damage their sons, make them weak, awkward and dependent.

But for millions of men, the opposite has turned out to be true, author Kate Lombardi tells NPR's Laura Sullivan. Lombardi — a mother herself — is the author of the new book, The Mama's Boy Myth: Why Keeping Our Sons Close Makes Them Stronger.

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Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

Suspects Arrested In Okla. Shootings

Two men have been arrested in connection with the shooting deaths of three people in Tulsa, Okla., last Friday. Amanda Bland, a reporter for the Tulsa World, discusses the arrests.

The Two-Way
2:48 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

Suspects Arrested In Tulsa, Okla., Shootings

Alvin Watts, 32, left, and Jacob England, 19, were arrested following a tip from the public to help police solve the five shootings that happened Friday. A police spokesman said the two face three counts of first degree murder and two counts of shooting with intent to kill.
AFP/Getty Images

Two men were arrested in Tulsa, Okla., on Sunday in connection with the deaths of three people in a shooting spree that terrorized the city's black community and left two others critically wounded.

Jacob England, 19, and Alvin Watts, 32, were arrested following a tip from the public to help police solve the five shootings that happened Friday. Police spokesman Jason Willingham said the two face three counts of first-degree murder and two counts of shooting with intent to kill.

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The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

In Malawi, A Woman In Power, An Economy In Need

Joyce Banda has become Malawi's first woman president after the death of President Bingu wa Mutharika.
Amos Gumulira AFP/Getty Images

Malawi's first female president takes office with a personal history of women's rights advocacy and a long fight ahead. For Joyce Banda, economic empowerment is crucial for women's progress. It is also a nationwide struggle now resting on her shoulders.

Banda, who had been the country's vice president, was sworn in Saturday, following the death of President Bingu wa Mutharika on Thursday.

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Remembrances
11:56 am
Sun April 8, 2012

Veteran Newsman Mike Wallace Of '60 Minutes' Dead

60 Minutes correspondent Mike Wallace died on Saturday night, according to a CBS spokesman.
Peter Freed AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:53 am

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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Sun April 8, 2012

'60 Minutes' Newsman Mike Wallace Has Died

Journalist Mike Wallace
Evan Agostini AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:53 am

Veteran newsman and 60 Minutes founding correspondent Mike Wallace has died at age 93.

Wallace died Saturday night, according to a CBS spokesperson. On the CBS website, colleague Morley Safer is remembering the journalist's career, from Wallace's first appearance on the network to his last. He writes in part:

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Around the Nation
8:00 am
Sun April 8, 2012

The Story Goes On For Trayvon Martin's Hometown

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 12:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

From Tulsa, we move our focus back to the city of Sanford, Florida, where Trayvon Martin, an unarmed African-American teen, was shot and killed six weeks ago by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. The constant spotlight has brought the issue of race to the forefront, and with it some tense moments in that Florida community. NPR's Kathy Lohr spent the last week in Sanford and has this story.

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