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Law
1:12 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Supreme Court Makes 3 Key Rulings

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

It's been a busy morning at the Supreme Court. Justices released several opinions, including a ruling on Arizona's controversial immigration law aimed at cracking down on illegal immigration. That law gave police broad powers to stop suspected illegal immigrants and demand their papers, but civil rights groups said it went too far and gave states too much authority over immigration policy.

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The Two-Way
1:06 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Fukushima Markets Get First Local Seafood Since Nuclear Meltdown

Markets in the port city of Soma, in Fukushima, Japan, are once again selling local seafood. In this file photo, volunteers help clean up a Soma seafood restaurant damaged in last March's tsunami and earthquake.
Hiro Komae AP

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 2:11 pm

Seafood markets in Fukushima, Japan, are being stocked with locally caught products again, as officials seek to reintroduce local fare in the area that was hit by an earthquake, a tsunami and a nuclear meltdown in March of 2011.

The AP reports on the details:

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Postal Workers Begin Four-Day Hunger Strike, Protesting Financial Situation

Cartons of mail ready to be sorted sit on a shelf at the U.S. Post Office sort center in San Francisco, California.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Ten current and retired postal workers began a four-day hunger strike today to protest Congress' interference with the United States' Postal Service.

Specifically, the activists want lawmakers to kill a requirement that the service pre-pay its retiree health care and benefits fund and to approve a refund of surplus pension contributions.

"Not the Internet, not the recession, not private competition, Congress is killing the postal service," Community and Postal Workers United wrote in a statement.

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Opinion
12:26 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Taboo Revival: Talking Private Parts In Public Places

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 8:35 am

Geoff Nunberg is the linguist contributor on NPR's Fresh Air. His new book, Ascent of the A-Word, will be appearing this summer.

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Movie Interviews
12:18 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Alec Baldwin: A 'Rock' Throughout The Ages

Club owner Dennis Dupree (Alec Baldwin, left) and his assistant Lonny Barnett (Russell Brand) try to figure out a way to keep their nightclub open in the movie adaptation of Rock of Ages.
David James David James

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:38 pm

Alec Baldwin stars in two movies this summer — and they couldn't be more different.

In Woody Allen's To Rome with Love, Baldwin joins an ensemble cast including Jesse Eisenberg, Ellen Page, Roberto Benigni and Penelope Cruz as they romp around the Eternal City — running into trouble, weathering existential crises and falling in — and out — of love.

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It's All Politics
12:17 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Supreme Court Says Montana Cannot Ignore Citizens United Ruling

Montana Attorney General Steve Bullock sought to prevent the U.S. Supreme Court's 2010 Citizens United decision from being used to strike down a state law restricting corporate campaign spending. On Monday, the Supreme Court rejected Bullock's argument, holding that "there can be no serious doubt" that Citizens United applies to Montana law.
Matthew Brown AP

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 12:51 pm

The state of Montana has lost a closely watched bid to challenge Citizens United, the 2010 Supreme Court ruling that lets corporations deploy their money to help or attack specific candidates.

Citizens United dramatically loosened the restraints on corporate involvement in political campaigns. It also set strict new limits on what's considered "corruption or the appearance of corruption" when it comes to restricting money in politics.

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The Two-Way
12:09 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Venus Williams Bows Out Of Wimbledon On First Day

Venus Williams stretches for a return in her first-round defeat to Russia's Elena Vesnina on the first day of the Wimbledon Championships. For Williams, 32, it was her earliest exit from Wimbledon in 15 years.
Miguel Medina AFP/Getty Images

Venus Williams has lost in the first round of the Wimbledon Championships, a striking defeat for the five-time winner of the grass-court tournament. She lost to Elena Vesnina of Russia in straight sets, 6-1, 6-3, after failing to establish her serve.

"I have to give credit to her," Williams said. "She made hardly any errors and served well."

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Law
11:55 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Supreme Court Decision, A Rebuke To Arizona?

The Supreme Court threw out key parts of Arizona's tough immigration law. But the court didn't rule on one of the most controversial elements of the law. Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR's Ron Elving, Professor Gabriel Chin with the University of California, Davis, and the vice dean of University of Arizona College of Law, Marc Miller.

Africa
11:55 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Religious Violence Shakes Up Northern Nigeria

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up, who doesn't love a wedding? Marvel Comics just decided to hold a big one for superhero Northstar. We'll find out why even some of his alien mutant friends decided not to show. That's in just a few minutes.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Life Sentences Without Parole For Juveniles Is Unconstitutional, High Court Rules

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 3:40 pm

The United States Supreme Court ruled that an Alabama law that gave juveniles convicted of murder mandatory life sentences without the possibility of parole was unconstitutional.

In the majority opinion, Justice Elena Kagan wrote that the law violated the Eighth Amendment's ban on cruel and unusual punishment.

The AP reports:

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The Salt
11:48 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Struggling Dairy Farmers Find a 'Moo' Business Model

Laura Chase, a member of the MOOMilk dairy cooperative, sweeps her barn in a film still from documentary, Betting The Farm.
Pull-Start Pictures

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 12:08 pm

A year and a half after Aaron Bell lost his contract to sell milk to H.P. Hood LLC from his 45 cow dairy operation in Edmunds, Maine, he found himself leaving a voicemail with his lease agent.

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The Two-Way
9:46 am
Mon June 25, 2012

As Turkey Looks To NATO, Syria Defends Its Downing Of War Plane

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, arrives for a cabinet meeting in his office in Ankara, Turkey on Monday.
AP

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 8:28 am

Update at 3:16 p.m. ET. An Attack On All Of NATO:

The tension between Turkey and Syria has heightened this afternoon. First Turkey said that Syria had fired at another one of its planes; this one was involved in a search rescue operation of the war plane shot down by Syria last week.

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The Two-Way
8:42 am
Mon June 25, 2012

As Celebrations Continue, Morsi Begins Forming Government

Egyptian supporters of their new president-elect, Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohamed Morsi, perform noon prayers in Cairo's Tahrir Square, one day after Morsi was elected as the country's "first civilian president" on Sunday.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 8:52 am

Mohammed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood candidate who became Egypt's president-elect yesterday, began consultations and moved into the office once held by the deposed Hosni Mubarak.

This was a historic weekend for Egypt: Many feared that the ruling military council would give the elections to Ahmed Shafiq, Mubarak's last prime minister. But that didn't happen and when Morsi was handed the victory, hundreds of thousands of Egyptians poured into the streets.

From Cairo, NPR's Grant Clark filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
8:02 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Supreme Court Strikes Down Key Provisions Of Arizona Immigration Law

Waiting for word: The U.S. Supreme Court building.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 2:13 pm

Update at 10:21 a.m. ET. Strikes Down Key Provisions Of Immigration Law:

The United States Supreme Court invalidated three of four challenged provisions of Arizona's controversial immigration law. Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote the majority opinion.

The high court upheld the part of the law that asked police to check the immigration status of those stopped for another violation.

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The Two-Way
7:43 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Moving Slowly In Gulf, Tropical Storm Debby Soaks Florida

High winds, high tide strike at the main street of Cedar Key, Fla., as Tropical Storm Debby makes its way across the Gulf of Mexico on Sunday.
Phil Sandlin AP

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:43 pm

Spinning off the coast, Tropical Storm Debby's effects have already been felt from Georgia south to central Florida, where it dumped rain and spawned some isolated tornadoes.

The path — as has been the case with this storm all along — is still unclear, but the National Hurricane Center expects it to move very slowly and make landfall in Florida in he next few days. At one point, the hurricane center had posted warnings over Louisiana. Those have now been discontinued.

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Around the Nation
6:59 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Ugly Mugly Crowned World's Ugliest Dog

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:54 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Ohio Octogenarians Skydive For Charity

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. George H. W. Bush, the first president Bush, made news since leaving office by jumping out of airplanes. Marjorie Bryan says she'd like to join him sometime. She's 83, and on Saturday she parachuted from a plan over Lima, Ohio, as did 82-year-old Marianna Sherman. They raised money for the Blue Star Mothers, whose kids served in the military. They jumped with a retired sergeant who has accompanied the ex-president in midair. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
5:55 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Famed Tortoise Dies In Galapagos Islands

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And we have a bit of sad news from the Galapagos Islands. The giant tortoise known as Lonesome George, believed to be the last living member of its subspecies - has died. We reported on the tortoise in 2008 when Lonesome George mated with a female from a similar species. The hope was his subspecies would be carried on. But the eggs turned out to be infertile. By tortoise standards, Lonesome George died relatively young. He was believed to be about 100 years old. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Sports
5:55 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Worried By The Debt Crisis, Soccer Distracts Europe

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

You know, if you're weighed down by worry, you find a distraction. That at least is what Europeans are doing amid their economic trouble. They've been turning to their favorite sport - soccer. This weekend saw the last two Euro 2012 quarterfinals. This is a huge competition viewed in Europe, as second only to the World Cup. NPR's Philip Reeves of course has been following the action. He's on the line from London.

Hi, Phil.

PHILIP REEVES, BYLINE: Hi.

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Environment
5:13 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Alaska Glacier Studied For Clues On Water Supply

Researchers measure the Eklutna glacier in Alaska to see how long the water it provides will last. The glacier supplies Anchorage with both drinking water and hydro power.
Annie Feidt for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Anchorage is one of the few North American cities that depend on a glacier for most of their drinking water. The Eklutna glacier also provides some of the city's electricity, through hydro power. So a team of researchers is working to answer a very important question: How long will the glacier's water supply last?

To get that answer, those researchers have to shovel a lot of snow. "It gets to be the consistency of really strong Styrofoam once you get down, maybe six or eight feet," glaciologist Louis Sass says as he flings pristine snow out of a growing hole in the glacier.

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