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The Two-Way
3:39 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

In New York, Hispanic Small Business Owners Must Prove Their Ethnicity

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 4:58 pm

Who is Latino? Who counts as Native American?

The debate over who is considered a minority was brought to the spotlight by the Senate race in Massachusetts. Democratic candidate Elizabeth Warren claimed she had Native American heritage, but there's no records to indicate that. Still, Warren insists that she learned of her background through family stories and that she is proud of her heritage.

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Music Reviews
2:44 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Japandroids: One Part Classic Rock, One Part Punk

Japandroids is guitarist Brian King (left) and drummer David Prowse.
Simone Cecchetti

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 12:39 pm

The rock band Japandroids is two men, not from Tokyo but from Vancouver, British Columbia — guitarist Brian King and drummer David Prowse. Both of them sang and very often shouted on their 2009 LP Post-Nothing, which received a lot of praise from music blogs. Their second album is out now; it's called Celebration Rock, and I think it's the best rock record I've heard this year.

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The Two-Way
2:41 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

PHOTOS: The Enterprise Travels Up The Hudson River To Its New Home

The shuttle was navigated through Coney Island and Staten Island from Jersey City.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

The shuttle Enterprise made a incredible trip up the Hudson River by barge, today. The shuttle was framed by New York City's skyline and eventually it will be hoisted from the barge to its new home at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum.

Here are some pictures from the Enterprise's journey:

Monkey See
2:34 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Ray Bradbury: Finding Our Reflections Where We Didn't Expect Them

This 1966 file photo shows science fiction writer Ray Bradbury looking at a picture that was part of a school project to illustrate characters in one of his dramas.
AP

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 8:19 am

Heinlein, Asimov and Bradbury; they were the tripod (invasive, moving, with lasers) on which my science fiction education was built in the 1970s. This was somewhat self-selected, because once you — or I — grew out of Danny Dunn and Journey to the Mushroom Planet and Tom Swift, Jr., they were the inevitable destinations, the planets with the heaviest gravity wells in the sci-fi solar system.

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The Two-Way
2:11 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Economy Grew At 'Moderate Pace' In April And May, Federal Reserve Says

Anecdotal reports from across the nation "suggest overall economic activity expanded at a moderate pace" from early April through late May, the Federal Reserve just reported.

In its "beige book" review of conditions around the country, the Fed said the only one of its 12 bank districts to report slower growth was Philadelphia.

The report also adds that:

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The Two-Way
1:48 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

The Bush Tax Cuts: Obama's Surrogates Add Confusion To Democratic Position

Former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers speaks during a discussion about tax codes and revenue hosted by the Brookings Institute on May 3 in Washington.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 3:32 pm

Did Larry Summers, the president's first National Economic Council director, just become the second Obama surrogate to stray from the talking points and endorse an extension of the Bush-era tax cuts?

Those tax cuts, which the Obama administration has said it will not extend for the very rich, are due to expire at the end of the year. Along with deep cuts in government spending scheduled to take place at the same time, many have called the end of the year a "fiscal cliff" that would plunge the economy back into recession.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:39 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Commenters Bite Back On The Paleo Diet

Vlad Averbukh, 29, a follower of the paleo diet, eats raw meat along the Hudson River in New York in 2010. (Averbukh did not weigh in on our blog post on the paleo diet.)
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 1:52 pm

Our post on the paleo diet moving from the CrossFit gym to the doctor's office generated a robust discussion here in our comments section (and on NPR's Facebook page).

Readers batted around the relative merits of the paleo diet, how to interpret Paleolithic man's short lifespan and the meaning of evolutionary medicine, among other issues.

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The Two-Way
1:24 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Delta CEO Pushes For National Airline Policy That Lets 'Free Market Work'

A traveler walks by a Delta Airlines skycap kiosk at San Francisco International Airport.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

"Airlines are expecting a banner year," NPR's Yuki Noguchi is due to report on All Things Considered later today.

More planes are flying with full passenger loads, as any frequent flier will tell you. Mergers have helped cut costs. Ticket prices are up. Airlines are charging fees for bags. Fuel costs have eased a bit.

In these relatively good times, what does an airline CEO want?

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Remembrances
12:46 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

The Curious Life Of Futurist Author Ray Bradbury

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 12:07 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Some sad news this morning: The world has lost a literary giant. Author Ray Bradbury died last night after a long illness. He was 91 years old. He wrote such classics as "The Martian Chronicles" and "Fahrenheit 451" - futuristic tales from a man who never used a computer, or even drove a car. NPR's Arnie Seipel has more on Bradbury and his curious life.

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The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Barbara Walters Apologizes For Trying To Help Assad Aide

Barbara Walters attends the "Today" show 60th anniversary celebration at the Edison Ballroom in New York in January.
Evan Agostini AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 1:18 pm

The television journalist Barbara Walters apologized yesterday after leaked emails showed that she offered to help an aide to Syrian President Bashar Assad land a job in the U.S. after the aide helped Walters secure an interview with the despot.

The AP reports:

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Remembrances
12:22 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

'Fahrenheit 451' Author Ray Bradbury Dies At 91

Ray Bradbury's career spanned more than 70 years — during which he transported readers to other dimensions with his futuristic and innovative stories. He died Tuesday at age 91.
Lennox McLendon AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 8:17 pm

Ray Bradbury, author of The Martian Chronicles and Fahrenheit 451, died Tuesday. He was 91. Bradbury was known for his futuristic tales — but he never used a computer, or even drove a car.

Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Ill., in 1920 and grew up during the Great Depression. He said it was a time when people couldn't imagine the future, and his active imagination made him stand out. He once told Fresh Air's Terry Gross about exaggerating basic childhood fears, like monsters at the top of the stairs.

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It's All Politics
12:06 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

California Primary Sets Up Same-Party U.S. House Contests In November

A voter marks her ballot in the California primary in Sacramento on Tuesday.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 1:17 pm

California's new truly open primary held Tuesday could result in single-party matchups in November for eight of the state's 53 U.S. House seats.

While some results remained unofficial Wednesday morning, five congressional districts were certain to have Democrat-vs.-Democrat races on Nov. 6, while a sixth looked likely; two districts could have Republican-vs.-Republican contests.

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Technology
11:54 am
Wed June 6, 2012

The Deleted Tweets Of Politicians Find A New Home

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 1:54 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, could raising the retirement age help preserve Social Security? A new study suggested that actually might not work, and could also significantly hurt blue-collar workers. We'll talk about that in just a few minutes.

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Election 2012
11:54 am
Wed June 6, 2012

What Do Tuesday's Results Mean For November?

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 1:54 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, a lot of famous people have gotten in trouble for being reckless with the social media tool Twitter, but now the skilful use of the delete key may not be enough to save them if they are running for office or are already a member of Congress. We'll find out why in just a few minutes.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:52 am
Wed June 6, 2012

Independent Grades For Hospitals Show Quality Could Be Better

Hospitals that muff patient safety avoided F's for now, but a new independent grading system will hand those out before long.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 4:23 pm

The cities of New York and Los Angeles grade their restaurants on cleanliness and the precautions they take to avoid making customers sick.

Now hospitals are getting similar assessments for their patient safety records from the Leapfrog Group, a nonprofit that's looking to improve the quality and safety of health care.

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Music Reviews
11:43 am
Wed June 6, 2012

Making Music From Messy Relationships With 'Kin'

The new album Kin is a collaboration between author Mary Karr and singer-songwriter Rodney Crowell.
Deborah Feingold

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 11:08 am

It's not unusual for poets to try their hands at pop music-making. Patti Smith was a poet before she was a rock star. In recent years, print-poets such as David Berman and Wyn Cooper have put out more-than-credible song collections. But Mary Karr, known more for prize-winning memoirs such as The Liars Club and Lit than for her excellent poetry, has taken a high-profile risk that's paid off.

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Book Reviews
11:36 am
Wed June 6, 2012

Brit Wit Meets Manor Mystery In 'Uninvited Guests'

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 11:08 am

A dark and stormy night; an isolated manor house; a knock at the door. These are the surefire elements that have kept Agatha Christie's play The Mousetrap creaking continuously on the London stage ever since its premiere in 1952. And these are the very same elements that make Sadie Jones' new novel, The Uninvited Guests, such a delicious romp to read.

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The Fresh Air Interview
10:59 am
Wed June 6, 2012

Neil Young: The Fresh Air Interview

Neil Young.
Danny Clinch

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 11:08 am

Neil Young and Crazy Horse's latest project — their first together in nine years — is an album featuring American folk songs and the tunes many of us learned as children, performed with grit, wit and a whole lot of electric guitar.

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The Two-Way
10:57 am
Wed June 6, 2012

Ray Bradbury, Author Of 'Fahrenheit 451' And Other Classics, Dies

Science fiction writer Ray Bradbury in 2000.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 11:45 am

  • Bradbury on writing 'Fahrenheit 451'

Author Ray Bradbury has died, his daughter tells The Associated Press. The wire service says Bradbury passed away Tuesday night.

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The Two-Way
10:21 am
Wed June 6, 2012

Nearly 6.5 Million LinkedIn Passwords Reportedly Stolen

LinkedIn

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 3:55 pm

"Our team is currently looking into reports of stolen passwords," the business networking website LinkedIn confirms, after word of a Russian hacker's claim to have stolen nearly 6.5 million users' passwords.

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