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Rebuilding Japan
4:32 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Crippled Japanese Reactors Face Decades Of Work

Last year's earthquake and tsunami crippled the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station. Foreign journalists saw cleanup and recovery work in process on Feb. 28.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:58 am

The earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on March 11, 2011, lasted for many terrifying minutes. But the multiple nuclear meltdowns that followed created an emergency that lasted for weeks and a legacy that will last for decades.

Here's how the event unfolded. The tsunami knocked out power to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. As a result, the cooling systems failed and three reactors melted down. Steam laced with radioactive material poured into the air. Water contaminated with radiation also flowed into the sea.

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The Two-Way
4:28 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Mormon Church Limits Access to Controversial Baptism Records

Sunrise hits the Mormon church's temple in Salt Lake City.
Douglas C. Pizac AP

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 6:12 pm

Persistent pressure and criticism have prompted the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to erect a new "technological barrier" in the system used for controversial posthumous or proxy baptisms.

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The Two-Way
4:12 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Harry Wendelstedt, Longtime Baseball Umpire, Has Died

This 1998 file photo shows veteran National League umpire Harry Wendelstedt, left, with his son, Hunter Wendelstedt, also an umpire.
Mary Butkus AP

Harry Wendelstedt spent 33 years as a National League umpire, including five stints to the World Series.

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Around the Nation
4:12 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Haven Or Hell: Refugees In Idaho Struggle For Work

Nowela Virginie and her daughters often visit social worker Marcia Munden at Catholic Charities of Idaho.
Molly Messick StateImpact

Originally published on Sat March 10, 2012 1:49 pm

In the last few years, more than 4,000 refugees have found their way to a far-flung spot: Idaho. Most of the state's incoming refugees come to Boise. For years, the city's strong economy, good-quality affordable housing and supportive community created an especially favorable environment for refugee resettlement. The recession has shifted that picture.

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Africa
4:00 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

How Teenagers Learned To Hate Joseph Kony

Joseph Kony in southern Sudan in 2006. His exact whereabouts today are unknown.
STR AP

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 4:25 pm

If you're a teenager, you probably hadn't heard of Joseph Kony last week. This week, you probably couldn't avoid him.

"If I log onto Facebook or Twitter any time during the day, it's my entire news feed, basically," says Patrick Franks, an 18-year-old senior at Loyola Blakefield High School, outside Baltimore.

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Europe
3:46 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

A Health Care Tragedy Plays Out In A Greek Port

Near the port of Piraeus and about 10 miles west of Athens, Perama developed after the Greek civil war of the 1940s, growing prosperous in the 1980s thanks to the ship-repair industry.

But now, the once-bustling piers are deserted. A few rusting skeletons of unfinished boats stand outside empty, abandoned warehouses.

That's because business migrated to low-cost Turkey and China, and in a few short years, industry jobs dropped from 4,500 to 50.

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Rebuilding Japan
3:41 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

For Kids In Japan, Adjusting To A Changed World

Students at Tohoku Chosen, an elementary and junior high school for North Koreans in Sendai City, now take dance classes in the school's cafeteria because their main building was destroyed when the earthquake struck northeast Japan last March.
Doualy Xaykaothao NPR

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 10:22 pm

Teacher Dave Rowlands is talking to his students in a kindergarten class at Imagine Japan, an English-language school in the Miyagi Prefecture of Sendai City. The school is just a short walk from pre-fabricated homes built for families who lost more than just property in the earthquake and tsunami last year.

"What came after the earthquake, was what?" Rowlands asks. "A tidal wave. In Japanese, what do we say? Or in English, actually, tsunami is now used around the world in many languages. Tsunami. We kind of leave the 't' off of there."

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The Picture Show
3:19 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

In Battle For Rhino Horns, A Clash Of Cultures

A white rhino cow (left) grazes with a bull that has become her companion after a poaching attack in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa.
Brent Stirton National Geographic

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:58 am

Rhino poaching has been on the rise in the past few years. In South Africa and other regions where rhinos run, poachers have been killing or darting rhinos with tranquilizers for their horns.

Rather than adorning walls, many horns are ground up into medicines, sold mostly in Southeast Asia. A possible — yet controversial — way to stop poaching may be rhino ranches, where the horns are harvested for sale and the animals are allowed to grow new ones.

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The Two-Way
3:18 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Syrian Opposition Leader Rejects Annan's Call For Dialogue

Syrian National Council leader Burhan Ghalioun attends a news conference in Paris on March 1.
Thibault Camus AP

The leader of Syria's main opposition group has some harsh words for Kofi Annan, who was appointed by the U.N. to be its envoy to Syria.

In an interview with the Associated Press Burhan Ghalioun said Annan's comments so far have been "disappointing."

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It's All Politics
3:12 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Despite Mixed Polls, Gingrich Claims Lead In Southern States

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich speaks at a rally with his wife, Callista, on Thursday in Jackson, Miss.
Marianne Todd Getty Images

Mitt Romney may consider the pair of primaries in Alabama and Mississippi on Tuesday an "away game," but Newt Gingrich is claiming a home court advantage.

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Energy
3:00 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Ohio Toughens Regulations On Gas Drillers

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 6:00 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You are listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Earthquakes in eastern Ohio have prompted stiff new regulations for some energy companies. The companies dispose of waste water from fracking by injecting it into deep underground wells. And some low-magnitude quakes in the Youngstown area have been linked to that disposal process. So Ohio's Department of Natural Resources introduced the new rules today.

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Science
3:00 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Film Director To Travel To Bottom Of Mariana Trench

Robert Siegel talks to retired Navy Captain Don Walsh about the attempt by movie director James Cameron to take a submersible capsule to the bottom of the Mariana Trench — the deepest spot on Earth. Walsh says it will be a combination of science and adventure, because Cameron is a storyteller and dedicated amateur explorer. Walsh made a 1960 dive to the same trench.

Afghanistan
2:37 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

U.S., Afghan Forces Try To Rebuild Trust

A U.S. soldier instructs Afghan soldiers in the western city of Herat last July. Afghans in security force uniforms have killed a number of U.S. and NATO troops recently. The shootings come as NATO works to prepare the Afghan forces to take control of security.
Jalil Rezayee EPA /Landov

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 6:00 pm

In Afghanistan, the killings are called "green on blue" — that's when an Afghan soldier or police officer turns his gun on a NATO ally.

There was a wave of such violence just last month after U.S. soldiers accidentally burned Korans. Over the next week, six Americans were killed, apparently at the hands of Afghans working with the U.S.

The top U.S. and NATO commanders in Afghanistan think they have some answers to this recurring problem, and it's up to U.S. soldiers like Capt. Joe Fritze to see if they work.

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The Two-Way
2:25 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

With 'Mouth To Snout' CPR, 'Mushing Mortician' Saves Iditarod Dog

Marshall, after his brush with death.
SB Nation

This story broke Wednesday in the Anchorage Daily News, but it has too much going for it not to pass along.

Monday night while competing in Alaska's Iditarod dog sled race, Scott Janssen's 9-year-old husky Marshall collapsed.

"Janssen raced to the dog," the newspaper writes. "Marshall did not appear to be breathing."

"I know what death looks like, and he was gone. Nobody home," Janssen told the Daily News.

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The Two-Way
2:22 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

How Divided Is Congress? Two Charts Explain It

A chart from the National Journal.
National Journal

This is from a few days ago, but we missed it until The Atlantic pointed it out today.

We know Congress is divided. But how much so?

Here's a graph The Atlantic dug up from data The National Journal has put together using data they've collected for about 30 years analyzing congressional votes:

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Planet Money
1:11 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

This 14-Year-Old Girl Just Bought A House In Florida

Willow Tufano, landlord.
Chana Joffe-Walt NPR

Originally published on Mon March 12, 2012 10:46 am

Meet Willow Tufano, age 14: Lady Gaga fan, animal lover, landlord.

In 2005, when Willow was 7, the housing market was booming. Home prices in some Florida neighborhoods nearly doubled from one month to the next. Her family moved into a big house; her mom became a real estate agent.

But as Willow moved from childhood to adolescence, the market turned, and the neighborhood emptied out. "Everyone is getting foreclosed on here," she says.

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Education
12:00 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Questions Grow Over Race Discipline Report

The Department of Education's top civil rights official, Russlynn Ali, speaks with host Michel Martin about a new report. It finds students of color have less access to high-level classes, their teachers are often paid less than those of white students in same district, and suspension rates for black students are disproportionately high.

The Two-Way
12:00 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Photo: Northern Lights Over Iceland

The Northern Lights in the sky Thursday above Faskusfjordur on the east coast of Iceland Thursday.
Jonina Oskardottir AP

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 1:28 pm

The solar storm that swept over Earth Thursday didn't seem to cause any major problems, as some had feared.

But the prediction that it would create some beautiful Northern Lights has proved to be quite true. The Associated Press has moved a quite striking photo taken Thursday on the east coast of Iceland.

If you see others, and good videos as well, share any links in the comments thread.

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It's All Politics
12:00 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

The Fight Over Voter ID Laws Goes To The United Nations

NAACP president Ben Jealous hopes that international pressure might be another weapon against strict new voter ID laws. Here Jealous speaks on Jan. 16 at the South Carolina State House in Columbia, S.C. for Martin Luther King Day.
Rainier Ehrhardt Reuters /Landov

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People announced it will appear before the United Nations' Human Rights Council in Geneva next week to seek support for its fight against voter identification laws enacted in U.S. states.

The civil rights organization says the laws are among several measures adopted by some states that violate the human and civil rights of minority voters by suppressing their participation in elections.

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The Two-Way
11:00 am
Fri March 9, 2012

VIDEO: Check Out This 7-Year-Old's Monster Trap

Audri, up close.
YouTube.com

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