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The Two-Way
11:55 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Syrian Officials To Blame For Crimes Against Humanity, U.N. Panel Suggests

Syrians today carried the body of a youth reportedly killed in violence in the Idlib region.
Bulent Kilic AFP/Getty Images

A United Nations panel says it has evidence that top Syrian officials "bear responsibility for crimes against humanity and other gross human rights violations" during the nearly year-long crackdown on dissent that has left thousands of civilians dead.

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All Tech Considered
11:01 am
Thu February 23, 2012

CU In Court: Texts Can Be A Divorce Lawyer's Dream

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri February 24, 2012 6:36 pm

Americans have learned to carefully craft their Facebook postings, and edit and spell-check e-mails. But apparently we don't give text messages much thought, and they're providing abundant and effective fodder for divorce attorneys.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:00 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Flu Bug: Missing In Action

Ramon Maldonado-Cardenas grimaces as he gets a flu shot from pharmacy student Khoa Truong during a health fair in Sacramento, Calif., last October.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

It's been a weird winter. It's warm when it should be cold. There's mud where there should be snow. Flowers are blooming way ahead of schedule. Wildlife seems confused.

Well, here's one more weirdness: The flu season seems to be largely M.I.A.

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Politics
11:00 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Understanding The Impact Of Citizens United

James Bopp is the lawyer who first represented Citizens United in the case that ended up in the Supreme Court, which ruled that corporations and unions could give money to political committees active in election campaigns. That decision and subsequent lower court decisions have led to SuperPACs, which allow corporations, unions and individuals to make unlimited contributions, pool them together, and use the money for political campaigns.

Politics
11:00 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Examining The SuperPAC With Colbert's Trevor Potter

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 1:19 pm

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm Terry Gross. SuperPACs have led to what was described in the New York Times yesterday as a new breed of super-donor. About two dozen individuals, couples or corporations have given a million dollars or more this year to Republican superPACs that have poured that money directly into this year's presidential campaign.

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The Two-Way
10:05 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Google Glasses: Frightening Or Fantastic?

The view will be more sophisticated than this, but you get the idea.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 11:34 am

The buzz is building about the news that, as The New York Times has reported, there soon may be "Google glasses" that can "stream information to the wearer's eyeballs in real time."

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The Two-Way
9:15 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Reports: Marine Helicopters Crash In Southwest

(This post was updated with breaking news at 9:27 a.m. ET.)

Seven U.S. Marines were killed Wednesday night when two helicopters collided over the Yuma, Ariz., Training Range Complex, according to a statement just emailed to the NPR Newscast Desk by a spokesman for the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing.

The statement adds that:

"The aircraft, an AH-1W 'Cobra' and an UH-1Y 'Huey,' were conducting routine training operations around 8:00 p.m. Identities of the Marines will be withheld until next of kin have been notified."

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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Jobless Claims Stay At Four-Year Low

There were 351,000 first-time claims for unemployment insurance last week, unchanged from the four-year-low level of the week before, the Employment and Training Administration just reported.

It adds that "the 4-week moving average was 359,000, a decrease of 7,000 from the previous week's revised average of 366,000."

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Online Privacy Act's No. 1 Principle Is 'Individual Control'

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 9:09 am

  • Steve Henn, reporting on 'Morning Edition'

Saying that "we must reject the conclusion that privacy is an outmoded value" and that it has been "at the heart of our democracy from its inception," President Obama this morning released his administration's "Framework for Protecting Privacy and Promoting Innovation in the Global Digital Economy" — a "Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights."

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The Two-Way
7:30 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Report: Two U.S. Troops Killed In Afghanistan; Quran Burnings Backlash?

Demonstrators shouted anti-American slogans during a protest in Kabul today (Feb. 23, 2012).
Shah Marai AFP/Getty Images

"Two U.S. troops have been shot to death and four more wounded by an Afghan solider who turned his gun on his allies in apparent anger over the burning of Qurans at a U.S. military base in Afghanistan, an Afghan official tells CBS News."

Officially, the International Security Assistance Force says that:

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Around the Nation
7:28 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Ohio Church Makes Lenten Ashes Easy To Receive

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 7:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Europe
7:11 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Italian Cabinet Posts Finances, Website Crashes

Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti wants more transparency so he made his cabinet disclose their finances. That sparked so much interest, the government website crashed. Ministers own real estate in New York, Brussels and Paris. One made $9 million last year.

The Two-Way
7:05 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Dozens Killed, Hundreds Wounded In Iraq; Attacks Blamed On Al-Qaida

An Iraqi policeman inspects a destroyed vehicle at the site of a blast in the northern city of Kirkuk earlier today (Feb. 23, 2012).
Marwan Ibrahim AFP/Getty Images

"A rapid series of attacks spread over a wide swath of Iraqi territory killed at least 50 people on Thursday, targeting mostly security forces in what appeared to be another strike by al-Qaida militants bent on destabilizing the country," The Associated Press reports.

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It's All Politics
6:53 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Desert Face-Off May Have Closed Out Debate Season. So What Did We Learn?

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney waves to the crowd as he is introduced at the start of Wednesday night's Republican presidential debate in Mesa, Ariz.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Ten months and a score of debates ago, the Republican Party and a slew of news organizations brought forth on our TV screens a new definition of a presidential nominating process — conceived in targeted marketing and dedicated to the proposition that no number of debates was too many for hardcore conservatives.

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Politics
6:00 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Budget Watchdog To Candidates: Back Up Tough Talk

Republican presidential hopefuls have had a field day attacking President Obama for the federal government's trillion-dollar deficits and promising things will be different when the GOP is in charge.

But while the candidates talk a good game about stemming the tide of red ink, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget says their proposals don't necessarily add up.

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NPR Story
4:00 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Syrian City Homs Besieged By Government Troops

Syrian government troops are continuing to bombard the central city of Homs. The United Nations says more than five thousand people have been killed during the 11-month uprising. Syrian activists say the number is much higher. Yesterday, two foreign journalists were among those killed.

NPR Story
4:00 am
Thu February 23, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Renee Montagne has the Last Word in business.

NPR Story
4:00 am
Thu February 23, 2012

London Meeting To Focus On Somalia's Needs

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 6:31 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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Middle East
3:52 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Egypt's Press Still Feels The Power Of The Military

An Egyptian stock trader reads a copy of the Al-Masry Al-Youm newspaper last November. Critics say the newspaper is reluctant to criticize the ruling military council and has engaged in self-censorship.
Amr Nabil AP

When Egypt's former President Hosni Mubarak was ousted from power last February, many Egyptian journalists hoped for a new era of freedom of expression.

But many now say they've been disappointed. A year after the revolution, Egypt's independent media still face many challenges, mostly, but not exclusively, from the country's ruling military council.

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