LATEST FROM NPR

Pages

Politics
6:14 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Obama's Budget First Salvo In Expected Political Fight

Copies of of President Barack Obama's fiscal 2013 federal budget are readied for shipment, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012, at the Government Printing Office in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

When President Obama unveils his budget Monday, it will project a $1.3 trillion deficit this year, and just under $1 trillion in 2013. It would increase spending on education, research and development and transportation. It would also increase taxes on the wealthy and cut spending, including on defense.

Presidential budgets are almost always aspirational documents. They lay out a vision, not what the president actually thinks will happen.

Read more
Presidential Race
2:37 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Romney Edges A Victory In Maine Caucuses

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney greets supporters at a caucus in Portland, Maine, on Saturday.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Stung by a series of defeats earlier this week, Mitt Romney got a much-needed boost Saturday with a win in the straw poll of the Conservative Political Action Conference and a victory in Maine's nonbinding caucuses.

Yet Romney walked away without delegates and tallied fewer votes there than he did four years ago. This time, he barely beat rival Ron Paul.

Read more
Europe
9:28 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

Old Money Helps Spanish Village Stay Afloat

A poster reading "The peseta is back" stands in Salvaterra de Mino, northwestern Spain. Some areas in Spain are returning to their former currency to make extra cash during the debt crisis.
Miguel Riopa AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 12, 2012 2:09 pm

Villamayor de Santiago, population 2,500, is a small village just south of Madrid, Spain.

It's famous for three Manchego cheese factories and a windmill that stopped turning decades ago. More than one-third of the town is unemployed.

After Christmas, shopkeepers decided to jump-start their economy.

"We realized there's no money here — well, no euros anyway — in the pockets of our customers," says Luis Miguel Campayo, head of the local merchants' association.

Read more
The Record
9:15 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

Whitney Houston: Her Life Played Out Like An Opera

Whitney Houston performs in 1988.
David Corio Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:32 pm

Read more
Economy
5:22 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

N.C. Regulator Tapped To Handle $25B Mortgage Deal

There was one little-noticed part of this week's announcement about the $25 billion national mortgage settlement. North Carolina's banking commissioner, Joseph Smith Jr., will take over a new role and serve as independent monitor. He'll oversee the five banks which agreed to new mortgage loan servicing and foreclosure standards.

Read more
Anti-Government Protests Roil Egypt
4:44 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

A Year After Mubarak, Where Does Egypt Stand?

Protesters gather for a demonstration to demand the ouster of the country's military rulers at Cairo's Tahrir Square on Friday.
Mahmud Hams AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 5:23 pm

A year ago today, tens of thousands of Egyptians gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square and celebrated a previously unimaginable achievement: the toppling of Hosni Mubarak.

But one year later, Egypt is far from stable and far from the democratic utopia many activists imagined. Is the nation better off?

Read more
NPR Story
3:00 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

Week In News: A Week Of Deals For Obama

James Fallows of The Atlantic talks to weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz about President Barack Obama's compromise on providing reproductive services mandated by health care law after resistance from religious institutions and his latest cover story for The Atlantic on Obama's demeanor and a recent deal reached with five of the biggest banks in the country to pay back individuals whose homes were wrongly foreclosed on.

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

Oklahoma Opts Out Of Foreclosure Deal

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 5:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Well, every single state in the country will get a piece of that $26 billion to help troubled homeowners keep their homes, every single state except Oklahoma. The attorney general in Oklahoma decided to opt out of the multistate settlement to hold banks accountable for questionable lending and foreclosure practices.

Scott Pruitt is Oklahoma's attorney general, and he joins me now on the line. Attorney General, welcome.

SCOTT PRUITT: Well, thank you, Guy.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

Hard Times Familiar in Okfuskee County, Okla.

Okfuskee County in Oklahoma is the birthplace of Woody Guthrie, who would have turned 100 this year. Much of the economic problems Guthrie sang about were from what he saw in the county, which was once the largest all-black community in the country. Guthrie's music still resonates there, especially in the town of Boley, where hope is hard to come by. Logan Layden of State Impact Oklahoma reports.

Read more
Simon Says
8:54 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Ralph Nader's $2,680 Airplane Aisle Seat

When Americans traveled by stagecoach, they had to worry about rocks, rattlesnakes, robbers and other varmints. But I wonder if there weren't fewer passenger complaints.

Ralph Nader is not running for president this year. But he's giving a couple of speeches in Dallas this weekend and booked an American Airlines flight a couple of weeks ago for a $750 fare.

The flight takes three hours. Mr. Nader is 6 feet, 4 inches tall. His longtime travel agent tried to select an aisle seat, which is more comfortable for Mr. Nader. Probably for whoever might be next to him, too.

Read more
National Security
8:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Lawyers Share The Bench In Terrorism Cases

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 11:46 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more
Economy
8:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Warm Weather Easing Local Budgets

Temperatures have been above normal in Chicago this winter, saving the city's snow removal budget millions of dollars.
Jeffrey Phelps AP

In January of last year, snow blanketed more than 42 percent of the country. Last month, it was just under 13 percent. The warm weather has lowered our heating bills and created a bit of an economic boost.

After two brutally long winters, the temperatures this year have been positively balmy. In the Washington, D.C., area, they've hovered in the 50s for much of the past two and a half months. Area landscapers, whose schedules are usually pretty lean this time of year, are busier. Take Chuck Dod Landscaping, which is building a stone wall in the backyard of a home in Mclean, Va.

Read more
Europe
8:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Euro-Courts Blasted Over Al-Qaida Suspect's Release

Britons are in an uproar over a judge's decision to release a Muslim preacher suspected of al-Qaida links. The British government wanted to deport him to Jordan, where he's been convicted on terrorism charges, but European courts won't allow that because the convictions were based on evidence obtained by torture. NPR's Phil Reeves tells host Scott Simon that the case has stirred up resentment.

Sports
8:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Sports: Lin Shoots For Stardom; Patriot Fans Sour

Lin-sanity grips basketball! Gripes and second-guesses grip Pats fans! And what do we owe great four-legged athletes when they go past their prime? Host Scott Simon talks with NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman about the sports of the week.

Middle East
8:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

A Year After Mubarak Fell, What Has Egypt Achieved?

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 11:46 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Now let's move to Egypt where one year ago today mounting protests forced Hosni Mubarak to step down as president. Last February, millions of jubilant Egyptians poured out onto the streets across the country, but that mood has given way to widespread frustration. Many Egyptians object to the continued hold on power by Mubarak's military allies, a rapidly weakening economy and the failure to bring the former president to justice. This week we spoke with people around Cairo about their impressions one year on.

Read more
Middle East
8:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Rising Violence Claims A General In Syria's Capital

Syria's state-run news agency says a high-ranking military officer has been assassinated. NPR's Kelly McEvers reports the attack comes as violence in Syria is quickly escalating.

Middle East
8:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Medical Care Reportedly Under Attack In Syria

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 11:46 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more
Religion
8:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Boston's Neighborhood Parishes May Become Branch Offices

The Archdiocese of Boston is taking a business approach to its problem of too many parishes, too few priests and not enough parishioners. It plans to merge parishes into clusters and placing them under one pastor. It will eliminate dozens of parish jobs for lay people and take away local control of a church's budget and religious education program. The plan is being met with considerable pushback from priests and parishioners. Monica Brady-Myerov of member station WBUR reports.

Animals
8:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

The Zebra's Stripes, A Personal No-Fly Zone

Scientists in Hungary and Sweden say they've found an answer to the age-old question of how the zebra got its stripes. It turns out the pattern may have evolved to repel Africa's biting flies. The researchers discovered this by placing models of patterned zebras next to models of their plainer cousins, horses, and measuring how many flies ended up on each one. Host Scott Simon has more.

Around the Nation
8:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Just You, Your Dogs And The Yukon Sled Race

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 11:46 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Nearly two dozen dog sledding teams set out a week ago on a thousand mile race over some of the most remote territory in North America. The mushers have reached the halfway mark in the race. They're now in the Canadian Yukon. And Emily Schwing of member station KUAC has been following the race since its start in Fairbanks, Alaska.

Read more

Pages