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Health
5:07 am
Thu July 30, 2015

Close Listening: How Sound Reveals The Invisible

Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 3:53 pm

Over the years, scientists have mostly interpreted the world through what they can see. But in the past few decades, a culture of listening has blossomed, especially among biologists who seek to understand how animals communicate. This week Morning Edition embarks on a weekly summer series called Close Listening: Decoding Nature Through Sound. We begin with an innovation that transformed medicine by searching sounds for clues to illness and health.

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Music Interviews
5:07 am
Thu July 30, 2015

Through Doubt And Dark Times, Joss Stone Lets Her Voice Light The Way

Joss Stone's new album, Water For Your Soul, is out July 31.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 5:01 pm

Joss Stone's voice first stunned listeners more than a decade ago. The British singer was only 14 years old then, but her booming, soulful voice got noticed, as did her knack for taking success in stride. At age 28, she hasn't stopped: Stone's newest album, Water for Your Soul, comes out this Friday.

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Parallels
5:07 am
Thu July 30, 2015

In The West Bank, A Rough Start Doesn't Deter New Arab TV Channel

Afaf Shini, a host on the Palestine 48 TV channel, holds a reading card with the satellite channel's logo during a morning broadcast in Ramallah in July. Israel shut down operations just days after the launch.
Nasser Nasser AP

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 2:29 pm

One out of every five people in Israel is Arab. But Israeli TV sets aside only a few hours a week for Arabic-language programming. And Arabs in Israel don't have many opportunities to see their own cities and lives reflected on the screen. That's the idea behind a new TV channel. It's called Palestine 48, a reference to the year Israel was founded.

The channel's new morning show is called Our Morning Is Different. It's like an Arabic version of the Today show, with a breezy opening jingle and stock footage of sunlight peeking through a field.

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Around the Nation
5:07 am
Thu July 30, 2015

#TheEmptyChair Amplifies Conversation About Sexual Assault

This week's New York magazine cover has received a lot of attention.
New York Magazine Via Twitter

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 5:52 pm

The cover story of this week's New York magazine is getting a lot of attention.

It features 35 women seated in chairs and one empty chair. The women are all dressed in black, looking straight ahead with both hands resting on their knees. It is a stark image, and all the more compelling because each of them is openly and by name accusing Bill Cosby of horrendous acts. Some say they were drugged and raped; others recount stories of narrowly escaping sexual assault.

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Sports
6:40 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

After Boston Drops Olympic Bid, U.S. Committee Scrambles To Find New Choice

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Story
6:04 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Obama Administration Officials Take The 'Malign' Line On Iran

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Sports
6:04 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Mexico's Soccer Coach Fired After Punching TV Reporter

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Code Switch
6:04 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Once Outlaws, Young Lords Find A Museum Home For Radical Roots

Johanna Fernández, co-curator of a new exhibition about the Young Lords, points to pages of the group's newspaper on display at the Bronx Museum of the Arts.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

They were under watch by the FBI and the New York Police Department. And by the early 1970s, the Young Lords emerged as one of the country's most prominent radical groups led by Latino activists.

Inspired by the Black Panthers, a band of young Puerto Ricans wanted to form a Latino counterpart to the black nationalist group. In fact, one of the founding Young Lords in New York City almost started a group called the "Brown Tigers."

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Your Money
6:04 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

From The Silents To Millennials, Debt Burdens Span The Generations

Alyson Hurt and Paige Pfleger NPR

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 1:57 pm

For most of us, debt is a big part of life. According to a new study by Pew Charitable Trusts, 80 percent of Americans have some form of debt — from student loans to credit card balances.

There are many among the so-called silent generation, those born before World War II, who are still paying off mortgages and credit cards.

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The Salt
6:04 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Europe's Taste For Caviar Is Putting Pressure On A Great Lakes Fish

Lake herring roe at the Dockside Fish Market in Grand Marais, Minn. Some workers at the market call it "Lake Superior Gold."
Derek Montgomery for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

Lake Superior is the largest freshwater lake in the world, by surface area, and it has something the other Great Lakes do not: stable populations of mostly native fish species.

But scientists say a key fish in Superior's food web is now in trouble because of mild winters and an appetite for caviar in Europe.

There wasn't much demand for lake herring 10 years ago. It used to be fed to mink and used as fertilizer, according to Craig Hoopman, a commercial fisherman in Wisconsin who fishes around Lake Superior's Apostle Islands.

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The Two-Way
5:56 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Birkin Bag Is Fine, But Namesake Actress Wants 'Birkin Croco' Rebranded

The Birkin Croco is made of dyed crocodile skin.
Sam Yeh AFP/Getty Images

A lot of people who want a Birkin bag — a handbag popular among celebrities that can cost more than $100,000 — will get on multiple-year waiting lists to get one. But its namesake wants nothing to do with one version of it.

Specifically, Jane Birkin no longer wants to be affiliated with the popular crocodile-skin version. Her request comes after PETA published a graphic video on how crocodiles are allegedly treated before being killed.

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The Two-Way
5:50 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

SpaceShipTwo 'Pilot Was Thrown From The Vehicle' High In Atmosphere

A photo released by Virgin Galactic shows a badly injured SpaceShipTwo pilot Peter Siebold drifting under his parachute after last October's accident that destroyed the spacecraft during a test flight.
Mark Greenberg Virgin Galactic

The dramatic failure of a test flight by Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo rocket last October cost the co-pilot his life and left the pilot severely injured. New data from investigators suggest that the pilot survived in part because the craft essentially came apart around him.

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Goats and Soda
4:53 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

One Point Of View On How Lions Can Earn Money For Africa

Tourists on safari watch three young lions in Kenya's Masai Mara National Reserve.
Beverly Joubert National Geographic/Getty Images

A beloved lion in Zimbabwe — Cecil was his name — was wounded with a crossbow, then later shot dead. The animal had reportedly been lured from Hwange National Park, a protected area.

The dentist who killed the lion said he believes it was a legal hunt, for which he reportedly paid $50,000.

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Middle East
4:38 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Afghan Government Says Taliban Leader Mullah Omar Is Dead

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Law
4:38 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

University Of Cincinnati Police Officer Indicted In Killing Of Black Motorist

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 2:08 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Youth Radio
4:38 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Probation With A Therapeutic Approach Keeps Kids Out Of Juvenile Hall

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
4:38 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

The Golden Age Of Cocktails: When Americans Learned To Love Mixed Drinks

An illustration from The Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain, published in 1897. Between the 1860s and 1920, when Prohibition went into effect, American bartending came into its own.
Internet Archive Book Images Flickr

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 2:16 pm

Summertime is the perfect time to indulge in a refreshing cocktail on a balmy night. But before you reach for that minty mojito or sweet sangria, consider stepping out of your modern-day comfort zone and going back to the drinks of 100 years ago.

"Some of the best cocktails that we think about today — the martini, the daiquiri, the Manhattan — those all came out between the 1860s and Prohibition," says Derek Brown, an award-winning mixologist who has studied the history of alcohol in America.

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All Tech Considered
4:38 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Politics Overshadows U.S. Tech Firms' Hopes For Entering Iran

Customers try out cellphones and tablets in a store in Tehran, in 2012. Financial sanctions make it difficult for U.S. firms to do business in Iran, analysts say.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 2:44 pm

Iran has the potential to be a boom market for American tech companies. The majority of the population is under 30 and well educated, and over half the country has access to the Internet.

Many businesses have to wait until more sanctions are lifted, but certain tech companies can already go into Iran legally because the U.S. has lifted sanctions on various communication technology. They just aren't sure they want to.

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Environment
4:38 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

California's Drought Spurs Unexpected Effect: Eco-Friendly Development

A town in California's Central Valley plans to transform farmland into an eco-friendly residential community. An artist's rendering shows plans for Kings River Village in Reedley, Calif.
Courtesy of the City of Reedley

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

The drought in California has gone on so long, and is so severe, that it's beginning to change the way people are designing residential communities — in unexpected ways, and unexpected places.

Planning is under way, for instance, for one of the first eco-friendly communities in California's predominantly agricultural Central Valley.

The site is in the town of Reedley, 30 miles southeast of Fresno.

There were a number of factors that distinguished Reedley, says Curt Johansen, the San Francisco developer who's spearheading the project.

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Goats and Soda
4:19 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Nobel Prize Winner Thinks No One Should Ever Retire

Nobel Laureate Muhammad Yunus, who just turned 75, thinks of credit as a human right.
Ben de la Cruz NPR

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 12:53 pm

Muhammad Yunus just had a milestone birthday. On June 28, he turned 75. It's a big moment for a man who's had many big moments in his life — most notably the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize for founding Grameen Bank, which loans small sums, aka "microcredit," to the poor, mainly women, so they can start their own businesses.

Yunus stopped by NPR last week — he was in Washington, D.C., for a conference — wearing the long, open-necked "kurta" shirt of his native Bangladesh. "[A tie] looks funny on me," he joked.

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