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Asia
12:01 am
Wed November 23, 2011

Made In China Doesn't Mean Cheap In China

Workers at the Hong Kong Apple Store hand over Apple iPhone 4s to customers on Nov. 11. Some goods made in China cost more in China than they do abroad.
Aaron Tam/AFP/Getty

China has made a fortune producing cheap products that sell for low prices around the world.

Yet many high-end goods manufactured in China –- everything from iPads to Coach bags — actually cost more in China than they do in the United States.

To figure out why, I recently visited a luxury shopping mall in Beijing with Professor Nie Huihua, who teaches economics at the People's University.

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The Message Machine
12:01 am
Wed November 23, 2011

For Thanksgiving, Debunk Your Family's Chain Emails

Many families serve up a helping of political misinformation along with the sweet potatoes. Be prepared with PolitiFact's handy guide to chain emails and other viral messages.
Marjory Collins Library of Congress

At Thanksgiving dinner, there's probably a good chance you'll end up sitting beside your uncle.

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Around the Nation
12:01 am
Wed November 23, 2011

Kansas City Cashes In On A Big-Time Sports Bet

Kansas City's four-year-old Sprint Center has no permanent big-league tenant, but it makes a profit from events like this 2009 preseason NHL hockey game between the Los Angeles Kings and the New York Islanders.
Ed Zurga AP

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 8:02 am

Four years ago, on the cusp of what would become a national economic meltdown, Kansas City made a bet. And the Missouri river town bet big, plunking down $300 million for a brand-new sports arena with no full-time tenant.

Today, that bet is paying off. Pollstar magazine ranks Kansas City's Sprint Center as America's fifth-busiest arena and No. 13 among worldwide venues.

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Tina Brown's Must-Reads
12:01 am
Wed November 23, 2011

Tina Brown's Must-Reads: The Columnist's Voice

Tina Brown, editor of The Daily Beast and Newsweek, tells us what she's been reading in a feature that Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth. This month, Brown has been considering the voice of the columnist through readings that provide new perspectives on political issues, moral issues and national events.

'A Caveman Won't Beat A Salesman'

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Africa
12:01 am
Wed November 23, 2011

Opposition Builds In South Africa To Security Law

South Africa's Parliament has passed a highly controversial state information bill that gives a limited number of government officials the authority to classify information and imposes harsh penalties on those who possess or distribute state secrets. Critics say it will allow officials to cover up corruption and greatly restrict the flow of information.

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Books News & Features
12:01 am
Wed November 23, 2011

Small Book, Big Story: Bronte Manuscript Discovered

Charlotte Bronte's recently discovered manuscript contains more than 4,000 words painstakingly crammed on to 19 pages, each measuring approximately 35 by 61 millimeters.
Courtesy of Sotheby's

Imagine a windswept moor in the north of England. Add a big house, where a clergyman and his four children live — isolated, pale little children inventing fantasy worlds in the nursery of a rambling old house.

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Sweetness And Light
10:00 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

An Eternal Tee Time Option For Die-Hard Golfers

For the most avid golf fans, there's now a golf course where they can be laid to rest for all eternity.
iStockphoto.com

The most involved sports fans cannot let a little thing like death get in their way for their devotion to a team.

For several years now it's been possible to buy caskets that feature the logo of your favorite, so that you can lie forever with, say, the emblem of the Chicago Cubs resting right before your sightless eyes. Not perfect, but the best available option.

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Law
8:09 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Government Whistle-Blowers Gain New Advocate

Carolyn Lerner is the new head of the U.S. Office of Special Counsel.
Peter Krogh Courtesy of U.S. Office of Special Counsel

The U.S. Office of Special Counsel is one of those small corners of the government with an important mission: It's supposed to help protect federal whistle-blowers and shield civil service workers from politics.

But during the Bush years, the office was engulfed in scandal. It was raided by FBI agents, and its chief was indicted for obstructing justice.

It's into that unsettled environment that the new leader, Carolyn Lerner, arrived five months ago. And good government groups say she's already taking the office in new directions.

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The Two-Way
6:43 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

FCC Joins Justice Department In Opposing AT&T, T-Mobile Merger

This June 2, 2010, file photo shows the AT&T logo in Washington, D.C.
Etienne Franchi AFP/Getty Images

The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission wants AT&T to prove that its merger with T-Mobile would be "in the public interest." Julius Genachowski sent the request for a hearing to the other three commissioners.

The move throws another roadblock in the proposed $39 billion merger. As we reported back in August, the Justice Department is already suing AT&T over the merger.

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Around the Nation
6:30 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Calling Home For The Holidays, Via Video From Iraq

Lindsey, Natalie and Paul Santana (seen via webcam), the day after Natalie's birth. "The hospital staff was so incredible to arrange for the Internet connection to make that possible," Lindsey says. She calls their Skype chat that day "such a great memory for us."
Lindsey Santana

For Lindsey Santana and her young family, video Web chats via Skype are an integral part of their lives. Her husband, Capt. Paul Santana, is a helicopter pilot serving in Iraq. And their video phone calls have helped them make the best of things during his deployment, which continues past this Thanksgiving.

The couple was also linked via video during the birth of their first child, Natalie, in West Virginia this past summer. And since then, Paul has been able to see his daughter "at least a few times a week," Lindsey tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer.

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The Two-Way
5:53 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

McCain Says Report Backs Comments About Immigrants Causing Wildfires

Sen. John McCain says a new report from the Government Accountability Office backs some of the controversial comments the Republican from Arizona made over the summer.

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The Salt
5:07 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Oyster Ice Cream: A Thanksgiving Tradition Mark Twain Could Get Behind

Serve this for T-Day, and you'll be in sync with history.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 11:00 am

Chef José Andrés grew up in Spain, but he has embraced Thanksgiving as a window into American history. That's why the guests at his Thanksgiving dinner might be starting off with oyster ice cream.

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The Salt
5:05 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Eating Canned Soup Makes BPA Levels Soar

The soup aisle at a grocery store in Washington, D.C.
Maggie Starbard NPR

If you read the ingredient list on a can of soup, you're likely to see items like carrots, wild rice, perhaps some noodles. What you won't see listed: BPA.

But a little canned soup for lunch can dramatically increase exposure to the chemical, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study confirms that canned food is a source of BPA exposure. But it does nothing to clear up the question of whether this sort of exposure to BPA has health consequences.

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The Two-Way
5:04 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Second Set Of 'Climategate' Emails Hit The Web

In a repeat of 2009, a second set of stolen emails from climate scientists at major universities has been released to the public.

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The Salt
4:54 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

When Thanksgiving Means Making Reservations, Not Turkey

Restaurants appeal to "activity-rich time-poor" Americans on Thanksgiving, the National Restaurant Association says.
STEPHAN ZABEL iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 5:52 pm

The moment of last-minute head counts and late-night runs to the supermarket has nearly arrived. But a small but proud segment of the population simply smiles and puts their feet up. They're having Thanksgiving dinner served to them in a restaurant.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:25 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Remember Vioxx? Merck Settles Marketing Charges From Way Back

Vioxx may be gone, but it wasn't forgotten by the Justice Department.
Daniel Hulshizer AP

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 11:44 am

Drugmaker Merck took the painkiller Vioxx off the market in 2004, citing an increased risk of heart attacks among people taking the medicine.

Today, seven years later, the Justice Department said Merck had agreed to pay $950 million to settle charges the company went too far in marketing the drug.

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Planet Money
4:17 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

The National Debt: What The Left And Right Agree On

Supercommittee members, Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona and Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 11:15 am

The congressional supercommittee announced Monday that it failed to come to an agreement on reducing the deficit. After three months of negotiating, the Democrats and Republicans just couldn't agree on how much spending to cut or how high to raise taxes.

But this is not a story about how the left and right disagree with each other. In fact, they actually largely agree.

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World Cafe
4:10 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

SuperHeavy On World Cafe

Superheavy: (left to right) Dave Stewart, Damian Marley, Joss Stone, Mick Jagger and A.R. Rahman.
Courtesy of the artists

SuperHeavy's credentials don't read much like those of most new bands. Its members boast 11 Grammy Awards between them, legendary parents, record sales in the millions and multiple Academy Awards for film scoring. And, on top of that, the band's existence was kept a secret until May 2011.

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World Cafe
4:01 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

World Cafe: Keith Richards On 'Some Girls'

Mick Jagger (left) and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones in 1978, the year Some Girls was originally released.
Lynn Goldsmith

An atmosphere of tension surrounded The Rolling Stones when the band got into the studio to record Some Girls, its 16th U.S. release, in 1978. Not only did the group worry that the new waves of disco and punk threatened to pass it by, but Keith Richards was awaiting a serious heroin-trafficking court date that threatened to put him and the group out of commission. The Stones were in trouble.

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The Two-Way
3:44 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

'Darkhorse' Marine Remembered By His Uncle John

Lance Cpl. Jake Romo does physical therapy at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego, Calif. He lost both legs in an explosion in Sangin, Afghanistan, in February 2011, while serving with the 3/5 Marines.
David Gilkey NPR

When Talk of the Nation's Neal Conan asks for callers on a given topic, there's no telling what he'll get. Today, the show followed up with NPR's Tom Bowman on his series about the tremendous sacrifices of the "Darkhorse" Battalion — the Marines of the 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment. Lance Cpl. Jake Romo lost both his legs in Afghanistan with the battalion, and he spoke with Conan and Bowman about his tour.

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