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The Two-Way
3:13 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Supreme Court Rules For Adoptive Family In Dispute

This October 2011 photo provided by Melanie Capobianco shows her adoptive daughter, Veronica, trick-or-treating in Charleston, S.C. The Supreme Court handed down a decision Tuesday in favor of the Capobiancos, who sued after Veronica was returned to her biological father under the Indian Child Welfare Act.
Courtesy of Melanie Capobianco AP

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 4:02 pm

In a complex and heart-wrenching case, a divided Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that the parental rights of a Native American father may be terminated if he has failed to establish a history of "continued custody" of his biological child.

The decision in Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl, however, is viewed as narrow and leaves intact the the 1978 federal law known as the Indian Child Welfare Act. The law was designed to stop the historically brutal and improper removal of Native American children from their families for adoption or foster care by white parents.

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The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

'Victory' For Landowners At The Supreme Court

Gary Cameron Reuters /Landov

While the Supreme Court decision knocking down a key provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act is getting a lot of attention Tuesday, there's another ruling that's going to be of high interest to property owners across the nation.

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The Salt
3:06 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

How Well Do You Know Your Fish Fillet? Even Chefs Can Be Fooled

Jessica McConnell, 26, of Silver Spring, Md., tries to identify halibut, red snapper and salmon at a dinner hosted by Oceana and the National Aquarium in Washington, D.C.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 12:42 pm

In the world of seafood, looks can be very deceiving. And unfortunately for anyone who buys fish, it's easy for people above you in the supply chain to sell you something other than what you want.

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Television
2:35 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

'Inside Amy Schumer': It's Not Just Sex Stuff

Amy Schumer isn't afraid to talk sexting, dirty talk or even the fine line between rape and deeply troubling sex in her comedy.
Peter Yang Comedy Central

One of Amy Schumer's comedy routines begins with the declaration, "I'm a little sluttier than the average bear. I really am."

Degrees of sluttiness may be hard to define, but Schumer does talk frankly about many subjects — including sex — that can be uncomfortable for people, both in her stand-up act and on her Comedy Central series, Inside Amy Schumer, which was recently renewed for a second season.

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Movie Reviews
2:19 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

'The Bling Ring': Celebrity Culture And Its Little Monsters

In Sofia Coppola's film The Bling Ring, about the excesses of Los Angeles materialism, Emma Watson plays narcissistic party girl Nicki.
Merrick Morton A24

We live in a world filled with crimes, but most of them don't have much to tell us. They're cases of mere stupidity, cruelty or greed. But every now and then one comes along that invites larger thoughts about the culture.

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Code Switch
2:15 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

As Demographics Shift, Kids' Books Stay Stubbornly White

At a San Jose, Calif. library, a young reader browses a shelf of books featuring a variety of main characters: ducks, hens, white kids, black kids. Libraries help drive demand for children's books with nonwhite characters, but book publishers say there aren't enough libraries to make those books best-sellers.
San Jose Library Flickr

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:14 am

When it comes to diversity, children's books are sorely lacking; instead of presenting a representative range of faces, they're overwhelmingly white. How bad is the disconnect?

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
2:10 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

How To Love The Zombie Apocalypse

World War Z is just the latest pop-culture incarnation of the Zombie Apocalypse. Adam Frank says the zombies keep coming because they're trying to tell us something.
MPC/Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 7:00 pm

"Zombie Apocalypse? What the hell are you talking about?"

It was our weekly astronomy group lunch when everyone, from the professors down to the undergrads, gets together for pizza. I'm not quite sure how the conversation took this turn, but at some point I quipped: "But of course that's after the Zombie Apocalypse."

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
1:48 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Is Cutting The Pentagon's Budget A Gift To Our Enemies?

Charles Dharapak AP
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Amid the across-the-board budget cuts known as sequestration and a general belt-tightening mood among many on Capitol Hill, the Pentagon is being asked to reduce its spending after a decade of increases.

Some argue that even with cutbacks, the U.S. spends far more than other countries on defense, and that the drones and special operations forces increasingly being used in the counterterrorism fight cost less than conventional military operations.

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The Two-Way
1:41 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Cardboard Bike's Fundraiser Is Rolling

The cardboard bicycle.
Baz Ratner Reuters /Landov

A quick update for the many who seemed fascinated by Israeli inventor Izhar Gafni's cardboard bicycle and his bid to bring it to the world:

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The Two-Way
1:36 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Putin: NSA Leaker Is A 'Free Person' At Moscow Airport

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at the presidential summer residence Kultaranta in Naantali, Finland on Tuesday.
Kimmo Mantyla AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 5:53 pm

Russian President Vladimir Putin appeared to rebuff the United States when he said NSA leaker Edward Snowden was in Moscow but is a "free person" who is "entitled to buy a ticket and fly to wherever he wants."

Snowden, Putin said, is in the transit zone of Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport and has neither crossed the Russian border nor "committed any crime" on Russian soil.

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Shots - Health News
1:20 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Big Weight Loss For Diabetics, But No Drop In Heart Risk

Weight loss has been a key component of diabetes treatment for centuries.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 4:23 pm

Hundreds of overweight or obese people with diabetes have been able to do something very few Americans have done: lose a big chunk of weight and keep it off for 10 years.

So should it matter if that epic weight loss didn't reduce the risk of heart disease? Maybe not.

That's one response to the results of the Look AHEAD clinical trial, which checked to see if losing weight reduced heart disease risk in people with Type 2 diabetes.

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The Two-Way
1:04 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Germany Says It's Uncovered Terrorist Plot Using Model Planes

German officials say they've uncovered a radical Islamist plot to use remote-controlled model airplanes packed with explosives to carry out terrorist attacks in Germany.

Police carried out nine predawn raids in southern and eastern Germany as well as Belgium in search of evidence of what prosecutors allege was a plan for a "serious, state-threatening act of violence." There were no arrests.

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Parallels
11:59 am
Tue June 25, 2013

In Qatar, A (Rare) Royal Abdication

The emir of Qatar, Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, 61, abdicated on Tuesday in favor of his 33-year-old son. Sheik Hamad is shown here during an Oval Office meeting with President Obama in April.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 4:02 pm

Qatar's emir, Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, handed over power to his 33-year-old son on Tuesday, and we found this rather remarkable on several counts.

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Law
11:57 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Voting Rights Act: Supreme Court Says Times Have Changed

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, we will hear a perspective on the immigration bill, which is being debated in the Senate right now. You might not have heard this point of view. We'll hear from Senator Mazie Hirono from Hawaii. She tells us why she thinks the bill in its current form disadvantages women. And she'll tell us what she proposes to do about that. That's coming up later in the program.

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The Two-Way
11:51 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Supreme Court Strikes Down Key Provision Of Voting Rights Law

Field Director Charles White of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) speaks at a podium outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday in Washington, D.C.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 4:49 pm

By a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court has struck down a key provision of the landmark 1965 Voting Rights Act that establishes a formula to identify states that may require extra scrutiny by the Justice Department regarding voting procedures.

The decision focuses on Section 4 of the Act.

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The Two-Way
11:40 am
Tue June 25, 2013

North, South Korean Sites Hacked On Korean War Anniversary

Websites in both North and South Korea were hacked Tuesday, the 63rd anniversary of the Korean War. A number of South Korean government and media websites reportedly were brought down, including that of President Park Geun Hye and the South Korean Office of Government Policy Coordination.

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The Salt
11:26 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Will GMOs Help Protect Ugandan Families Against Hunger?

A woman sells bananas at the Kampala Airport. Ugandans eat about a pound of the fruit, on average, per day.
Ronald Kabuubi AP

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 1:45 pm

While a few states in the U.S. are debating mandatory labels for genetically modified foods, some African nations are considering a bigger question: Should farmers be allowed to plant genetically modified crops at all?

The question carries extra weight in countries like Uganda, where most people are farmers who depend on their own crops for food.

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Law
11:10 am
Tue June 25, 2013

What Does The Court's Ruling On The Voting Rights Act Mean?

Renee Montagne speaks with NPR's Nina Totenberg about the implications of the Supreme Court's ruling, striking down a key provision of the law.

Law
11:10 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Supreme Court Strikes Down Key Section Of Voting Rights Act

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:09 am
Tue June 25, 2013

5-Year High In Consumer Confidence Bodes Well For Economy

If consumers are feeling better, they may be more apt to spend — which could mean better job growth down the road.
Jessica Rinaldi Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 1:30 pm

The economy "is unlikely to slow in the short-term, and may even moderately pick up," economist Lynn Franco predicted Tuesday as the Conference Board released its latest survey on consumer confidence.

The business research group, where Franco is director of economic indicators, said its index rose to a five-year high of 81.4 in June — up from May's 74.3. The index is based on surveys of Americans.

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