WCBE

Colin Dwyer

Major cities across Ivory Coast awoke to the clatter of gunfire Monday. In the country's commercial center and in several cocoa-producing hubs, disgruntled soldiers broke out weapons and blocked thoroughfares to protest stalled bonus payments and what they view as broken promises from President Alassane Ouattara.

It marks the fourth day of renewed tensions in a dispute that had appeared to be tentatively resolved months ago between the government and more than a third of its soldiers. Now, the country teeters anew on the brink of widespread violence.

At least one person has died of the Ebola virus in Democratic Republic of the Congo in recent weeks, according to the World Health Organization. WHO says tests reflected the disease's presence in the body of the victim — one of nine people in the remote northern corner of the country to contract hemorrhagic fever since April 22.

Three of them have died, though at this point, only one case has been confirmed by the country's National Institute of Biomedical Research as the Zaire strain of Ebola.

A muggle mystery is afoot in the U.K.

Sometime over a span of a week and a half in mid-April, a burglar (or several) broke into a property in a Birmingham suburb, stealing jewelry and one item that's even more valuable — certainly to Harry Potter fans, at least: an 800-word, handwritten prequel to the series, scrawled on a postcard by J.K. Rowling herself.

Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET

In a memo to staff, Attorney General Jeff Sessions ordered federal prosecutors to "charge and pursue the most serious, readily provable offense" — a move that marks a significant reversal of Obama-era policies on low-level drug crimes.

The two-page memo, which was publicly released Friday, lays out a policy of strict enforcement that rolls back the comparatively lenient stance established by Eric Holder, one of Sessions' predecessors under President Barack Obama.

Just days after her comments to Chinese investors set conflict-of-interest questions swirling, Jared Kushner's sister will not be holding a similar presentation that had been scheduled for Saturday. Nicole Kushner Meyer, who has been in China courting investors interested in the family firm's stateside real estate development, had drawn significant criticism for mentioning her family's White House connections in a pitch last weekend.

The number of new Hepatitis C cases leaped nearly 300 percent from 2010 to 2015, according to a report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the CDC points to the likely culprit behind the spike in cases of the infectious disease: the use of heroin and other injection drugs.

Former U.S. Rep. Corrine Brown has been found guilty of siphoning hundreds of thousands of dollars from a charity that she and her chief of staff had passed off as a scholarship service for students. The Florida Democrat had faced 22 counts ranging from conspiracy to tax fraud; she was convicted of 18.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has announced that as of next year, it will no longer participate in the Boy Scouts' programs for older teenagers.

This was not exactly the decision VG Media had hoped for.

The collective of German publishers had sued Google, arguing that the tech giant has infringed on copyright protections by offering snippets of the publishers' articles in search results. Those snippets, according to VG Media, hurt the publishers' bottom line by sating potential readers' curiosity and violated a 2013 German law that requires compensation for those snippets of text.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

Betsy DeVos spoke through waves of boos and shouted protests during her commencement speech at Bethune-Cookman University on Wednesday, delivering a celebratory address with what seemed at times to be grim-faced resolve.

French police say they evacuated several makeshift settlements in Paris on Tuesday, evicting refugees and other migrants from the tents they'd been living in for months. The operation, which involved about 350 officers, unfolded without reports of violence or injury.

Updated at 3:40 p.m. ET

Canceled flights, kerfuffles at the ticket counter, clashes with local law enforcement — it's fair to say that neither customers nor Spirit Airlines staff members intended their night to unfold this way at Florida's Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport.

Prosecutors announced Tuesday they will not level criminal charges at Brandon Bostian, the engineer involved in the 2015 Amtrak derailment that killed eight people and injured some 200 others in Philadelphia.

Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari has headed to London for "follow-up medical consultation with his doctors" — though his administration has not elaborated on what, precisely, his doctors will be addressing. The visit comes as concerns simmer over the president's health, which has attracted speculation as he misses cabinet meetings and makes infrequent public appearances.

James Patterson has a long history of collaboration. Of his dozens of books, the blockbuster thriller writer has written at least 50 — yes, five-zero — with the name of a co-author emblazoned on the cover.

Still, it's fair to say none of them has the resume of the fiction novice he's teaming up with now: former President Bill Clinton.

Six months ago, a deadly airplane crash wiped out most of the Brazilian soccer club Chapecoense. Nearly its entire roster — 19 players, as well as the manager and most of the coaching staff — were killed when the plane ran out of fuel in the mountains of Medellín, Colombia.

Surely you've heard by now: Sports as we know it has changed forever.

Go on, take a second if you need it. We'll wait here — but while we're at it, we'll leave this little reminder for the laggards who haven't heard what struck the decisive blow.

Yup: a pair of shoes. A $495 pair of shoes. Fronted by a college freshman who helped lead his team to the Sweet 16 in the 2017 NCAA tournament.

Warning: This post contains graphic photographs and video.

While President Nicolas Maduro has set the gears in motion for a new Venezuelan constitution, the confusion and violence that has engulfed city streets for more than a month only appears to be deepening.

It's been an awfully long time since a wolf pack has called Denmark home — roughly two centuries, in fact.

Updated at 10:34 a.m. ET Friday with Amazon's statement

The European Commission announced Thursday that it is concluding its antitrust investigation of Amazon over e-books, citing key changes to the contracts that inspired the probe in the first place.

The executive arm of the European Union had been wary of clauses that required publishers to alert Amazon about terms offered by the company's competitors — clauses that Amazon has now promised to modify.

North Korea doesn't have a whole lot of longtime friends on the world stage. In fact, as Pyongyang looks beyond its borders, it is likely to find only one world power ready to regularly defend its interests and actions in high-level international negotiations: China, its next-door neighbor, most important trading partner and staunch ally.

Puerto Rico has asked for a form of bankruptcy protection to help it grapple with more than $70 billion in public-sector debt. The unprecedented maneuver, requested by the governor and filed shortly afterward by a federal oversight board, sets in motion what would likely be the largest municipal debt restructuring in U.S. history.

There's a decent chance you — or someone you know — just got an odd email inviting you to edit a document in Google Docs. The email could be from a stranger, a colleague or a friend, but it's addressed to a contact that boasts a whole string of H's in its name.

In other words, it looks a little something like this:

Or, if you're looking at the invite in Gmail, it likely looks more like this:

Either of these look familiar to you? Here's a handy tip: Don't open the link.

Faced with a recent spate of violent videos and hate speech posted by users on its network, Facebook has announced plans for a heap of hires: 3,000 new employees worldwide to review and react to reports of harm and harassment.

"Over the last few weeks, we've seen people hurting themselves and others on Facebook — either live or in video posted later. It's heartbreaking, and I've been reflecting on how we can do better for our community," CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced Wednesday in a Facebook post.

Just half-a-year after a federal judge tossed out three lawsuits against Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk who grabbed headlines in 2015 for denying marriage licenses to same-sex couples on religious grounds, a court of appeals ruled Tuesday that the men suing Davis can continue their case.

When Matthew Bryce paddled out into the cold surf off the west coast of Scotland, he was clad in a thick, neoprene wetsuit — gear that would stand him in good stead for a solid surf session Sunday. But at less than an inch thick, that material may not have seemed the most important bit of equipment the 22-year-old surfer brought with him.

Protesters thronged outside a Seoul courtroom Tuesday, marking the start to Park Geun-hye's corruption trial with demonstrations both for and against the ousted South Korean president. In fact, the scene was so packed, one absence stood out all the more starkly: that of Park herself.

Authorities in South Sudan detained Eyder Peralta, NPR's correspondent in East Africa, for roughly four days before releasing him Monday morning. Peralta and his South Sudanese assistant were first placed in custody in the city of Juba on Friday, and they were held for three nights.

It remains unclear why they were detained.

Peralta flew home unharmed to his base in Nairobi, Kenya, on Monday morning. His assistant is still in custody, however, and NPR spokeswoman Isabel Lara says the organization is now "in touch with authorities regarding his release."

The city of San Francisco has settled with Airbnb and HomeAway, concluding a lawsuit brought by the two short-term home rental companies by agreeing to new registration procedures for prospective hosts. The case, which had been heard in federal court, hinged on how the companies comply with a recently instituted city law.

During his weekly televised address Sunday, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro announced that he was ordering a countrywide minimum wage hike. Beginning Monday, Venezuelans on the lowest rung of the economic ladder can expect a 60 percent boost to their monthly wages.

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