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A bipartisan group of four senators is calling for Congress to take a closer look at allegations that Russia used cyberattacks to try to influence the American election in favor of Donald Trump.

The reports should "alarm every American," Sens. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.; Jack Reed, D-R.I.; John McCain, R-Ariz.; and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said in a joint statement.

Just as the recount that he requested came to a conclusion, incumbent North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory conceded the gubernatorial election to Democratic state Attorney General Roy Cooper.

The Army Corps of Engineers has denied a permit for the construction of a key section of the Dakota Access Pipeline, granting a major victory to protesters who have been demonstrating for months.

The decision essentially halts the construction of the 1,172-mile oil pipeline just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Thousands of demonstrators from across the country had flocked to North Dakota in protest.

A police officer in Charlotte, N.C., will not face charges in the shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott.

Scott's death in September unleashed two days of unrest in Charlotte, when protesters took to the streets and in some cases threw objects at police and smashed windows.

R. Andrew Murray, the Mecklenburg County district attorney, said during a news conference Wednesday that he was "entirely convinced" that Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Officer Brentley Vinson "was lawful in using deadly force."

Donald Trump had a wide-ranging talk with New York Times journalists on Tuesday.

The president-elect disavowed the alt-right — a movement with views widely considered anti-Semitic and white supremacistand also dismissed concerns about his potential conflicts of interests. Times journalists live tweeted the meeting. Here are some highlights:

Danny Heinrich, a 53-year-old man who admitted to killing 11-year-old Jacob Wetterling in 1989, has been sentenced to 20 years in prison.

As we've reported, Heinrich admitted to the murder almost three decades after Wetterling went missing.

The police officer who shot and killed Philando Castile in a St. Paul, Minn., suburb in July has been charged with second-degree manslaughter.

Ramsey County Attorney John Choi said the use of force by St. Anthony police Officer Jeronimo Yanez was not justified. A review of dashboard camera video revealed that "no reasonable officer" would have used deadly force in this circumstance, Choi said.

Army Pfc. Chelsea Manning is asking President Obama to grant her clemency saying she is requesting "a first chance at life."

Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison after perpetrating one of the largest leaks of classified information in U.S. history.

Gwen Ifill, one of the most prominent political journalists in the country, has died, according to PBS. She was 61.

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The legalization of marijuana continued to expand as several states voted to legalize recreational and medical marijuana.

By a wide margin, California and Massachusetts voted to legalize recreational pot on Tuesday. Arkansas, North Dakota and Florida voted to legalize medical marijuana.

It's still too early to tell which way ballot initiatives in Arizona, Maine, Montana and Nevada will go. But the trend is positive for those in favor of legalizing marijuana and it's also part of a larger trend across the country.

Daniel Ortega, the former Marxist revolutionary leader, handily won a third presidential term in Nicaragua.

With almost 70 percent of the precincts reporting, Ortega received 72 percent of the vote. The Liberal Constitutional Party received 14 percent of the vote.

Of course, this result was very much expected, because earlier this year, courts essentially blocked the leading opposition coalition candidates from participating in the election.

If you thought Congress was done probing Hillary Clinton's email scandal, Rep. Jason Chaffetz, of Utah, has some news for you.

The Republican chair of the House Oversight committee told Fox News that new evidence turned over by the FBI pointed to a "quid pro quo" arrangement between the FBI and the State Department and that was grounds for at least "four new hearings" after Congress comes back from recess.

Jack Greenberg, one of the lawyers who argued the landmark Supreme Court case that ended federal tolerance of racial segregation in schools, died Wednesday. He was 91.

Greenberg was a giant of the Civil Rights era. He argued 40 cases before the nation's highest court, fighting against segregation, employment discrimination and the death penalty.

As Thurgood Marshall began a career on the federal bench that would eventually take him to the Supreme Court, he hand-picked Greenberg to take his place as the second director of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

The San Francisco Police Department disproportionately targets people of color, a review by the Justice Department's Office of Community Oriented Policing Services has found.

The 400-plus-page report found among other things:

-- Nine out of 11 use of deadly force incidents from 2013 to 2016 involved people of color.

-- Black drivers were "were disproportionately stopped compared to their representation in the driving population."

A federal appeals court ruled on Tuesday that the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was unconstitutionally structured by Congress.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit decided that an independent agency should not be run by a single individual.

More than five months after its last execution, Texas is set to execute Barney Ronald Fuller Jr., who was convicted of killing two of his neighbors.

After an almost three-year, defacto moratorium, Ohio plans to resume executions in the new year, the state's Department of Rehabilitation and Correction says.

Ohio has not put anyone to death since executing convicted killer and rapist Dennis McGuire in 2014. The state used a never-before-used combination of two drugs to execute McGuire, and it took him more than 20 minutes to die.

The Supreme Court has decided to hear a case that might decide whether the government can deny Washington's NFL team a trademark because it has deemed the team name is offensive.

The court granted certiorari on Lee V. Tam. If you remember, The Slants, an Asian-American rock band, sued the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office because it refused to trademark their name saying it proved offensive.

Take a look at this video:

If a word is spelled correctly, the pigeon has been taught to peck at the word. If it's spelled incorrectly, the pigeon is supposed to peck at the star. When it gets it right, the machine hands it some food.

A group of researchers from New Zealand were able to train four pigeons to consistently — with 70 percent accuracy — recognize dozens of words. The smartest pigeon learned about 60 words that it could distinguish from about 1,000 nonwords.

(This post was updated at 2:11 p.m. ET.)

Puerto Rico's governor, Alejandro García Padilla, has declared a state of emergency over a power outage that at its peak affected 1.5 million customers.

By morning that number had been cut by a couple hundred thousand, but more than a million customers on the island remained without electricity.

A major power outage has been reported on the island of Puerto Rico.

In a statement, the island's power company, Autoridad de Energia Eléctrica, said the outage is affecting customers throughout the island.

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative just announced one of its biggest investments to date: It is ponying up more than $3 billion to kickstart "Chan Zuckerberg Science," an initiative that plans to bring together multidisciplinary teams of scientists in an effort to prevent, cure or manage "all diseases in our children's lifetime."

These two guys may have accidentally disabled a pressure cooker bomb that was left on a sidewalk in Manhattan:

The FBI field office in New York just released that still from surveillance video because they want to talk to the men.

According to Jim Waters, the New York Police Department's counterterrorism bureau chief, the men picked up a piece of luggage that was left on the streets of New York this past weekend. They took out a pressure cooker bomb that was inside, but took off with the luggage.

A domestic dispute in 2014 triggered FBI scrutiny into New York-area bombing suspect Ahmad Khan Rahami.

A law enforcement official said that Rahami's father, Mohammad R. Rahami, had called New Jersey police over the dispute involving his son but later retracted his complaint.

When these types of complaints come in, they usually go into the FBI's Guardian Threat Tracking System, which prompts a limited level of investigation and surveillance.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission issued a formal recall of 1 million Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones on Thursday.

During a press conference, Chairman Elliot Kaye said consumers should "take advantage of this recall right away" because the phone represents such a "serious fire hazard."

Kaye said consumers should check the identifying number on the back of the phone at Samsung.com to determine whether their phone has a defective battery.

Republican politicians in North Carolina are lashing out at the NCAA after the sanctioning body announced it was relocating seven championship sporting events because of a state law limiting civil rights protections for LGBT people.

The law, known as HB2, has drawn wide condemnation and had already cost the state the 2017 NBA All-Star game.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it does not oppose the temporary halt of construction on the Dakota Access Pipeline, a $3.8 billion oil pipeline slated to run through four states, including North Dakota.

As we've reported, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe opposes the pipeline because it fears it could disturb sacred sites and affect the drinking water.

A demonstration against the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota turned violent on Saturday.

Demonstrators supporting the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe faced off with private security officers from Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners.

Video from the scene showed security officers threatening protesters with dogs.

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