Movie Reviews
2:16 pm
Fri August 15, 2003

Camp

The off-stage drama has the feel of a high-school play while on-stage performance is professional and delightful.

In this "Camp" the summertime learning is supposedly about performing in musicals. A regimen of one show every 2 weeks ("Follies," "Dreamgirls," and "Promises, Promises," for example) should have schooled even the best slacker, but the shenanigans outside of rehearsal unfortunately are the more important learning focus for most of the film.

The ensemble song ''Turkey Lurkey Time'' from "Promises" is proof of the cast's potential talent and that of director Todd Graff, who served as a counselor at the real camp, Stagedoor Manor. Yet Graff spends an inordinate amount of time on the sexual meanderings of the multi-ethnic teens, who are still struggling with their identity but having little problem exploring the question. Better would have been emphasizing the transformation of kids to actors through the guidance of the camp professionals.

Vlad, the rare heterosexual boy at this camp, is lucking out all over the place as the object of affections for gays and straight girls. Neither he nor most other actors in this film are more than the best of their high-school drama club. In fact, watching this film is like watching a good high-school musical.

In its favor, the film tries to be democratic. As Stephen Holden of the " New York Times" put it in contrast to "Fame":

"These teenagers -- black, white, Latino, gay and straight -- display a hip, easygoing candor, especially when it comes to sexual orientation, that's pretty much unprecedented for a teenager-slanted movie musical."

"Fame's" "Out Here on My Own" is done well, as is ''And I Am Telling You I'm Not Going'' from ''Dreamgirls." Also, some of the original songs are memorable, especially the ballads composed and written by "Fame's" Michael Gore and Lynn Ahrens. But "Fame" this film is not.

"Camp" overall is punctuated by some stunning vocal renditions interspersed with teen love affairs maybe even less interesting than that of J Lo and Ben Affleck. The off-stage drama has the feel of a high-school play while on-stage performance is professional and delightful.