All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm - 6:30pm

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting in context and transformed the way listeners understand the world. Heard by more than 10 million people on over 560 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of insightful news mixed with commentary and interviews, as well as special - sometimes quirky - features.

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Code Switch
6:44 pm
Sat June 29, 2013

Legalese Aside, How Do We Talk About Race Nowadays?

Field director Charles White of the NAACP speaks at a podium outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday. The court ruled that a key part of the Voting Rights Act is unconstitutional.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 7:07 pm

This was a week in which the country was reminded of our continuing struggle with race — and how we're still not quite sure how to talk about it.

The conversation started with the actions of the Supreme Court: A key provision of the Voting Rights Act was dismantled, and the University of Texas was told to re-evaluate its affirmative action policy.

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Sports
6:44 pm
Sat June 29, 2013

Back On The Ground, Nik Wallenda Dreams Up His Next Walk

Nik Wallenda practices walking across a wire in Sarasota, Fla., last week.
Chris O'Meara AP

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 7:07 pm

Daredevil Nik Wallenda of the famous "Flying Wallendas" family successfully walked on a 2-inch-thick cable across a 1,500-foot gorge near the Grand Canyon last week — without a net.

Back on solid ground, Wallenda says of course he has butterflies, but he doesn't get dizzy and there's no fear. He speaks with weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden about his latest death-defying walk on the high wire.


Interview Highlights

On training for the Grand Canyon

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Author Interviews
6:44 pm
Sat June 29, 2013

Lillian Leitzel, The Tiny, High-Flying 'Queen' Of The Circus

Leitzel is remembered as the first true circus diva.
Dean Jensen's collection Courtesy Crown Publishing Group

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 7:52 pm

In the first half of the 20th century, aerial performers — not elephants or tigers — were the big draw at circuses. And nobody was a bigger star than Lillian Leitzel, a tiny woman from Eastern Europe who ruled the Ringling Brothers circus.

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Sports
5:46 pm
Sat June 29, 2013

'I Am A Gay High School Basketball Coach'

Anthony Nicodemo is head basketball coach at Saunders High School in Yonkers, N.Y.
Courtesy of MSG Varsity

Originally published on Sun June 30, 2013 5:03 pm

When pro basketball player Jason Collins announced earlier this year that he was gay, Anthony Nicodemo was listening.

Nicodemo is the head basketball coach at Saunders High School in Yonkers, N.Y. At great risk to his cherished career, he recently decided to come out to his team.

"I said, 'You know, I always try to preach to you guys about being yourself and really being honest and open,' " Nicodemo recounts his story to NPR's Jacki Lyden.

"'I haven't been honest with you guys. I haven't been honest with a lot of people. I am a gay high school basketball coach.' "

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NPR Story
5:36 pm
Sat June 29, 2013

Measuring The African-American Financial Divide

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 7:07 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

We continue this week to dig into the findings of our poll of African-American communities and how black Americans rate many aspects of their lives. We conducted the poll with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health.

While the gap between the well-off and poor in the U.S. has stretched wide in recent years, we found that black Americans describe their financial divide as a nearly 50-50 split, and it affects how they view their world. NPR's Cheryl Corley reports.

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Movies
5:08 pm
Sat June 29, 2013

Rescued, Hitchcock's Silent Films Flicker Anew

Carl Brisson stars as sideshow boxer "One Round Jack" in Alfred Hitchcock's 1927 film The Ring. That and eight more of the master's early silent features have restored by the British Film Institute.
Rialto Pictures/BFI

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 7:07 pm

Alfred Hitchcock's early silent films have resurfaced in what's being called the single biggest restoration project in the history of the British Film Institute, and now "The Hitchcock 9" are touring the U.S. this summer.

Hitchcock is best known for his Hollywood suspense films of the post-war era, like Psycho and Vertigo. But the director was born in England and began his directing career there during the silent era. In fact, he loved both seeing and making silent films.

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Music Interviews
5:08 pm
Sat June 29, 2013

La Vida Bohème: Dance Rockers Harness Chaos And Conflict

La Vida Bohème's second album, Sera, draws upon a handful of musical influences, from disco to reggae.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 7:07 pm

Henry D'Arthenay grew up in Caracas, Venezuela — a country currently rife with political conflict. As lead singer of the Venezuelan alt-rock band La Vida Bohème, D'Arthenay used that chaos for fuel in constructing the band's latest album, Será, which was released in April.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
5:19 am
Sat June 29, 2013

The Movie Paul Feig Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Daniel Craig as James Bond in Casino Royale.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 7:07 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Same-Sex Marriage And The Supreme Court
9:22 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Same-Sex Marriages Resume In California

The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals lifted its injunction on gay marriages in California on Friday. They'd been on hold while the challenges to Proposition 8 worked their way through the appeals process.

NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
5:21 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Police Take Different Approaches To 'The Tyranny Of 911'

Miami Public Service Aide Tatayana Harris enters information into her laptop after clearing an accident in Miami's Little Havana community. Harris has been a Miami Police PSA for five years and hopes to become a police officer.
Marsha Halper for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 9:22 pm

When the 911 phone system was established, it gave citizens a fast, easy way to reach police in an emergency.

But it also created a logistical challenge for law enforcement: Police departments get so many calls, 911 can be as much a burden as a boon. Many calls are non-emergencies, and responding can take police away from situations where they're really needed.

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Business
4:17 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Puerto Rico Rolling Out The Welcome Mat For Millionaires

Children play on a beach in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The Puerto Rican government hopes that convincing wealthy investors to relocate here will boost the island's economy.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 9:22 pm

A few weeks ago, Alberto Baco Bague arrived in New York for a roadshow of sorts. In just 48 hours, Baco, Puerto Rico's secretary of economic development and commerce, met with more than 30 hedge fund managers, investors and others who could be classified as very well-off.

His mission might seem quixotic at best: trying to convince these well-heeled New Yorkers to uproot themselves from Manhattan and relocate to Puerto Rico. But he says they are starting to come.

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Music
4:17 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Bittersweet At No. 1: How A Japanese Song Topped The Charts In 1963

Underlying the sweetness of Kyu Sakamoto's unexpected hit song "Sukiyaki" was a story of sadness and loss.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 9:22 pm

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Around the Nation
4:17 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Coming To An Airport Near You: Fluffy Stress Relief

Therapy dogs Barney (rear) and Hazel are on the job comforting weary travelers at LAX.
Gloria Hillard NPR

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 9:22 pm

Summer travel is in full swing, and that means crowded airports, flight delays and long security lines. To help calm weary travelers, some airports are turning to man's best friend.

San Jose's and Miami's international airports have therapy dog programs, and Los Angeles International Airport — ranked the second-most-stressful airport in the country last year — launched its own crew of comfort dogs this year.

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Arts & Life
2:54 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Bullock And McCarthy, Packing 'Heat' (And Laughs) In Boston

'Heat' Stroke: The genius of this buddy-cop comedy is in its pairing of Sandra Bullock (left, as a by-the-book process nerd of an FBI suit) with Melissa McCarthy, who plays a sloppy Boston detective with no patience for procedure.
Gemma La Mana Fox

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 9:22 pm

Summer movies, as you may have noticed, are overwhelmingly male-dominated. But this summer, there's an exception: The Heat, a buddy cop flick with a distaff difference.

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Shots - Health News
2:15 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Polio Outbreak In Somalia Jeopardizes Global Eradication

Health workers vaccinate a boy against polio at a May immunization drive in Mogadishu, Somalia.
Farah Abdi Warsameh AP

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 9:22 pm

A big worry among people trying to wipe out polio is that the virus will regain a foothold, somewhere to launch a comeback — someplace, perhaps, like Somalia.

Polio has paralyzed 25 kids in Somalia and another six in a Kenyan refugee camp since early May, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative reported Wednesday. Before this outbreak, Somalia hadn't had a polio case in more than five years.

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The Salt
5:44 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Composting On The Way Up In New York City High-Rises

Compost bins at the Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket in Brooklyn, N.Y. are part of a pilot program to get New Yorkers to recycle their food waste.
Courtesy of Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 10:45 am

High-rise apartment buildings might not seem like fertile ground for making compost.

But officials in New York want to capture and recycle more of the city's food waste — even in some of the nation's most vertical neighborhoods. They're expanding a pilot program that's also trying to encourage composting by turning greenmarkets and libraries into drop-off sites for residents' food waste.

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Code Switch
5:44 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Moscato: The Gateway Wine For People Of Color?

Nicki Minaj is part owner of the coconut moscato brand MYX.
MYX

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 10:28 am

The wine of the moment — well, the past few years, actually — has been moscato. And its rise has been astronomical.

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Around the Nation
5:44 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Texas Gov. Calls Special Session, Reigniting Abortion Debate

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

The battle over a new abortion bill in Texas will resume now that Governor Rick Perry has called a second special legislative session. It's scheduled to begin on Monday. This past Tuesday night, an audience far beyond Texas watched as a Democratic state senator filibustered an anti-abortion bill for 12 hours. When Republicans cut her off, spectators jeered and the chamber erupted in pandemonium.

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Africa
5:44 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Opponents To Mark Morsi's First Year In Office With Protests

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Egypt's President, Mohammed Morsi, was sworn into office one year ago this Sunday. Opposition groups plan major protests to mark the anniversary. Egyptians face rising food prices, fuel shortages and power outages in blistering summer heat.

And Merritt Kennedy reports from Cairo, demonstrators are calling for early elections and vowing to stay on the streets until Morsi quits.

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Monkey See
8:00 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Telemundo's 'La Voz' Hands Latino Kids The Mic

Paola Guanche debuted with Adele's "Turning Tables."
Courtesy Telemundo

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:34 am

NBC's singing competition The Voice dominated the ratings game this spring and last fall. Now, the Spanish kids' version has become the top-rated show for NBC's sister network, Telemundo. The show, taped before an audience in Miami, features Latino children from the U.S. competing for a scholarship and a recording contract.

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