All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm - 6:30pm

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting in context and transformed the way listeners understand the world. Heard by more than 10 million people on over 560 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of insightful news mixed with commentary and interviews, as well as special - sometimes quirky - features.

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Music Interviews
12:08 pm
Thu January 19, 2012

Kathleen Edwards: A Breakup Song's Bigger Picture

Kathleen Edwards' new album is Voyageur.
Tanja-Tiziana Burd

Kathleen Edwards is a singer-songwriter from Canada who just released her fourth album, Voyageur. There's a lot of heartache and self-doubt on the record, and that makes sense — much of it was written around the time of Edwards' divorce from her husband and musical collaborator. The song "Pink Champagne" would seem to be a case in point: It takes place at a wedding where a young bride is second-guessing her decision. But Edwards says the message of that song isn't quite so literal.

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NPR Story
5:30 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

Two Democratic Allies Battle For One House Seat

Reps. Dennis Kucinich and Marcy Kaptur on Sept 20, 2011, in Solon, Ohio. The state's new congressional district map has the two veteran Democrats now competing for the same congressional seat.
Amy Sancetta AP

Originally published on Tue March 6, 2012 6:15 pm

Rep. Dennis Kucinich is most in his element when he's fighting against social injustice.

Wherever he sees an outrage against the little guy, you'll find the Ohio Democrat railing against it — like at a recent public meeting about a new trash-to-energy facility Cleveland wants to install in a west side neighborhood.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

High Court Rules In Favor Of Death Row Inmate

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 8:00 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court has given an Alabama death row inmate another chance to fight his execution. By a 7-to-2 vote, the court ruled Wednesday that convicted murderer Cory Maples, "through no fault of his own," was denied the right to appeal because he was abandoned by his lawyers.

Maples was convicted in 1997 of murdering two friends and was sentenced to death. There is no doubt that he committed the crime; the doubt is whether he could have avoided the death penalty if he had been properly represented at trial.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

Gettleman Discusses Violence In South Sudan

Audie Cornish speaks with Jeffrey Gettleman, East Africa bureau chief for the New York Times, about escalating violence in South Sudan.

Technology
3:00 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

Are There Workarounds For Wikipedia's Blackout?

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Well it may be difficult to access Wikipedia today, but it's not impossible. Here with some Wikipedia workarounds is Brian Cooley, the editor at CNET. Welcome back, Brian.

BRIAN COOLEY: Thank you, Robert.

SIEGEL: And first, I want you tell us some different ways to get around the Wikipedia blackout today.

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Opinion
8:58 am
Wed January 18, 2012

Hot To Trot: Dating With A Few More Wrinkles

Adult children are often surprised when their their over-60 parents hit the dating scene.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 9:00 am

Brian Unger is the host of the History Channel show How The States Got Their Shapes.

When we talk about our moms, many of us end up crying. Barbra Walters made her career exploiting this universal weakness. Newt Gingrich proved it recently, very publicly, in Iowa talking about his mom.

I'm going to try to control my emotions as I discuss my mom.

Because I'm not ashamed to say — lately, there have been a few tears.

My mom's not sick. No, she beat cancer.

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Country/Americana
2:29 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

The Little Willies: For The Wrenching 'Good Times'

The Little Willies' For the Good Times brings together five accomplished musicians of varying musical backgrounds.
Courtesy of the artist

It's been six years since The Little Willies released an eponymous debut album.

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Education
4:02 pm
Mon January 16, 2012

Do Law Schools Cook Their Employment Numbers?

Many law school students say they were lured in by juicy job numbers upon graduation, but when they got out, all they ended up with is massive debt.
Dan Kite iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Tue January 17, 2012 8:01 am

It's often assumed that even in tough times, lawyers can find good jobs. But that proposition is being overturned by a tight legal market, and by a glut of graduates.

The nation's law schools are facing growing pressure to be more upfront about their graduates' job prospects. Many students say they were lured in by juicy job numbers, but when they got out, all they ended up with is massive debt.

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Three Books...
3:39 pm
Mon January 16, 2012

Rebel Memoirs: Three Confessions From The Edge

istockphoto.com

These days, memoirs are often the target of contempt. A scathing slam in New York Times Book Review this year inveighed against "oversharing"; and in the New Yorker, the memoirist was likened to "a drunken guest at a wedding... motivated by an overpowering need to be the center of attention." If the narrative deals with socially unacceptable matters like abuse, addiction, family dysfunction, or even poverty, the scorn gets even thicker.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:53 pm
Mon January 16, 2012

Violinist Joshua Bell: 'French Impressions,' Yesterday And Today

Joshua Bell revisits the classic Violin Sonata by Cesar Franck on his new album.
Lisa Marie Mazzucco

When Joshua Bell was 21, he recorded an iconic piece of chamber music for piano and violin — the Sonata in A major by Cesar Franck. Today, Bell is 44 and he's recorded it again. It's on his new album, French Impressions, with pianist Jeremy Denk.

All Things Considered host Robert Siegel invited Bell to listen to his old recording for a little session of compare-and-contrast.

"Do you hear the same violinist?" Siegel asks, after playing for Bell the opening bars of his 1989 recording.

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Politics
6:04 pm
Sun January 15, 2012

Will The Real Ronald Reagan Please Stand Up

As president, Ronald Reagan raised taxes and granted amnesty to illegal immigrants. Would today's Reagan conservatives vote for him — or run attack ads?
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:07 am

It's no secret who the most popular Republican is in this year's GOP presidential race. In just one single debate last year, GOP candidates mentioned the former President Ronald Reagan 24 times.

Right now, each candidate is vying for the mantle of Reagan conservatism. Yet some historians, and even some of the folks who worked for Ronald Reagan, are now wondering whether Reagan himself was enough of a Reagan conservative — at least the way it is defined today.

So what exactly is a Reagan conservative anyway? If he were alive, could Reagan get the GOP nod?

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Around the Nation
3:34 pm
Sun January 15, 2012

Corner Perk Cafe's Customers Pay It Forward

The Corner Perk Cafe in Bluffton, South Carolina.
Mandi Brower Photography

At first glance, the Corner Perk Cafe in Bluffton, South Carolina seems like a regular neighborhood cafe, but in 2010, a customer's spontaneous act set it apart.

Thirty-year-old Josh Cooke, the owner of the Corner Perk describes when a woman came in one day and left a large bill.

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Monkey See
2:10 pm
Sun January 15, 2012

The Art Of The Modern Movie Trailer

Silent Screen idol George Valentin (Jean Dujardin) and Peppy Miller (Berenice Bejo), a young and upcoming dancer, share a vivacious moment on stage in Michel Hazanavicius's film The Artist.
The Weinstein Company

Originally published on Tue January 17, 2012 9:45 am

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Movie Interviews
11:21 am
Sun January 15, 2012

Ryan Tedder: A Hit-Maker With A Golden Touch

Ryan Tedder performs with OneRepublic in 2011.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

Originally published on Sun January 15, 2012 6:45 pm

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Author Interviews
4:49 pm
Sat January 14, 2012

Alan Bennett Defies Expectations With 'Smut'

Originally published on Sat January 14, 2012 7:14 pm

Alan Bennett, author of The History Boys and The Madness of King George, among countless other books, plays and memoirs, is a grand old man of British letters.

"I'm getting on now, and I'm thought of in England as being rather cozy and genteel — certainly in the stories that I write," he tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

So Bennett decided to give his readers a little rattle with a new book of two short stories called Smut.

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Author Interviews
3:13 pm
Sat January 14, 2012

The Inquisition: Alive And Well After 800 Years

When we talk of inquisition it is usually prefaced with a definite article — as in, The Inquisition. But, as Vanity Fair editor Cullen Murphy points out in his new book, God's Jury, the Inquisition wasn't a single event but rather a decentralized, centuries-long process.

Murphy says the "inquisitorial impulse" is alive and well today — despite its humble origins with the Cathars in France, where it was initially designed to deal with Christian heretics.

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Analysis
3:00 pm
Sat January 14, 2012

Week In News: Corporate Money And The Campaigns

Originally published on Sat January 14, 2012 7:14 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

(SOUNDBITE OF POLITICAL AD)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: A story of greed, playing the system for a quick buck, a group of corporate raiders led by Mitt Romney, more ruthless than Wall Street.

RAZ: That's part of an anti-Mitt Romney ad now running in South Carolina. The video is being distributed by pro-Newt Gingrich superPAC. And its message may be a sign of a growing philosophical split among the GOP candidates.

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Business
3:00 pm
Sat January 14, 2012

Breaking Down Bain Capital

Private equity firms are under the microscope this week as a pro-Gingrich superPAC hounds GOP candidate Mitt Romney for his role as head of Bain Capital. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz talks with Dan Primack, senior editor of Fortune Magazine, about how these firms operate and the legitimacy of these attacks.

Election 2012
3:00 pm
Sat January 14, 2012

Santorum Gets Backing From Social Conservatives

Originally published on Sat January 14, 2012 7:14 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Now, as the Romney campaign has been building momentum, religious conservatives remain deeply uncomfortable with him as the prospective Republican nominee. Today in Texas, evangelical leaders met. And as NPR's Joel Rose reports, they threw their support behind former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum.

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NPR Story
5:08 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

A Look At Romney's Olympic Legacy

At the opening ceremony of the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Mitt Romney (left) stands with President George W. Bush (center) and International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge (right) in front of the American flag that flew at the World Trade Center before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
George Frey AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:07 am

Ten years after the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics, there's still some debate about Mitt Romney's claim that he helped "save" the games — and about whether he used the Olympics to relaunch a fledgling political career.

In 1999, Romney accepted the job as CEO of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee (SLOC), five years after he failed to oust Sen. Ted Kennedy from his Massachusetts Senate seat.

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