All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm - 6:30pm

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting in context and transformed the way listeners understand the world. Heard by more than 10 million people on over 560 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of insightful news mixed with commentary and interviews, as well as special - sometimes quirky - features.

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Arts + Life
6:28 pm
Sun July 19, 2015

PETA Says Undercover SeaWorld Employee Posed As Animal Rights Activist

During the 2014 Tournament of Roses Parade, SeaWorld's float was accompanied by police in Pasadena, Calif. PETA supporters were arrested for protesting the float that day, and PETA claims that a SeaWorld employee posing as a PETA volunteer tipped police off to the protest.
Ringo H.W. Chiu AP

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 11:31 am

In recent years, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has waged a protest campaign against SeaWorld, saying that the U.S. theme parks' treatment of trained orcas is cruel. Now, PETA says it has identified a SeaWorld "agent" in its midst.

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Sports
5:36 pm
Sun July 19, 2015

Once Immune To Cord-Cutting, 'King Of Live Sports' Finds Throne Shaken

Ryan Phelan rehearses on the set of SportsCenter at ESPN's headquarters in Bristol, Conn., in 2007. Years ago, the network had been thought impervious to the seismic shifts shaking the cable landscape. Now, that appears to be changing.
Bob Child AP

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 9:18 pm

It's no secret that cable television is in trouble. With Hulu, Netflix and many networks streaming their shows online, viewers don't have to watch shows like Scandal or American Horror Story live. They can stream it the next day — or the next year.

Nevertheless, one channel had long looked impervious to the trouble: ESPN. Even as other channels suffered losses in subscriptions, the sports network was sitting pretty for one simple reason: People want to watch sports live.

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Environment
5:12 pm
Sun July 19, 2015

In Lake Mead, Lower Water Levels Make Exploring B-29 Wreckage Easier

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 4:29 pm

The reservoir outside Las Vegas is home to the wreck of a B-29 bomber that crashed in 1948. The region's drought has lowered water levels so much that scuba divers can now explore the wreck. (This story originally aired on Morning Edition on July 9, 2015.)

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My Big Break
5:12 pm
Sun July 19, 2015

From Adman To Stand-Up: Jim Gaffigan's Transition Took A Few Good Naps

Jim Gaffigan spent years in stand-up before, finally, someone took a chance on him: that someone just happened to be David Letterman. "The weird thing is, because Letterman thought I was good, everyone changed their mind," he says. "It changed the narrative surrounding me, completely."
Courtesy of TV Land

Originally published on Sat July 25, 2015 9:52 pm

As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

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Science + Technology
6:33 pm
Sat July 18, 2015

Birds, Bees And The Power Of Sex Appeal: The Ribald Lives Of Flowers

Stephen Buchmann Scribner

Flowers, bugs and bees: Stephen Buchmann wanted to study them all when he was a kid.

"I never grew out of my bug-and-dinosaur phase," he tells NPR's Arun Rath. "You know, since about the third grade, I decided I wanted to chase insects, especially bees."

These days, he's living that dream. As a pollination ecologist, he's now taking a particular interest in how flowers attract insects. In his new book, The Reason for Flowers, he looks at more than just the biology of flowers — he dives into the ways they've laid down roots in human history and culture, too.

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U.S.
6:33 pm
Sat July 18, 2015

Theodore Roosevelt's 'Summer White House' Reopens To The Public

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Shots - Health News
5:10 pm
Sat July 18, 2015

When Losing Memory Means Losing Home

Greg O'Brien and his wife are finding it more difficult to drive to and from their family's secluded house on Cape Cod. As they move out and move on, O'Brien has discovered a bittersweet trove of memories.
Sam Broun Courtesy of Greg O'Brien

Originally published on Sat July 18, 2015 6:33 pm

In this installment of NPR's series Inside Alzheimer's, we hear from Greg O'Brien about his decision to sell the home where he and his wife raised their three children. O'Brien, a longtime journalist in Cape Cod, Mass., was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's disease in 2009.

Greg and Mary Catherine O'Brien have lived in their house on Cape Cod for more than 30 years. It's their dream house. They used to imagine growing old there.

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World
5:10 pm
Sat July 18, 2015

In Northern Ireland, 'Terror Gets Old,' But Divisions Linger

Courtesy of Corinne Purtill and Mark Oltmanns

Originally published on Sat July 18, 2015 9:00 pm

In Northern Ireland, "the Troubles" — the long and bloody conflict between Catholic Irish nationalists and pro-British Protestants — formally came to an end with a peace agreement in 1998.

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Music Interviews
5:10 pm
Sat July 18, 2015

Leaving Los Angeles: Rickie Lee Jones Turns A Decade Into An Album

The new album The Other Side of Desire marks Jones' first original material in years, spurred on by a life-changing move to New Orleans.
David McClister Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 2:51 pm

If you turned on a radio in 1979, there was very good chance you'd hear the music of Rickie Lee Jones. At only 24, she leapt onto the world stage with her big single "Chuck E.'s in Love." Rolling Stone called her "the dutchess of coolsville."

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Parallels
5:14 pm
Fri July 17, 2015

Nuclear Deal Opens Up Potential For Investors In Iran's Stock Market

Iranian stockbrokers monitor share prices at the Tehran Stock Exchange in April. The historical Iran nuclear deal could open the country's market up to international investors.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 7:39 pm

Iran may not be fond of Western-style capitalism, but it has a stock market where shares in Iranian companies are traded.

And if sanctions are lifted following the nuclear deal, it could be where international investors road-test Iran's economy.

Earlier this week, just after the landmark deal about the future of Iran's nuclear program had been announced, Radman Rabii in Teheran was excited about the future.

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News
4:48 pm
Fri July 17, 2015

Military Recruitment Centers Have A History Of Being Targeted

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 7:39 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Around the Nation
4:48 pm
Fri July 17, 2015

The Flap Over 'Banana Derby': Some Don't See Monkey Jockeys' Appeal

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 8:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A moment now to explore the line between cute and cruel.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:48 pm
Fri July 17, 2015

The Rifleman Who Fiddled For Truman, Churchill And Stalin

Photo from The Rifleman's Violin, directed by Sam Ball, Copyright Citizen Film 2015.
Citizen Film

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 7:39 pm

Seventy years ago, shortly after defeating Nazi Germany, three victorious leaders met in Potsdam, just outside Berlin. President Harry Truman was there with British and Soviet leaders Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin. Stuart Canin was also there — he was a 19-year-old GI from New York City who played the violin.

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U.S.
4:08 pm
Fri July 17, 2015

Professor Delivers A Crash Course In Real Estate Investing To Detroiters

University of Michigan professor Peter Allen lectures to students during his real estate investing course.
Jason Margolis NPR

Originally published on Sun July 19, 2015 1:20 pm

You can snap up a home for just a few thousand dollars in Detroit these days. But just because a property is cheap, that doesn't necessarily make it a good investment.

Peter Allen with the University of Michigan is equipping local residents with housing investment know-how with the hope that they can go on to revitalize their neighborhoods.

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Around the Nation
4:03 pm
Fri July 17, 2015

Drought Drives Demand For Groundwater, As Well-Wishers Pile Up

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 7:39 pm

Copyright 2015 KJZZ-FM. To see more, visit http://kjzz.org/.

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Middle East
4:03 pm
Fri July 17, 2015

What Saudi Arabia Has At Stake In The Iran Nuclear Deal

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 7:39 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Law
7:17 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Aurora, Colo., Theater Shooter Found Guilty Of First-Degree Murder

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 8:34 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In Colorado, a jury has returned its verdict on James Holmes, the man on trial for killing 12 people and wounding more than 70 others in a movie theater three years ago.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Latin America
5:38 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

A Look Inside El Chapo's Prison Escape Through A Tunnel

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 7:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Law
5:38 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

'I Always Believed' Justice System Would Change, Says Prisoner Granted Clemency

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 7:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
5:22 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Employee Or Contractor? New U.S. Guidelines Could Reclassify Workers

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 10:45 pm

Until this spring, California port truck driver Alex Paz was considered an independent contractor. He had paid for fuel and registration of a truck, but the truck itself was owned by the trucking company. Some months, after the company deducted his costs, he ended up owing the company money.

"I didn't feel like I was working for myself," he says.

Under pressure from Paz and the Teamsters Union, the company reclassified him as an employee.

"It's a lot better because now you get paid. You know you're an employee," Paz says.

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