Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5am - 9am

About the Show: Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Business
5:18 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Samsung Shares Drop After Patent Verdict

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 6:35 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Samsung's slip.

This is the first trading day since Apple's win in a huge American patent battle with competitor Samsung. This weekend, the South Korean company was ordered to pay more than $1 billion in damages after a California jury found it copied features of Apple's iPhone and iPad.

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Remembrances
4:56 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Astronaut Neil Armstrong 'Embodied Our Dreams'

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 10:56 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED AUDIO)

NEIL ARMSTRONG: That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's remember the man who spoke those words on the moon. Neil Armstrong died on Saturday after a lifetime that inspired many people, including Neil DeGrasse Tyson, director of New York's Hayden Planetarium who is on the line. Good morning. Welcome back to the program.

NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON: Yeah, good morning. Thanks for having me back.

INSKEEP: So how did you meet Neil Armstrong?

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Analysis
4:56 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Politics In The News

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 6:47 am

The Republican National Convention will come to order at 2 p.m. in Tampa, Fla., and then quickly go into recess. Because of Tropical Storm Isaac, the main events have been delayed until Tuesday. This is the second convention in a row where the GOP had to delay the opening because of bad weather.

Law
4:01 am
Mon August 27, 2012

John Walker Lindh Sues For Prison Prayer Group

John Walker Lindh was captured in Afghanistan in 2002 after fighting with the Taliban.
File Photo AP

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 1:34 pm

John Walker Lindh was a middle-class kid in Northern California who converted to Islam and went to travel the world. U.S. authorities eventually captured him in Afghanistan after Sept. 11, when he was allegedly fighting alongside the Taliban.

His story was the focus of a Law and Order episode, and a song called "John Walker's Blues" by Steve Earle.

For the past five years, Lindh has been living in a secret prison facility in Indiana with convicted terrorists, neo-Nazis and other inmates who get special monitoring.

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Middle East
3:28 am
Mon August 27, 2012

In Distressed Syria, Urban And Rural Cultures At Odds

Syrian children, who fled their home with their family, take refuge at the Bab Al-Salameh border crossing, in hopes of entering one of the refugee camps in Turkey on Sunday.
Muhammed Muheisen AP

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 11:31 pm

After a month-long offensive in Aleppo, Syria's largest city, rebels are struggling under a fierce counter offensive by the Syrian military and the outcome is far from clear. But the future of Aleppo, the country's financial hub, is already under discussion in secret meetings on the Turkish border.

Over cups of sweat tea in a Turkish border hotel, Moeihmen Abdul Rahman, a lawyer from Aleppo, sits down for his first meeting with Abu Riad, a commander from the Al Tawheed brigade, a coalition of rebel militias leading the assault on Aleppo.

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It's All Politics
3:25 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Romney's Plan To Broaden Tax Base Finds Critics

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks at a town hall meeting in Grand Junction, Colo., on July 10. Romney says he wants to sharply cut income tax rates, but that those cuts would be revenue-neutral.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 1:22 pm

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney says he favors keeping all of the Bush-era tax cuts and then adding some more. To pay for these cuts, he would reduce or eliminate some of the tax deductions that many Americans have come to rely on. But his proposals are already facing a lot of resistance.

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Law
3:21 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Beard-Cutting Case Tests Limits of Hate Crime Law

Sam Mullet, in the front yard of his home in Bergholz, Ohio, last year, is one of 16 people charged in beard- and hair- cutting attacks on fellow Amish. Mullet denies being involved in the attacks.
Amy Sancetta AP

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 12:13 pm

Sixteen members of an Ohio Amish sect are set to go on trial in federal court Monday in Cleveland. The defendants are accused of violating U.S. hate crime laws by cutting the hair and beards of detractors, a humiliating reprimand for the devout.

Chin hair, according to Jacob Troyer, an Amish craftsman in Holmes County, Ohio, is a rite of passage for young Amish men.

"When they join church to get baptized, they grow a beard up to the bottom of the ear. They usually have an inch or so of space there. When they marry, they grow that together," Troyer says.

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U.S.
11:52 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Details Emerge In Shooting By Empire State Building

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 11:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Today's shooting in New York City draws special attention because of the location: at the base of the Empire State Building, perhaps the most famous building in New York, one of the most famous buildings in the world. The gunman opened fire there. Several people were shot and wounded. We're getting conflicting accounts of how many, although news photographs from the scene do show a number of people down on the ground.

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Around the Nation
8:26 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Simpsons Not A Big Seller For U.S. Postal Service

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 11:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with condolences to the U.S. Postal Service. The Post Office is stuck with hundreds of millions of stamps bearing the likeness of Homer Simpson. The service predicted the stamps would be twice as popular as Elvis Presley. One billion stamps were printed. Bloomberg reports only 318 million have been sold. An inspector general's report says that kind of overprinting adds to the post office money losses.

DAN CASTELLANETA: (as Homer Simpson) Doh.

Around the Nation
8:14 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Doctor Borrows Child's Bike To Make It To Surgery

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 11:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Dr. Catherine Baucom was late for surgery, but didn't give up. She was stuck in a massive traffic jam caused by an accident in Baton Rouge. And then she recalled a friend's house nearby and went to borrow a bike. TV station WAFB says the friend loaned his seven-year-old daughter's bike. So Dr. Baucom, almost six feet tall and wearing a green surgical outfit, pedaled for miles to surgery on a small, pink bike with a pink princess helmet. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Business
7:29 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Controversy Brewing Around Colombian Beer

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 11:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: duh. That's right, D-U-H.

That's a Colombian beer, and it's at the center of a brewing legal battle between two businessmen and 20th Century Fox. The golden ale was originally called Duff Beer, and it looks just like the beer served up at Moe's Tavern on "The Simpsons." But 20th Century Fox complained that the two brothers who founded the company were infringing on a trademark here - Duff, it's from "The Simpsons." So the brothers said they changed the name to DuH.

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Business
7:22 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Sony To Post Layoffs In Its Cell Phone Division

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:59 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a big patent ruling.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: This is a case of Apple against Samsung - and if that sounds familiar, it's because there's more than one patent case here.

While a jury in California deliberates a huge multibillion dollar patent infringement case, which we've been discussing this week, a ruling on a similar case with the same players has been issued today in South Korea.

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Books News & Features
7:16 am
Fri August 24, 2012

'No Easy Day' To Tell About Bin Laden's Death

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 11:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This week the publisher Penguin confirmed it is releasing a book about the raid that killed Osama bin Laden. The book is called "No Easy Day." And as of this morning, it is number one on Amazon's bestseller list, even though it is not due out until September 11.

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Around the Nation
7:16 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Corrections And Comments To Stories

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 11:56 am

In a commentary this week on Morning Edition, Frank Deford said the "proof is in the pudding." A listener wrote in to say that keeping proof in a pudding would be messy. The original proverb is: The proof of the pudding is in the eating. And what it meant was that you had to try out food to know whether it was good.

Sports
7:16 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Armstrong To Be Stripped Of Cycling Records

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 11:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And some other news on this eventful morning. Lance Armstrong says he is no longer fighting the doping case against him. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency says as a result the cyclist will be stripped of his seven titles on the Tour de France. NPR's Mike Pesca joined us to talk about it. Good morning.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

INSKEEP: How did this happen? Did Armstrong effectively admit guilt here by saying he's not fighting the charges?

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Politics
6:01 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Family Research Council Stands Behind Rep. Akin

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 11:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In Tampa, where Republicans are gathering for their convention, Todd Akin has been meeting with supporters, including the Family Research Council, which, like Akin, opposes abortion rights. Connie Mackey heads the council's political action committees.

Mr. Akin, as I'm sure you know very well, as he defended his action, he said he misspoke, but then he said that he had said one word in one sentence on one day that was wrong. Is that all he got wrong?

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Europe
6:01 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Breivik Sentenced To Prison For Norway's Mass Murder

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 11:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And we are also following a guilty verdict in the case of Norwegian mass murderer Anders Breivik. A court in Oslo also declared that he is competent, not insane. And we talked about this with Alan Cowell, a correspondent for the New York Times.

So what does this mean for Breivik?

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Movies
6:01 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Kenneth Turan Reviews: 'Robot And Frank'

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 11:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, the summer blockbuster season at the movies is nearly over, which means some smaller and more independent films are making their way into theaters. Film critic Kenneth Turan saw "Robot and Frank."

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Science
3:50 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Web Cartoonist Raises $1 Million For Tesla Museum

Tesla reads in front of the spiral coil of his high-frequency transformer at his lab on Houston Street in New York.
Marc Seifer Archives

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 1:12 pm

The only remaining laboratory of one of the greatest American inventors may soon be purchased so that it can be turned into a museum, thanks to an Internet campaign that raised nearly a million dollars in about a week.

The lab was called Wardenclyffe, and it was built by Nikola Tesla, a wizard of electrical engineering whose power systems lit up the Chicago World's Fair in 1893 and harnessed the mighty Niagara Falls.

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Middle East
3:46 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Massive Cyberattack: Act 1 Of Israeli Strike On Iran?

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (center) visits the Natanz Uranium Enrichment Facility in April 2008. Israel and the U.S. targeted the facility in 2009 with the Stuxnet cyberattack.
AP

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 8:42 am

Talk in Israel of a military strike on Iranian nuclear facilities has reached a fever pitch. Last week brought the news of an alleged "war plan" leaked to a blogger. This week, a well-informed military correspondent in Jerusalem reported that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is "determined" to attack Iran before the U.S. election.

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