The World

Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 7pm - 8pm
  • Hosted by Marco Werman

PRI's The World is a one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe. Launched in 1996, PRI's The World, a co-production of WGBH/Boston, PRI, and the BBC World Service, airs weekdays on over 200 stations across the country.

Japan's latest nuclear catastrophe, the meltdown of the Fukushima nuclear plant, has brought back memories for the children, grandchildren and great-grand-children of the Hiroshima A-bomb survivors, or “hibakusha.” It has also spurred some into offering help and advice to those who suffered potential radiation from Fukushima, and the uncertainty and discrimination that has come with it. That's coming up tonight at 7pm on The World, on 90.5 FM, WCBE Columbus.

We travel to the island of Ninoshima with reporter Aya Kano. Kano's first trip here was a revelation. She was assigned to cover the exhumation of bodies buried therein haste in the days after August 6, 1945. Previously bored by the Hiroshima's history, Kano became obsessed with it, and with how her own grandmother survived it. That's coming up Wednesday night at 7pm on The World on 90.5 FM WCBE, Columbus.

Sueko Hada was 7 when the A-bomb hit. She was the only survivor in her family. Now, though, she is surrounded by family including four great-grandchildren. Hada isn't bitter about what happened, but there's a sting in the tail of her A-bomb experience: one granddaughter met and married an American serviceman, and they now live in Colorado. Tune in for the next edition of this special series from The World, Tuesday night at 7pm on 90.5 FM WCBE, Columbus.

Tonight on The World, show producer Jeb Sharp introduces listeners to some women in Cape Town whose lives illustrate the kind of dislocation and violence families experiences under apartheid and how the effects linger in their lives today.

PRI's The World is curating conversations online sparked by protests in India that have been ongoing after a 23-year-old university student was gang-raped on a public bus in Delhi in December, and later died. The protest movement has spread from Delhi to London, and even here in Ohio. This experimental feature is called India’s Gender Troubles, and each week The World will focus on a specific topic – including global response to the event, the effect on India’s culture and more. To add your voice, tweet with the hashtag #worldgender.