Arts + Life

Arts + Life
7:46 am
Sun September 21, 2014

Adding Color To 'The Great White Way'

Sharp observations about race, class and gender plus pure passion for the theater: That's what get when you ask a distinguished panel of playwrights whether "The Great White Way" is still too white.
Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 21, 2014 11:15 am

Sharp observations about race, class and gender plus pure passion for the theater: That's what you get when you ask a distinguished panel of playwrights whether "The Great White Way" is still too white.

Award-winning dramatists David Henry Hwang, Lydia Diamond, Kristoffer Diaz and Bruce Norris are some of America's most critically acclaimed contemporary playwrights. Their work captures the tensions and aspirations of an increasingly diverse America, but they all acknowledged that it was a challenge to bring a more diverse audience to theaters.

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Arts + Life
1:47 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

His Camera Takes Us To The World 'We Must Preserve'

The photographer Sebastiao Salgado, in New York City on Thursday, says we are at a "special moment" — our world now needs to be protected from climate change and other forces.
Misha Friedman for NPR

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 3:36 pm

They're silvery and stunning — and their beauty bears a message.

"Genesis" is a new exhibit of more than 200 black-and-white images from the noted Brazilian photographer Sebastiao Salgado. He wants to show us what the world and its peoples look like now, how climate change has already had an impact — and what might be lost if Earth's climate continues changing.

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Arts + Life
11:11 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Millennial Generation Likes Old-Fashioned Technology: Books

Originally published on Sun September 14, 2014 3:44 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

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Arts + Life
4:12 am
Wed September 17, 2014

'Breaking Bad' Fans Get Their Fix In Spanish

In Metástasis, Diego Trujillo (center) plays Walter Blanco, a chemistry teacher who sells crystal meth with his former student José Miguel Rosas, played by Roberto Urbina.
Manuel Rodriguez UniMás

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 7:50 pm

How do you remake the award-winning AMC series Breaking Bad in Spanish?

Well, all you need — as the show's chemistry teacher-turned-drug dealer, Walter White, might say — is "a little tweak of chemistry."

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Arts + Life
2:37 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

'Mindy' And 'New Girl' Navigate Their Worlds Of Crazy Love

Danny (Chris Messina) and Mindy (Mindy Kaling) find themselves in a new position in the premiere of The Mindy Project.
Isabella Vosmikova Fox

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 3:48 pm

[This post contains information about where main characters stand relative to each other at the opening of the new seasons of The Mindy Project and New Girl. Be advised.]

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Arts + Life
5:11 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Iraq's Artists Defy Extremists With Bows, Brushes And A Low Profile

The Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra performs in Baghdad. The concert was promoted by word of mouth to avoid being targeted by bombs.
Graham Smith NPR

Originally published on Tue September 23, 2014 9:27 am

It's a hot night in Baghdad, and the national theater is packed with people who are here to see the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra.

They're fanning themselves with programs that show conductor Karim Wasfi, a striking man with thick eyebrows and a pointed beard, playing the cello. Tonight, he'll be conducting for the first time in more than a year.

Iraq has been in the headlines lately, with extremists taking over parts of the country, American airstrikes, the militias and the politics.

But the country was once a sophisticated center for learning and the arts.

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Arts + Life
1:16 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Australian Comic Finds Humor In Humiliation For His Sitcom 'Please Like Me'

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 2:19 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Arts + Life
3:09 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

As 'Boardwalk Empire' Comes To A Close, Creator Reminisces About Its Start

On Boardwalk Empire, Steve Buscemi's character, Nucky Thompson, is modeled after Enoch "Nucky" Johnson, the corrupt county treasurer of Atlantic City during the Prohibition years. The HBO show started its fifth and final season Sunday.
Macall B. Polay HBO

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 8:26 am

When HBO executives handed The Sopranos executive producer Terence Winter a copy of Boardwalk Empire by Nelson Johnson, he says they asked him if he could find a TV series in it. The book was about the history of corruption in Atlantic City through the 20th century.

"And [they] said ... 'Oh, by the way, Martin Scorsese is attached to this,' " Winter tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "So, without even reading the book, I said, 'Yes, there's a TV series in this, and I'm going to find it.' "

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Arts + Life
3:23 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Child Migrants Settle Uneasily In The Big Easy

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 9:05 am

Last June, 13-year-old Yashua Cantillano and his 11-year-old brother, Alinhoel, left their uncle's home in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, with a change of clothes in plastic bags, some snacks, water and their mother's phone number scribbled on a piece of paper.

Their guide and protector? Seventeen-year-old Sulmi Cantillano, their step-sister.

With the help of a smuggler, or coyote, Sulmi says, they got to the Mexican border city of Reynosa about 11 miles south of McAllen, Texas. They crossed the Rio Grande and turned themselves in to the U.S. Border Patrol.

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Arts + Life
3:28 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Dogged By Controversy, A Jewish Sect Is On The Move Again

Men from Lev Tahor shop in San Juan, Guatemala. In a culture of brightly colored clothing and clean-shaven men, the black suits and long beards stood out.
Jorge Dan Lopez Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 8:01 am

Picture a small village in the highlands of Guatemala.

Whatever your mental image, it's not likely to include ultra-Orthodox Jewish men in black suits and women covered head to toe. Yet, there they were, in the pueblo of San Juan la Laguna: members of a small Jewish sect known as Lev Tahor.

They fled Canada after being accused of child abuse. Now, they are on the move again.

Uriel Goldman, sitting on his porch in the village of San Juan, had a simple demand: "Leave us alone. This is minimum request."

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Arts + Life
3:53 pm
Thu September 4, 2014

Joan Rivers, An Enduring Comic Who Turned Tragedy Into Showbiz Success, Dies

Rivers became permanent guest host for The Tonight Show in 1983, a gig that ended when she left to host her own late-night show on Fox. Here she interviews Miss America Suzette Charles in 1984.
AP

Originally published on Fri September 5, 2014 6:49 am

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Arts + Life
9:53 am
Thu September 4, 2014

For 'Women In Clothes,' It's Not What You Wear, It's Why You Wear It

Artist Miranda July contributed a series of photos in which strangers try on one another's favorite outfits.
Michael Schmelling Courtesy of Blue Rider Press

Originally published on Thu September 4, 2014 5:36 pm

It can be hard to talk about clothes in an intelligent way. Fashion critic Kennedy Fraser once wrote in The New Yorker that the act of donning a garment can seem almost furtive or trivial, something beneath debate or intellectual content. The editors of Women in Clothes would agree that it's a challenge. The book collects essays, conversations, pictures and testimonials from more than 600 women talking about how clothes shape or reflect them as human beings.

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Arts + Life
3:32 am
Thu September 4, 2014

CBS's Thursday Night Football: An Ambitious Alliance With A Lot At Stake

Actor Don Cheadle will narrate the opening for each broadcast of Thursday Night Football.
Neil Jacobs CBS

Originally published on Thu September 4, 2014 1:49 pm

How much football is too much for TV?

That's the question CBS and the NFL may face Sept. 11, when the curtain rises on their ambitious experiment to build a new broadcast television home for pro football on Thursdays.

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Arts + Life
5:23 pm
Wed September 3, 2014

You Can Buy Happiness, If It's An Experience

First the cathedral and then the cafe? Experiences like travel bring greater satisfaction than material goods, researchers say.
Dangubic/iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu September 4, 2014 4:53 pm

We humans spend a lot of time waiting in lines: People queue up for days in order to get their hands on the latest iPhone, or what feels like eons for a table at that hip new brunch place.

You may be better off spending time and money on the latter. A growing body of research has shown that experiences tend to make people happier than material possessions.

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Arts + Life
8:56 am
Wed September 3, 2014

A Giant Appears At The Edge Of An African Roadway

Courtesy of Marco Cianfanelli

Originally published on Wed September 3, 2014 6:40 am

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Arts + Life
5:15 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

In Tom Hanks' iPad App, Typewriters Make Triumphant Return (Ding!)

Actor and typewriter aficionado Tom Hanks says typing on a typewriter "is only a softer version of chiseling words into stone."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed September 3, 2014 5:06 pm

Tom Hanks' love affair with typewriters began in the 1970s, with his first proper typewriter — a Hermes 2000. Typewriters are "beautiful works of art," he tells NPR's Audie Cornish. "And I've ended up collecting them from every ridiculous source possible."

Hanks admits he started his collection when he had a "little excess cash" but, he points out, it's "better to spend it on $50 typewriters than some of the other things you can blow show-business money on."

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Arts + Life
4:08 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

For Men's Rights Groups, Feminism Has Come At The Expense Of Men

Mike Buchanan gives his presentation, "Let's Get Political," at the International Conference on Men's Issues, held in June near Detroit. Buchanan founded a political party in the U.K., Justice for Men & Boys, in 2013.
Fabrizio Costantini Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 7:14 pm

This summer, a few hundred men and a handful of women gathered in a VFW hall near Detroit to attend what organizers billed as the first International Conference on Men's Issues.

The crowd wasn't huge, but it was enthusiastic. The event was a real-world gathering organized by the website A Voice for Men, part of an informal collection of websites, chat rooms and blogs focused on what's known as the men's rights movement. Speaker after speaker insisted that history would remember this moment.

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Arts + Life
1:25 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

Celebrity Photo Leak Puts Spotlight On The Cloud, And Security

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 4:09 pm

The FBI and Apple are looking into how private photos of Jennifer Lawrence and other celebrities were stolen, in an apparent breach of security that is raising new questions about storing personal information online.

"This is a flagrant violation of privacy," Lawrence's spokeswoman said Sunday, after nude images of the actress and others began to emerge online. Some of the celebrities have denied the photos are of them; others, such as Mary Elizabeth Winstead, say they deleted the images long ago.

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Arts + Life
1:03 pm
Fri August 29, 2014

A Photographer Captures The Often-Overlooked 'Aunty' Couture

Poonam Aunty
Meera Sethi Upping the Aunty

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 1:07 pm

"Ugh, she dresses like SUCH an aunty!" is usually not something you'd want to hear about your style, if you're South Asian.

An "aunty" or "aunty-ji" (depending on where you want to fall on the graph of respect and familiarity) is what you call a lady roughly around your mother's age. So, the family friend who has seen you grow up, your mom's co-worker, the lady next to you in the grocery line or the nosy neighbor whose questions about your love life you endure because she makes a killer biryani — they all qualify.

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Arts + Life
9:50 am
Fri August 29, 2014

A Teenager In The 1950s, Extreme Sledding For The Air Force

Alton Yates says the trip on the high-speed sled could be painful, and frightening. But he also says, "We were anxious to get strapped into that seat to conduct the next experiment."
Courtesy of Alton Yates

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 8:00 am

In the mid-1950s, Alton Yates was preparing to graduate from high school. His mother had recently passed away, and his father was struggling to raise seven kids on his own.

"I knew that as soon as I finished high school I was going to have to help with taking care of the family," Yates tells his daughter, Toni, on a visit to StoryCorps in Jacksonville, Fla.

Most of the jobs available to him wouldn't pay well, so he decided to join the Air Force. They were looking for volunteers to help test the effects of space travel on the human body.

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