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FCC To Roll Back Net Neutrality Rules

Nov 21, 2017

Ajit Pai, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, announced Tuesday that the agency will repeal net neutrality rules put in place by the Obama administration. The change is seen as a victory for the telecommunications industry, while tech companies are largely in favor of keeping net neutrality.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Tony Romm (@TonyRomm), senior editor of policy and politics for Recode.

Cities like San Jose, Seattle, Boston and Las Vegas have seen big growth in home prices over the past year. But Chicago — one of America’s biggest metro areas — continues to see much slower growth.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd (@odowdpeter) went on a tour of the housing market with Chicago realtors.

DOJ Moves To Block AT&T-Time Warner Merger

Nov 21, 2017

The Justice Department has filed a lawsuit to block the proposed $85 billion merger of AT&T and Time Warner. It’s an unusual move, complicated by President Trump’s ongoing conflict with CNN, owned by Time Warner.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd talks with MSNBC’s Ali Velshi (@AliVelshi).

'Tis The Season For Holiday Jobs

Nov 21, 2017

Cyber shopping is not only changing the way consumers make purchases — it’s also providing more seasonal jobs.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Andrew Challenger (@AndyChallengeHR), vice president of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, an outplacement and career transitioning firm, about the seasonal job market.

Organic food is a $40 billion industry and growing. That has the attention of some farmers discouraged by years of low prices for their conventional crops.

Harvest Public Media’s Grant Gerlock (@ggerlock) has the story of a Nebraska farm making the switch to tap into the lucrative organic market.

While PayPal still leads the way in the mobile payment industry, tech giants like Apple and Amazon are trying to get a bigger share of the pie.

The Wall Street Journal’s Emily Glazer (@EmilyGlazerWSJ) joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to explain.

Republican lawmakers are pushing forward versions of their federal tax system overhaul. A Senate tax committee will hammer out details of one plan on Monday and the House will vote on a similar bill as soon as Thursday. One point of contention is how to address the estate tax, which applies to inheritances of more than $5.5 million.

General Electric announced Monday morning it’s cutting its dividend in half and restructuring its business model.

Michael Regan (@Reganonymous) of Bloomberg News joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss how the company will refocus its core businesses.

Trump Pushes 'America First' Trade In Asia

Nov 13, 2017

President Trump addressed regional leaders Friday at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Danang, Vietnam, saying that his administration will not tolerate trade “violations, cheating, or economic aggression” from other countries.

NPR’s Anthony Kuhn (@akuhnNPRnews) joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson with the latest.

This week, United made its last flight on a Boeing 747 aircraft. Delta will be retiring the 747 by the end of the year, which means no North American passenger airlines will operate the “Queen of the Sky.”

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Clive Irving, aviation correspondent for The Daily Beast and author of the book “Wide-Body: The Triumph of the 747,” about the end of the 747 era.

The Senate has released its own version of the GOP tax overhaul plan, and there are some differences with the House version of the bill.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson takes a closer look with Michael Regan (@Reganonymous) of Bloomberg News.

Digital lip-syncing aimed at teens is officially a big, big business: Chinese tech company Bytedance has announced it plans to "merge" with — acquire — Musical.ly, a popular lip-synching app launched in China in 2013.

Financial terms of the deal weren't included in today's announcement, but news reports put the deal's value at between $800 million and $1 billion.

At Green House Data in Cheyenne, Wyo., energy efficiency is an obsession.

When someone enters one of the company's secured data vaults, they're asked to pause in the entryway and stomp their shoes on a clear rubber mat with a sticky, glue-like finish.

"Dust is a huge concern of ours," says Art Salazar, the director of operations.

That's because dust makes electronics run hotter, which then means using more electricity to cool them down. For data centers, the goal is to use as little electricity as possible, because it's typically companies' biggest expense.

Robert Sauchelli doesn't have a solar panel, but he's all for the idea — before he retired, he devoted 21 years to energy efficiency work at the Environmental Protection Agency. To show his support, Sauchelli has been paying an extra 7.4 cents per kilowatt-hour to a clean power company, called Green Mountain Energy, through his energy supplier in Brooklyn, Con Edison.

Did you know the United Kingdom is one of the most generous countries in the world when it comes to aid for global health and development?

The amount given in 2015 was the equivalent of $18.7 billion in U.S. dollars. That's second only to the $31.08 billion from the United States. It's an impressive total given the comparative size of the two countries and their economies.

Accidents happen, and if they are someone else's fault, you can go to court to try to get compensation for your medical expenses, lost wages and pain and suffering. If you win, though, the pot of gold you receive may be considerably smaller than you expect. Your health plan may claim some — or all — of the award as reimbursement for money it spent on your medical care.

(This post was last updated at 6:15 p.m. EDT.)

Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew announced on Wednesday that the countenance of abolitionist leader Harriet Tubman will grace a new $20 bill.

The decision caps a public campaign asking for a woman to be placed on American paper currency and months of deliberation by the Treasury to replace either Alexander Hamilton on the $10 bill or Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill.

Carmaker Mitsubishi Motors says "improper conduct" resulted in 625,000 of its vehicles getting inflated gas mileage ratings, in a scandal that's centered on minicars made for Japan's market.

The cars in question are Mitsubishi's eK Wagon and eK Space, as well as the Nissan Dayz and Dayz Roox (which the industrial giant made for Nissan Motors). While the scandal seems to be limited to the Japanese domestic market, Mitsubishi says it is now investigating vehicles it made for overseas markets as well.

The Sony Corporation has announced it will pay Michael Jackson's estate $750 million for Jackson's 50 percent share of the Sony/ATV music publishing company.

The backstory here has more twists and shouts than a long and winding road (Couldn't resist, but note that the rights to both "Twist and Shout" and "The Long and Winding Road" belong to Sony/ATV). Sony's purchase marks the culmination of one of the most remarkable stories in the history of the music business.

In a decision that triggers hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of payments to consumers, the Supreme Court on Monday denied Apple's request to hear its appeal of a lower court's ruling that the tech company had illegally fixed prices with publishers of e-books.

"The Justice Department says today's decision means Apple's liability in the price fixing case is settled once and for all," NPR's Lynn Neary reports. "The Supreme Court let stand a $450 million settlement reached in a lower court in 2014."

The U.S. economy gained 242,000 jobs in February while average wages dropped slightly, according to a Bureau of Labor Statistics report released Friday.

The unemployment rate held steady at 4.9 percent.

The report indicates stronger job growth than expected, and an improvement over the previous month. January's count of 151,000 new jobs — far lower than had been anticipated — was revised upward, to 172,000. And the job gains for December were also revised upward, from 262,000 to 271,000.

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Apple's legal battle with the FBI over iPhone encryption continues: A federal magistrate, at the FBI's request, has ordered the tech giant to write software to help investigators circumvent iPhone security features to access a phone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters. Apple is fighting the order, calling it dangerous, illegal and unconstitutional.

Today was the deadline for amicus briefs, or "friend of the court" filings in the case.

Last November, Amazon did the unthinkable for an online retailer known for undercutting brick-and-mortar bookstores: It opened a walk-in store in Seattle. Now, there's talk that Amazon plans hundreds of them.

On an investor call Tuesday, Sandeep Mathrani, CEO of mall operator General Growth Properties, said: "You've got Amazon opening bricks and mortar bookstores, and their goal is to open, as I understand, 300 to 400 bookstores."

Yahoo, the Internet pioneer, continues to lose money. Tuesday in its fourth-quarter report, the company said it had a loss of $4.4 billion.

It's also laying off about 15 percent of its workforce and closing offices in five locations. Yahoo says it will explore "strategic alternatives" for its struggling Internet businesses including getting rid of services and assets that CEO Marissa Mayer has decided are not worth continued investment of time and money.

Business travelers increasingly are relying on Uber and other ride-hailing services, often more than car rentals or taxis, according to new data.

Say you land at Chicago O'Hare International Airport. You've got a work meeting 20 minutes away. You might head to the rental desk to pick up a car. Or, you might call an Uber instead.

"More transactions coming through our system are in Uber than there were in all the rental car transactions," says Bob Neveu, CEO of Certify, a company that businesses use to book travel and track receipts.

Hundreds of thousands of people drive for Uber in the U.S. The ride-hailing company has had high-profile fights in courts and city halls over the status of these drivers: Are they employees or contractors? Can they unionize?

A fight that's gotten far less attention — one that may affect drivers far more — is the competition between Uber and its main rival, Lyft.

Competition for drivers is so great that, about a year ago, Uber sent covert operatives into Lyft cars — to recruit.

Isabella Dure-Biondi was one of these covert operatives.

This day is starting out really nasty if you happen to be an oil driller — or a baby boomer who would like to retire with a nest egg.

Through the night and into the morning, the price of oil has been falling. You can now buy a barrel for less than $30. (Remember, it was nearly $115 as recently as June 2014.) The market for oil has been thrown into disarray because of worries about possible declining Chinese demand and surging Iranian supplies.

That means U.S. oil producers will continue to see their profits plunge and industry layoffs worsen.

Back in the '70s at auto shows across the country, you could find Anita Mitzel wearing an extravagant gown and reciting scripted monologues in front of a shiny Cadillac that would slowly spin on a turntable. All these years later, she can still recite them.

Goldman Sachs will pay about $5 billion to resolve state and federal investigations into its handling of mortgage-backed securities in the years leading up to the 2008 financial crisis, the bank said today.

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