Business

12:56 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Thinking Beyond Fixed-Income Investments

I hope you enjoy my video this month on fixed-income investments. Back in the old days, people would say, "Well, as we approach retirement, we have more in bonds and CD's because that provides us with a steady flow of income." Well today, with interest rates as low as they are, you can't survive on income that's in the 1.5 to 2% range. I believe that you have to look at alternatives. I'd be glad to speak to you personally about your financial investment needs and concerns. Please contact me at 614-888-2121 or send an e-mail to chornyak@chornyak.com.
Today, with interest rates at 60-year lows, it's extremely difficult to get the income that we need from traditional types of fixed-income investments. For example, dividend-paying stocks may provide an income stream that is higher than today's fixed-income bonds. You can't just look at income in a vacuum, you have to consider the impact of inflation and taxes.
All Tech Considered
8:34 am
Wed September 12, 2012

Do iPhone Announcements Get More Attention Than They Deserve?

There will be a lot of questions about the iPhone 5 before its release Wednesday. Less popular among them: Why do we care so much?

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The Two-Way
9:27 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Government To Sell Controlling Interest In Bailed-Out AIG

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 9:59 am

Remember the dark days of 2008 when insurer American International Group Inc., better known as AIG, nearly collapsed under the weight of the mortgage crisis before Washington rode to the rescue to the tune of $182 billion?

Then there was the public outrage when AIG executives got millions in bonuses after receiving the largest of all of the Wall Street bailouts.

Since then, the New York-based insurance giant has been essentially a government-owned enterprise, with Uncle Sam holding a controlling share.

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Fri September 7, 2012

High Unemployment & Slow Job Growth: Likely News From Today's Report

At a job fair in San Diego this week, Navy Sailor E-5 Cedric Washington spoke to Sim Garriotti from Lockheed Martin while interviewing for a potential position.
Sandy Huffaker Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:34 am

The number of jobs on private and public payrolls grew by just 96,000 in August from July, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said this morning.

Meanwhile, the nation's unemployment rate edged down to 8.1 percent from 8.3 percent the month before. Often, the jobless rate dips even when employment growth is weak because the size of the labor force shrank as many Americans gave up looking for work.

It's a report that will surely add to the presidential campaign rhetoric.

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Business
3:21 am
Wed September 5, 2012

'Quite Good' May Not Be Good Enough For GM

The General Motors logo is displayed atop the Renaissance Center in Detroit. The automaker, while doing much better following the government bailout, is still lagging some of its competitors.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Wed September 5, 2012 4:54 pm

When you talk to car people about General Motors, they all say the company has gotten better.

"I think General Motors, productwise, is in a better position than it's been in a decade or so," says Jack Nerad of Kelley Blue Book. "The new products, we feel ... are all quite good."

Like many people, however, Nerad adds an important caveat. He says GM's improvement doesn't mean the company is completely out of the woods, because the competition is very good as well.

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The Salt
2:07 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India

Even this Maharaja Mac, made specifically for the Indian market, will be off the menu at the new vegetarian McDonald's in India.
kawanet Flickr.com

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 4:13 pm

McDonald's, home of the iconic Big Mac, is going vegetarian. Well, at least in India, where 20 to 42 percent or more of the population (depending on how you count) eschews meat, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization.

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The Salt
8:53 am
Mon September 3, 2012

No More Shame: Boxed Wine Now Comes In A High-End Fashion Purse

Vernissage is trying to revamp boxed wine to attract a more sophisticated customer.
Vernissage

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 4:14 pm

Ladies, if the thought of showing up at a party or a picnic with a box of wine seems a little gauche, there's now a product for you: Vernissage's "bag-in-a-bag" of wine. It's boxed wine, shaped like a handbag.

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The Two-Way
8:53 am
Wed August 29, 2012

U.S. Economy Grew At 1.7 Percent Annual Rate In Second Quarter

The Bureau of Economic Analysis revised its GDP numbers today, saying that during the second quarter of this year, the United States economy grew at a 1.7 percent annual rate.

That's up from its original estimate of 1.5 percent.

The BEA reports:

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The Two-Way
6:48 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Computer Troubles Freeze United Airlines' System, Bringing A Cascade Of Delays

Two United Airlines planes sit at a terminal at San Francisco International Airport Friday. The airport briefly refused to accept any domestic arrivals Tuesday, after a computer crash disrupted United's system.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 3:51 pm

Many travelers using United Airlines faced delays Tuesday, but they weren't connected to Hurricane Isaac. Instead, the airline's computer network crashed, leaving large parts of its system paralyzed Tuesday afternoon.

First noted around 2:15 p.m. EDT, the problems persisted until about 6:30 p.m. EDT, when the airline tweeted that it is "in the process of resuming operations and rebooking customers."

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The Salt
5:53 pm
Wed August 22, 2012

Food Waste Is Overwhelming. Here Are Five Things People Are Doing About It

Rotten jackfruit and tomatoes are sorted at a dump in New Delhi. India loses an estimated 40 percent of its produce harvest for lack of infrastructure. And Americans waste about 40 percent of our food.
Mustafa Quraishi AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 5:39 pm

The food world is buzzing today about the latest news on just how often we waste perfectly good food. And we admit, the statistics are pretty depressing.

About 40 percent of food in the United States today goes uneaten. The average American consumer wastes 10 times as much food as someone in Southeast Asia — up 50 percent from Americans in the 1970s. Yet, 1 in 6 Americans doesn't have enough to eat, says the U.S. Department of Agriculture. And food waste costs us about $165 billion a year and sucks up 25 percent of our freshwater supply.

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Law
4:51 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Jury To Decide Apple's Patent Case Against Samsung

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 4:10 pm

What your next smart phone or tablet computer might look like is in the hands of a California jury. In one of the biggest patent infringement cases ever, Apple is suing Samsung — charging that in creating its products, Samsung ripped off iPhone and iPad technology. Samsung countered with its own allegations.

This case is complex, the legal issues are daunting, and the jury's decision has to be unanimous.

"What's at stake here is the future of smartphones and the tablet market," says intellectual property expert Christopher V. Carani.

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Around the Nation
12:46 am
Mon August 20, 2012

Study Reveals The Geography of Charitable Giving

Attorneys Cheryl Curtis and her husband, Dana Foster, live in Washington, D.C., and donate generously to a nearby nonprofit that helps low-income residents. "Now that I have more, I want to give to organizations that provide just basic food for people," Curtis says.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 1:50 pm

Ever wonder how charitable the people are who live in your state or community? It turns out that lower-income people tend to donate a much bigger share of their discretionary incomes than wealthier people do. And rich people are more generous when they live among those who aren't so rich.

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Economy
7:46 am
Fri August 17, 2012

Low Mortgage Rates Boost 'Serial Refinancers'

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 2:35 pm

Refinance activity continues to boom, fueling the home-loan market. Low interest rates have created a class of "serial refinancers" — those lucky enough to borrow at lower rates — and given them new opportunities to spend their freed up cash.

Settlement attorney Robert Gratz never used to be on a first-name basis with his clients.

"In the past, our practice was such that you'd see people, and that was the end of it," he says.

Gratz now sees the same faces all the time, of clients refinancing again and again — these days in the mid-3 percent range.

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Your Money
2:59 am
Fri August 17, 2012

Student Loans Can Dent Retirees' Social Security

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 2:37 pm

Families often pull together to help finance a college education, with parents and grandparents chipping in or co-signing loans. And now, a SmartMoney report finds the U.S. government withholding money from Social Security recipients who've stopped paying on federal student loans.

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Media
6:44 am
Wed August 15, 2012

The Next Frontier In TV: English News For Latinos

Millions of Americans rely on Univision anchor Jorge Ramos to tell them about the news, but his children aren't among them. Like many Latinos who've grown up in the U.S., they get their news in English.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 12:15 pm

This is the third in a three-part series about major American networks trying to appeal to a broader Latino audience.

Jorge Ramos has a humbling problem.

He is one of the best-known Hispanics in the U.S. and a respected news anchor for the Univision networks on which millions of Americans routinely rely.

And yet, in Ramos' telling, his 14-year-old son, Nicolas, and his 25-year-old daughter, Paola, don't watch his newscasts.

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The Salt
11:14 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Reach For The Fries? Apple Slices Recalled For Possible Listeria Contamination

This apple-topped salad is one of several products being recalled for potential contamination with the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes
Ready Pac, Inc.

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 11:29 am

If you've been applauding yourself recently for choosing the apple slices over the french fries for your kid's fast food meal, or an apple-laden prepackaged salad for your own dinner, you might want to hit the pause button.

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The Two-Way
7:46 am
Mon August 13, 2012

Google Cutting 4,000 Jobs At Motorola; 1,300 Of Them Are In U.S.

Motorola's Droid Razr Maxx.
David Becker Getty Images

Google is eliminating about 20 percent of the jobs at Motorola Mobility, the struggling cellphone manufacturer it finished acquiring earlier this year for $12.5 billion, according to reports from The New York Times, Dow Jones' All Things Digital blog and other news outlets.

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Europe
3:29 am
Mon August 13, 2012

Poland Watches Warily As Euro Crisis Spreads

One of the latest additions to Poland's growing luxury goods market, the Wolf Bracka department store, beckons shoppers in the heart of the Polish capital, Warsaw. The country's economy continues to grow, but Poles are anxiously watching the crisis in the eurozone.
Czarek Sokolowski AP

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 8:51 pm

One factor that has kept Poland somewhat insulated from the eurozone crisis is domestic consumer spending. Poland had more than 4 percent growth last year while the rest of the continent was mired in negative or flat growth. Poles have more discretionary income than ever before, and they're using it to buy things in swank malls cropping up all over the country.

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Around the Nation
5:51 am
Sun August 12, 2012

Maine Lobstermen Give Farming Sea Scallops A Try

As lobster prices plunge, scallops offer fishermen an alternative to make money.
Levi Bridges for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 1:57 pm

If you don't love scallops, you probably just haven't had one that's cooked properly. That is, pan fried with some garlic and butter and herbs. They are very tasty.

In Maine, scientists and fishermen are learning how to farm, instead of catching, these tasty sea critters. That could be good for business and the environment.

Out on the water off Stonington, Maine, Marsden Brewer is motoring his lobster boat through the crowded fishing harbor. Today, just about all the boats here are lobster boats. But 30 years ago, he says, it was a different story.

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Planet Money
2:59 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Why Don't More Unemployed Spaniards Get Jobs In Germany?

Jobs ahead.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 11:22 am

Zoe Chace and Robert Smith are reporting from European borders this week. This is the third story in a four-part series.

The eurozone was supposed to create one big labor market by making it easy to cross borders for work.

But Gerhard Wiegelmann, a CEO in Stuttgart, Germany, can't find enough workers to staff his company — even with unemployment in Spain over 20 percent. He's had to turn down projects because he can't hire enough people.

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