Education

Education
5:01 am
Thu September 4, 2014

Gentlemen, Preschool Is Calling

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu September 4, 2014 9:06 am

Glenn Peters knew he would be in the minority when he started training to teach preschool as part of New York City's rollout of universal pre-K, the largest such initiative in the country. But he didn't realize just how rare men are in the profession until he attended a resume-building workshop for aspiring pre-K teachers.

"They couldn't find the bathroom code for the men's bathroom, so I actually had to go to the women's room while someone stood guard outside the bathroom," Peters says. "I knew at that moment that I was a bit of a unicorn."

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Education
3:31 am
Wed September 3, 2014

Some Accused Of Sexual Assault On Campus Say System Works Against Them

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed September 3, 2014 1:12 pm

After years of criticism for being too lax on campus sexual assault, some colleges and universities are coming under fire from students who say the current crackdown on perpetrators has gone too far.

Dozens of students who've been punished for sexual assault are suing their schools, saying that they didn't get a fair hearing and that their rights to due process were violated. The accused students say schools simply are overcorrecting.

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Education
5:11 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

Sounds From The First Day Of School

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 7:14 pm

The day after Labor Day is traditionally the end of summer break and the start of the school year. But for students in many parts of the country, the school year has already started.

Whether you're struggling to find your classroom or remember your locker combination, the first day is a big one for students, teachers and families.

With millions of children headed back to school, we asked reporters from member stations around the country to bring us the sounds of that first day:

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Education
3:34 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Kids And Screen Time: What Does The Research Say?

LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 3:46 pm

Kids are spending more time than ever in front of screens, and it may be inhibiting their ability to recognize emotions, according to new research out of the University of California, Los Angeles.

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Education
12:15 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

A Picture Of Language: The Fading Art Of Diagramming Sentences

The design firm Pop Chart Lab has taken the first lines of famous novels and diagrammed those sentences. This one shows the opening of Franz Kafka's Metamorphosis.
Pop Chart Lab

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 5:25 pm

When you think about a sentence, you usually think about words — not lines. But sentence diagramming brings geometry into grammar.

If you weren't taught to diagram a sentence, this might sound a little zany. But the practice has a long — and controversial — history in U.S. schools.

And while it was once commonplace, many people today don't even know what it is.

So let's start with the basics.

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Education
8:03 am
Sun August 17, 2014

Why The Atlanta Testing Scandal Matters

One study found that teachers under high-stakes testing spent more time teaching "bubble kids" who were close to passing, at the expense of students elsewhere on the bell curve.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Sun August 17, 2014 3:04 pm

Once, in a sauna at a Korean spa in Queens, I overheard what sounded like two teachers discussing the cheating practices of a third. "You know how she does it," one said. "She'll lean over a student about to put a wrong answer and whisper, 'Check your work.' "

"Yes, and her finger will just happen to be on the right answer," said the other one.

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Education
8:08 am
Mon August 11, 2014

When Applying For Federal Aid, 'Cross Your Fingers And Hope'

The FAFSA is a confusing ritual for college-bound students.
The Bent Tree/Flickr

Originally published on Mon August 11, 2014 11:02 am

Every year, more than 20 million students apply for federal financial aid to help pay for college. Five years ago, Mandy Stango was one of them.

To get there, though, Stango felt confused and woefully unprepared. That confusion started with the very first step in the process, as she and her family had to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The FAFSA.

"I sat there, I read the directions, and crossed my fingers and hoped I was doing the right thing," says Stango, who's now 23.

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Education
5:07 pm
Sun August 10, 2014

Need To Evade Would-Be Captors? There's A Class For That

Reporter Jeff Tyler, before being shut into the trunk of a car. Picking a handcuff lock with a barrette was one of several escape skills he picked up at a two-day Spy Escape & Evasion course in California.
Courtesy of Jason Hanson

Originally published on Sun August 10, 2014 5:41 pm

Terrorism and conflict can be good for business — if your business is teaching people to avoid kidnapping and escape from captors.

Americans are spending lots of money on a burgeoning evasion and survival industry, in classes that teach people to free themselves from handcuffs with a barrette and prepare for worst-case scenarios.

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Education
8:03 am
Thu August 7, 2014

Tests That Look Like Video Games

A screenshot from the Posterlet game: choosing negative or positive feedback.
AAA Lab, Stanford University

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 11:21 am

This week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

Imagine you're playing a computer game that asks you to design a poster for the school fair. You're fiddling with fonts, changing background colors and deciding what activity to feature: Will a basketball toss appeal to more people than a pie bake-off?

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Education
7:03 am
Thu August 7, 2014

What A Balloon Shouldn't Do, But For Some Reason Does

SmarterEveryDay YouTube

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Education
3:26 am
Thu August 7, 2014

California Experiments With Fast-Tracking Medical School

First-year medical student Ngabo Nzigira gets ready to see a patient at Kaiser Permanente in Sacramento.
Andrew Nixon Capital Public Radio

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 4:46 pm

Some doctors in the state of California will soon be able to practice after three years of medical school instead of the traditional four. The American Medical Association is providing seed money for the effort in the form of a $1 million, five-year grant to the University of California at Davis.

Student Ngabo Nzigira is in his sixth week of medical school and he's already interacting with patients during training with a doctor at Kaiser Permanente in Sacramento.

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Education
3:24 am
Thu August 7, 2014

Rich Kid, Poor Kid: For 30 Years, Baltimore Study Tracked Who Gets Ahead

A rooftop view of East Baltimore, 1979.
Elinor Cahn Courtesy of Elinor Cahn Photographs, The Photography Collections, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Originally published on Sun August 10, 2014 6:21 pm

Education is historically considered to be the thing that levels the playing field, capable of lifting up the less advantaged and improving their chances for success.

"Play by the rules, work hard, apply yourself and do well in school, and that will open doors for you," is how Karl Alexander, a Johns Hopkins University sociologist, puts it.

But a study published in June suggests that the things that really make the difference — between prison and college, success and failure, sometimes even life and death — are money and family.

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Education
3:43 am
Wed August 6, 2014

Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 6:40 pm

This week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

When it comes to brain development, time in the classroom may be less important than time on the playground.

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Education
3:42 am
Tue August 5, 2014

When Kids Start Playing To Win

Peri Schiavone, 13, gets some quick notes from her swim coach, Raj Verma, before hopping back into the pool at the Fairfax County YMCA in Reston, Va.
Sarah Tilotta NPR

Originally published on Tue August 5, 2014 10:47 am

This week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

It's a playful word that's developed something of a bad reputation: "competition." The fear among some parents is that, once children start playing to win, at around 5 years old, losing isn't just hard. It's devastating.

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Education
6:52 pm
Sun August 3, 2014

Amid Rising College Costs, A Defense Of The Liberal Arts

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon August 4, 2014 9:18 am

The price of a college education is soaring in America; so is the amount of student loan debt. President Obama has proposed regulations that would cap student loan payments at 10 percent of a graduate's income, and according to the latest Labor Department data, about a third of recent college graduates are either underemployed or jobless.

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Education
8:53 am
Thu July 31, 2014

Enlisting Smartphones In The Campaign For Campus Safety

Circle of 6 was born out of the 2011 "Apps Against Abuse" challenge, a partnership between the Office of the Vice President, Department of Health and Human Services and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Originally published on Thu July 31, 2014 9:00 am

Technology – and particularly smartphones – could reshape safety efforts on college campuses. At least that's the hope of some developers.

Several new apps offer quick ways for college students facing unsafe or uncomfortable situations to reach out to their peers, connect with resources on campus and in their communities, or notify law enforcement.

These apps for the most part target sexual assault and rape, amid growing national concern about the prevalence of incidents and criticism of the ways colleges and universities are handling them.

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Education
11:34 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Q&A: How Is The Native College Experience Different?

Adrienne Keene, author of the popular blog "Native Appropriations"
Patricia Saxler Courtesy Adrienne Keene

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 2:05 pm

Adrienne Keene is a post-doctoral researcher at Brown University, the author of the popular blog "Native Appropriations" and a member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.

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Education
9:08 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Learning To Read May Take Longer Than We Thought

Most of what we know — or think we know — about how kids learn comes from classroom practice and behavioral psychology. Now, neuroscientists are adding to and qualifying that store of knowledge by studying the brain itself. The latest example: new research in the journal Developmental Science suggests a famous phenomenon known as the "fourth-grade shift" isn't so clear-cut.

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Education
1:07 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Saving Lives In South Miami, One Pool At A Time

Gary Kendrick, 8, works on his freestyle stroke with help from a counselor at Ransom Everglades School. Kendrick did not know how to swim before he started lessons at the school.
Wilson Sayre WLRN

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 1:52 pm

It's hot out. The usual midday thunderstorm has just passed, and the few kids hanging out on bleachers around the pool at Miami's Ransom Everglades School finally get the go-ahead to jump in and cool off.

Eight-year-old Gary Kendrick and the others are all here for swim lessons.

"They told us to hold on to the wall and kick our feet and, like, move our arms," Kendrick says. "When I had to swim to one of the counselors, I was really swimming. I ain't even know I was moving."

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Education
3:17 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

This Aspiring Astronaut Might Be The World's Most Amazing Teen

It took 101 takes to get the right shot for Gideon Gidori's Kickstarter video. He hopes supporters will fund his flight school tuition in exchange for a secret potato salad recipe.
via Kickstarter

Originally published on Thu July 31, 2014 3:50 pm

At age 7, Gideon Gidori knew exactly what he wanted to be: a rocket ship pilot.

The only thing was, he was living in a tiny Tanzanian village where his school only went through grade six and books about space (or, for that matter, any books) were scarce.

But that didn't stop him. Now 15, Gidori is determined to become Tanzania's very first astronaut.

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