Food

Food
7:26 am
Sun March 29, 2015

Cheez Whiz Helped Spread Processed Foods. Will It Be Squeezed Out?

A Cheez Whiz ad from 1952.
Courtesy of Kraft Foods

Originally published on Sun March 29, 2015 10:33 am

Will Cheez Whiz survive the merger?

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Food
3:32 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Is Colorado Primed To Become The Silicon Valley Of Agriculture?

A drone built by Agribotix, a Boulder startup, flies over a farm in Weld County, Colo. The drone has a camera that snaps a high-resolution photo every two seconds. From there, Agribotix stitches the images together, helping the farmer see what's happening in a field.
Luke Runyon Harvest Public Media/KUNC

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 8:31 am

Colorado is famous for its beer and its beef. But what about its farm drones?

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Food
11:22 am
Thu March 26, 2015

How Snobbery Helped Take The Spice Out Of European Cooking

A 16th century woodcut shows the interior of a kitchen. In medieval Europe, cooks combined contrasting flavors and spices in much the same way that Indian cooking still does today.
Paul Lacroix Wikimedia

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 11:57 am

My father usually starts off his curries by roasting a blend of cinnamon, cardamom, coriander, anise, cumin and bay leaves. Then he incorporates the onions, garlic and ginger — and then tomatoes and chilies and a touch of cream.

The North Indian cuisine I grew up eating is about melding together distinct, disparate flavors and building up layer upon layer of spice and seasoning. Much of European cuisine, by contrast, is about combining complementary flavors — think potatoes with leeks, or scallops with white wine.

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Food
1:29 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Meet The Cool Beans Designed To Beat Climate Change

These beans, grown on test plots at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture in Colombia, can thrive in temperatures that cripple most conventional beans.
Courtesy of CIAT/Neil Palmer

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 5:16 pm

A planet that is warming at extraordinary speed may require extraordinary new food crops. The latest great agricultural hope is beans that can thrive in temperatures that cripple most conventional beans. They're now growing in test plots of the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, or CIAT, in Colombia.

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Food
4:27 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Even Neil DeGrasse Tyson Is Now Munching On Bugs

Neil deGrasse Tyson with a Cambodian cricket rumaki canape, wrapped in bacon. "I have come to surmise, in the culinary universe, that anytime someone feels compelled to wrap something in bacon, it probably doesn't taste very good," he said skeptically before taking a bite.
Carole Zimmer for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 5:03 pm

More than 1,000 guests in gowns and tuxedos crowded into a two-story hall on Saturday night at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

Standing among a pack of well-preserved African elephants, they sampled the delicacies offered by waiters wending their way through the throngs. They had come for the annual dinner of the Explorers Club — and the cocktail-hour fare certainly required an adventurous palate: All of it was made of insects.

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Weeknight Kitchen
7:47 am
Fri March 20, 2015

Weeknight Kitchen: Lamb & Pistachio Patties

Makes about 10
 
Based on the Turkish fistikli kebap, this is my quick-and-easy version of the classic recipe. I add a few extra ingredients that work well with the pistachios. In the absence of a barbecue or flame grill, I like to shape the mixture into patties, which are easy to cook in a frying pan, but you can shape it into meatballs, larger patties or elongated kebabs if preferred. Serve this dish with Cacik or yogurt.
 
· 150g (5oz) shelled pistachio nuts
· 2 large free-range eggs
· 500g (1lb 2oz) minced lamb

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Food
11:50 pm
Sat March 14, 2015

The Family Peach Farm That Became A Symbol Of The Food Revolution

Mas Masumoto grew up on his family farm southeast of Fresno, Calif. His 1987 essay "Epitaph for A Peach," in which he bemoaned the loss of heirloom flavors, captured his changing philosophy as a farmer. It also helped turn his farm into a landmark in the local-food movement.
Dan Charles/NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 1:50 pm

In the heart of California's Central Valley, a vast expanse of orchards, vineyards, and vegetable fields, lies a small collection of aging peach trees. Farmer Mas Masumoto's decision to preserve those trees, and then to write about it, became a symbol of resistance to machine-driven food production.

Yet the Masumoto farm's story isn't just one of saving peaches. It's become a father-daughter saga of claiming, abandoning, and then re-claiming a piece of America's agricultural heritage.

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Food
11:38 am
Fri March 13, 2015

Making Pies For Pi Day: Think Inside The Circle

Claire O'Neill/NPR

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 6:03 pm

Editor's note: A version of this story was published in March 2011.

Get ready to roll out some dough, because it's almost Pi Day.

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Food
7:03 am
Fri March 13, 2015

Behold! The Cosmos Created From The Contents Of A Kitchen

Planet: bottom of a glass containing half and half, water, food coloring. Moons: bottom of a glass containing coconut milk, water, food coloring. Stars: salt, cinnamon, baking powder, Tums.
Navid Baraty

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 12:13 pm

Surely, you've heard of making food in space. Astronauts have to eat, right?

But perhaps you hadn't considered making space out of food. Navid Baraty, a freelance photographer in Brooklyn and Los Angeles, arranges common pantry items to create strikingly accurate-looking photos of an imaginary cosmos.

"I'm a really big space geek," Baraty tells The Salt. "I'll look at NASA images or Hubble images to see how things were placed in the sky, and I try to make things as realistic as possible."

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Food
11:08 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Does Being Vegan Really Help Animals?

Mark Hammon iStockphoto

More people are moving toward a plant-based diet, owing in part to evidence about human health and environmental sustainability, and in part to the emerging scientific consensus on the breadth and depth of animal consciousness and sentience.

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Weeknight Kitchen
2:03 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Weeknight Kitchen: Grilled Salmon with Horseradish and Pickled Beet Sauce (Lachs)

Serves 4
 
The combination of pickled beets and horseradish is common in eastern Europe, and its popularity has been co-opted by German cooks, who have long used both elements in the kitchen. If possible, use homemade pickled beets to create the robustly flavored topping for this simple salmon dinner.
 
· 1 cup/155 g sliced pickled beets, homemade (recipe follows) or store-bought, roughly chopped
· 3 tbsp freshly grated horseradish or prepared horseradish
· 2 tbsp finely chopped fresh curly-leaf parsley
· Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon

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Food
10:51 am
Thu March 5, 2015

We're Not Taking Enough Lunch Breaks. Why That's Bad For Business

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 2:17 pm

Did you take a lunch break yesterday? Are you planning to take one today?

Chances are the answer is no. Fewer American workers are taking time for lunch. Research shows that only 1 in 5 five people steps away for a midday meal. Most workers are simply eating at their desks.

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Food
3:38 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Stone Age Britons Were Eating Wheat 2,000 Years Before They Farmed It

A field of unharvested wheat is seen in Ashby-de-la-Zouch, England, in 2012. Wheat wasn't cultivated in Britain until some 6,000 years ago, but DNA evidence suggests early Britons were eating the grain at least 8,000 years ago.
Darren Staples Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 10:45 am

Scientists have learned a lot about our distant ancestors from DNA that's thousands of years old. Like the fact that we've inherited some Neanderthal DNA, so apparently our ancestors mated with them. Now there's new research from DNA that moves on from paleo-mating to paleo-eating.

About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers in the Near East figured out how to grow cereal crops like wheat. The farming culture spread, and wherever it went, people traded in their spears for plows.

That's the conventional view. Apparently, it was more complicated than that.

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Food
5:18 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

Lamb Dumplings, Lentils And A Bittersweet Taste Of Home

Traditional desserts, like these served in 2010 at the original Naranj restaurant in Damascus, offer sweet, familiar flavors at the restaurant's various locations in the Middle East. A platter like this shows up at the end of every meal at Naranj, and all the pastries are made in-house.
Jan Smith Flickr

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 7:22 pm

For people living in a new country, a taste of home can be a powerful emotional experience.

All the more so when you've left your country because of war.

Iraq has taken in about a quarter-million people fleeing Syria's civil war. In the northern Iraqi city of Irbil, one of Syria's most famous restaurants is re-creating the tastes of Damascus.

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Food
5:41 am
Sun February 22, 2015

Visual Feast: If The World's Major Cities Were Made Of Food

BrunchCity's take on Morocco: The markets of Marrakech are cooled by an oasis of the country's famous mint tea.
Courtesy of Bea Crespo and Andrea G.Portoles

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 4:42 pm

In America, the word "brunch" conjures up visions of eggs benedict and bagels and lox. But, broadly speaking, "brunch" — as a word and a concept — is a literal blend of breakfast and lunch. And around the world, there's a wide variety of culinary delights that people choose to graze on between late morning and midafternoon.

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Food
12:21 pm
Fri February 20, 2015

Why Some States Want To Legalize Raw Milk Sales

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cautions that unpasteurized milk can cause serious illness, because it's a fertile breeding ground for harmful germs like salmonella and E. coli. But such warnings haven't deterred raw milk enthusiasts.
Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 2:20 pm

The federal government banned the sale of raw milk across state lines nearly three decades ago because it poses a threat to public health. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Medical Association all strongly advise people not to drink it.

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Weeknight Kitchen
1:38 pm
Wed February 18, 2015

Weeknight Kitchen: Salmon Cakes

Makes 6 servings
 
Canned salmon is a great way to get in your weekly dose of fatty fish without breaking your budget. Bonus: Canned salmon is an awesome pantry staple. This recipe makes a great dinner for when you don’t know what to make—just head to the pantry, snag a few cans of salmon, and dinner is almost done!
 
· 2 tablespoons butter
· 1 small red onion, diced
· 4 stalks celery, diced
· 1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced
· 2 (14-ounce) cans salmon, drained
· 1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
· 2 tablespoons capers

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Food
11:36 am
Tue February 17, 2015

Fat Tuesday Nordic-Style Means Big, Sweet Buns

Semlor served at FIKA in New York City. "The interest [in semlor] is huge," says Lena Khoury, the Swedish cafe chain's director of strategy and communications.
Courtesy of FIKA

Originally published on Wed February 18, 2015 12:22 pm

Forget the all-night boozing, the spicy jambalaya and the gaudy-colored king cake. And definitely forget the scantily clad debauchery that is Mardi Gras.

Like the setup of a Garrison Keillor joke, I'm here to tell you about Lutherans and their sweet February buns. Welcome to Fat Tuesday, Nordic-style.

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Food
11:59 am
Fri February 13, 2015

Your Brain May Want That Bottle Of Soda Because It's Easy To Pick Up

You want that soda bottle. But it may not be because you crave soda. It might just be that you love the idea of wrapping your fingers around its enticing shape.
Ariel Zambelich NPR

Originally published on Fri February 13, 2015 12:41 pm

Here at Goats and Soda, we can't resist a good story about goats. (See our story about how you know if your goat is happy.) The same goes for soda.

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Food
2:35 pm
Thu February 12, 2015

Gardener's Twofer: First Ketchup 'N' Fries Plant Hits U.S. Market

The plant is an early tomato grafted to a late-producing potato. The two can be harvested throughout the season.
SuperNaturals

Originally published on Tue February 17, 2015 6:35 pm

Love growing potatoes and tomatoes? This spring, gardeners in the U.S. (and Europe) will be able to get both tuber and fruit from a single plant.

It even has a catchy name: Ketchup 'n' Fries.

"It's like a science project," says Alice Doyle of SuperNaturals Grafted Vegetables, the company that's licensing the variety for U.S. markets from the U.K. company that developed it. "It's something that is really bizarre, but it's going to be fun [for gardeners] to measure and see how it grows."

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