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Food

Food

Even though Marca Engman read countless books, watched YouTube videos and took a beekeeping class before installing her first hive in 2012, she knew she'd need help in the field.

"The whole idea of beekeeping was overwhelming," she recalls. "Every year is different and every hive is different."

Rather than working a backyard beehive solo, Engman installed her first hive in the community apiary at Hudson Gardens, a nonprofit garden near Littleton, Colo.

Eating well has many known benefits. But a good diet may not be able to counteract all the ill effects of stress on our bodies.

A new study, published in Molecular Psychiatry, suggests stress can override the benefits of making better food choices.

I fell for pho in Saigon in 1974, when I was 5 years old. When my family came to America in 1975, my mom satisfied our family's cravings for the aromatic beef noodle soup with homemade batches, served on Sundays after morning Mass. As Vietnamese expatriates, we savored pho as a very special food, a gateway to our cultural roots. When we didn't have pho at home, we went out for it in Orange County, California's Little Saigon, patronizing mom-and-pop shops that welcomed us with the perfume of pho broth.

For some, there's a a glam factor attached to the vegan lifestyle. And these days, there seems to be a growing chorus singing the praises of the environmental and health benefits of a plant-centric diet.

Serves 2 

Ingredients

• 2 Tbsp vegetable oil 
• 1 onion, diced
• 1 garlic clove, minced 
• 1 bunch kale, ribs removed, chopped
• Kosher salt
• 1 cup [170 g] quinoa, rinsed
• 2 cups [480 ml] vegetable broth
• 2 tsp gochujang 
• 1 Tbsp soy sauce, plus more as needed
• 1 tsp sesame oil
• 2 eggs
• 3/4 cup [150 g] kimchi, chopped, plus more as needed
• 1 green onion, white and green parts, thinly sliced 

Directions

Writer, actor and longtime NPR contributor Vertamae Smart-Grosvenor died Saturday at age 79.

Smart-Grosvenor contributed hundreds of commentaries to NPR between 1980 and 2013. She was famed for her culinary explorations and travels, including a 1983 visit to a place she loved: Daufuskie Island, S.C. In a 1983 special report for NPR, she described her feelings about the trip:

In Seattle, blackberries are as much a part of the view as the Puget Sound — the twisting brambles so ubiquitous, they're as likely to vex gardeners as delight them.

The tale behind the city's blackberries turns out to be equally tangled. It starts at the end of the 19th century, at a time when American life was changing dramatically.

People were moving from rural areas to towns and cities, including Seattle. Industrialization was creating a new middle class.

You've likely heard that dark chocolate is good for you.

Last year, researchers linked a regular chocolate habit to a reduced risk of heart disease.

And, as we've reported, compounds found in cocoa known as flavanols or polyphenols have been shown to improve vascular health by increasing blood flow.

Trust the Italians to meet disaster with food.

While nobody is making light of Wednesday's earthquake that struck Amatrice, a small town in the Appenine mountains about 70 miles as the crow flies from Rome, several independent efforts have sprung up to use the town's signature dish — spaghetti all' amatriciana — to help relief efforts.

Nestled among rolling hills and grazing cows, Elmore Mountain Bread in central Vermont is quintessentially pastoral. The setting is apropos, given the owners' recent decision to start grinding their own flour by stone — a veritable step back in time.

In 1977, Deborah Barsel, a bored assistant registrar at the George Eastman Museum in Rochester, N.Y., decided to try a fun side project. She would create a cookbook made up of recipes and images from famous photographers of the day. She sent letters to various artists and put an ad in the museum's magazine asking for submissions. In return, she received 120 photos, recipes and even a postcard from urban photographer John Gossage saying simply: "I eat out."

You've heard of the San Francisco gold rush. But that rush spurred another, lesser-known event: the egg rush. The legions of miners who swept into the region in the 1850s hoping to strike gold all had to be fed. And they needed protein to stay strong. But when food shortages hit, wily entrepreneurs looked for eggs in an unlikely source: the Farallon Islands.

Now, you can love your seafood and eat it, too. But first, you'll have to catch it. Fisherman Kirk Lombard's new book, The Sea Forager's Guide to the Northern California Coast, teaches the art, science, ethics and wisdom of fishing for your next meal in the ocean. Through wit, poetry and anecdotes, Lombard makes the case that the sincerest stewards of wild sea creatures are often those who intend to have them for dinner.

Jonathan Garaas has learned a few things in three seasons of backyard beekeeping: Bees are fascinating. They're complicated. And keeping them alive is not easy.

Every two weeks, the Fargo, N.D., attorney opens the hives to check the bees and search for varroa mites, pests that suck the bees' blood and can transmit disease. If he sees too many of the pinhead-sized parasites, he applies a chemical treatment.

Serves 6 

Ingredients

For the sauce 

• 3 tablespoons Thai sweet chili sauce 
• 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce
• 3 tablespoons light soy sauce 
• 2 tablespoons Sriracha
• 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
• 1 teaspoon sesame oil
• 1 1⁄2 tablespoons unseasoned rice vinegar
• 2 tablespoons minced garlic (about 4 cloves) 
• 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger 

For the filling

Lisbon is a city of plazas, parks, overlooks and gardens. For more than a century, these beautiful public spaces were graced by Art Noveau and Moorish-style kiosks — small, ornate structures that provided chairs and shade and served traditional Portuguese snacks and drinks.

Weeknight Kitchen: Wasabi Steak

Jul 22, 2016

Serves 4 

Ingredients

• 2 tablespoons mirin
• 2 tablespoons soy sauce
• 1 teaspoon brown sugar
• 1 teaspoon sesame oil
• 400 g (14 oz) sirloin or rump steak, cut into 1–2cm (1/2 - 3/4 inch) slices
• 1 tablespoon rapeseed oil
• 150 g (5 1/2 oz) watercress or pea shoots
• 200 g (7 oz) asparagus, shaved
• 150 g (5 1/2 oz) cooked edamame beans
• A bunch of spring onions, cut into strips
• 1 tablespoon black sesame seeds
• 1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Dressing

Weeknight Kitchen: Wasabi Steak

Jul 22, 2016

Serves 4 

Ingredients

• 2 tablespoons mirin
• 2 tablespoons soy sauce
• 1 teaspoon brown sugar
• 1 teaspoon sesame oil
• 400 g (14 oz) sirloin or rump steak, cut into 1–2cm (1/2 - 3/4 inch) slices
• 1 tablespoon rapeseed oil
• 150 g (5 1/2 oz) watercress or pea shoots
• 200 g (7 oz) asparagus, shaved
• 150 g (5 1/2 oz) cooked edamame beans
• A bunch of spring onions, cut into strips
• 1 tablespoon black sesame seeds
• 1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Dressing

You probably know Neil deGrasse Tyson as an astrophysicist with a seemingly endless stream of science fun facts at his command. You might not be aware that he is also a great oenophile and lover of food.

Some 16 years ago, before I was a journalist and illustrator, I worked with Neil at the American Museum of Natural History. He would sometimes carry around a small canvas tote bag. As I recall, the bag would contain one of two things: either a weighty, mango-sized meteorite to show to guests of the museum, or a bottle of wine to gift to a colleague.

QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About War And Food?

Jul 19, 2016

When we think of tools of warfare, we tend to think of spears, guns and other types of militaristic weaponry. But throughout history, food has often been a critical component of war — inspiring conflict and, in some cases, delivering victory. War and peace? More like war and peas.

We've created a quiz to test your knowledge of just a few examples of how the history of food and war are intermingled. Can you defeat the questions?

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