Food

Food
1:53 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Sandwich Monday: PB&J Fries

Peter failed to hitch this to the back of his motorcycle and bring it back to Chicago for us.
NPR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 3:55 pm

Canadians have given us so much, from the BlackBerry, a kind of phone your parents' older friends used to use, to Leslie Hope, the lady who played Kiefer Sutherland's wife in Season 1 of 24. But perhaps towering above all is poutine, which translated from the Quebecois is "stuff poured onto french fries." Usually it's some variation of cheese, meat and gravy, but I was told that in Portland, Ore. (naturally), at a food truck (naturally), you can get peanut butter and jelly on fries. So I went, naturally.

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Food
1:28 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Kitchens Of The Future Will Really Know How To Cook

A woman checks out a smart refrigerator at a consumer electronics show in 2012.
Samsung USA

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:35 pm

Kitchens are getting smarter.

Some refrigerators can let you know when the door is open, or if the milk is past its sell-by date. They make ice at night during less expensive, off-peak energy hours. There are dishwashers that can contact a repairman.

It probably won't be long before you can become Facebook friends with your microwave.

The first microwave oven — the Radarange — weighed 750 pounds and was bought by a Cleveland restaurant in 1947 for $3,000. Later home models had a pull-out box for recipe cards. Paper recipe cards. So quaint.

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Food
2:57 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Demystifying Saffron: Mark Bittman Explains The Pricey Spice

Marilyn Barbone iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:25 pm

In the latest installment of NPR's Cook Your Cupboard, New York Times columnist and cookbook author Mark Bittman sheds a little light on saffron — a spice that has been stumping Lennet Radke in Wisconsin. Radke, who received a little jar in a contest, says she's never really used it. The stuff isn't cheap. And that knowledge alone can stifle experimentation.

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Food
2:52 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Why This Year's Blueberry Bounty Has Growers Feeling Blue

Picker Erika Nicolas Garcia, 18, fills her pail at a blueberry farm near Hillsboro, Ore.
Anna King Northwest Public Radio

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:52 am

The blueberries on your morning cereal are less expensive this year. That's because farmers are harvesting a bumper crop this summer. It's good news for berry lovers, but the bounty might wreck some blueberry growers.

In Richland, Wash., Genoa Blankenship pops open the lid on a box of blueberries. Her three young children struggle to stop wiggling. Blankenship loves the idea of healthy snacks that are easy to take along to soccer practice.

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Weeknight Kitchen
2:24 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Weeknight Kitchen: Gill's Spinach, Chorizo & Halloumi Salad

Actually, this was created by Gill's friend Jane, but it comes to us via Gill, so we're putting her name on it. It's a salad that uses up the kinds of things you find in the refrigerator during the summer.

4 large handfuls of baby spinach leaves, washed
8 oz Halloumi cheese, cut into 4 pieces
2 fat cloves of garlic, crushed
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for tossing and drizzling
24 spears of fresh asparagus, trimmed
5 oz chorizo, thinly slice
1/4 cup balsamic syrup salt and freshly ground black pepper

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Food
12:42 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

How A Seed Saver Discovered One Of Our Favorite Tomatoes

A Cherokee purple tomato grown in Alaska in 2011.
Sherry Shiesl Tatiana's TOMATObase

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 3:04 pm

Fortunately for those of us who are suckers for novelty, every year fruits and vegetables seem to come in more bewitching colors, shapes and flavors. Lately, we've been tickled by the cotton candy grape and the vibrant orange Turkish eggplant.

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Splendid Table
11:41 am
Wed August 14, 2013

The Splendid Table, August 31, 2013 @ 2pm

Coming up next time on the Splendid Table, we take a look at our relationship with hunting this week with Chef Jesse Griffiths author of Afield, A Chef's Guidee to Preparing and Cooking Wild Game and fish. Southern chef Bill Smith of Crook's Corner in Chapel Hill joins us for our next installment of The Key 3, the Stern's are at The Polish Villa in Buffalo, NY and we take a look at an unusual find in the wine world, orange wine. That's this week on the Splendid Table, Saturday afternoon at 2pm on 90.5 FM!

Splendid Table
11:33 am
Wed August 14, 2013

The Splendid Table, August 24th, 2013 @ 2pm

Nex time on the Splendid Table, William Sitwell, author of a History of Food in 100 Recipes joins us, we look at the Indian tradition of chutneys with chef Vikas Khanna and check in with film director Wayne Wang about his latest project, a documentary on the life of legendary Chinese restaurateur Cecilia Chiang. That's coming up on the Splendid Table, Saturday afternoon at 2pm, right here on WCBE.

Splendid Table
11:25 am
Wed August 14, 2013

The Splendid Table, August 17th, 2013 @ 2pm

On the next edition of the Splendid Table, novelist Jay McInerney joins with his newest wine book. The Juice, Vinous Veritas, Tracie McMillan author of The American Way of Eating has gone undercover in the American food industry and we look at the vegetarian traditionsin Morocco with Jeff Koehler author of Morocco: A Culinary Journey with Recipes from the Spice- Scented Marketes of Marrakech to the Date-Filled Oasis of Zagora. Listen for the Splendid Table, each Saturday afternoon at 2pm, on 90.5 FM!

Food
11:13 am
Wed August 14, 2013

In Maine, Lobster Comes Out Of Its Shell

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:44 pm

You might think a great benefit of living in Maine is unlimited access to fresh, cheap lobster. Most Mainers, however, probably eat less lobster in a year than tourists here consume in a week. Lobster bakes and boiling lobsters in those tall, speckled pots are grudgingly reserved for when company comes.

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Food
3:02 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Colorado Vault Is Fort Knox For The World's Seeds

Dave Dierig, research leader at the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation, stands among the ceiling-high shelves that hold the 600,000 seed packets in this cold storage vault.
Grace Hood KUNC

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

When unapproved genetically modified wheat was found growing in Oregon earlier this year, it didn't take long for accusations to start flying. A flurry of initial finger-pointing cast potential blame on a federal seed vault in Fort Collins, Colo., which housed the same strain of wheat, developed by Monsanto Corp., for about seven years up until late 2011.

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Food
3:05 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Old Hawaiian Menus Tell Story Of Local Fish And Their Demise

Colorful covers of menus from the Royal Hawaiian Hotel (left) and the Monarch Room Royal Hawaiian Hotel.
New York Public Library

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:53 pm

In the early to mid-1900s, the islands of Hawaii were a far-away, exotic destination. People who managed to get there often kept mementos of that journey including kitschy menus from Hawaiian fine dining restaurants and hotels like like Trader Vic's and Prince Kuhio's.

Now these old menus are serving a purpose beyond colorful relics from the past. Kyle Van Houtan, an ecologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, says he's found a scientific purpose for the menus.

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Food
12:37 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Pot Liquor: A Southern Tip To Save Nutritious Broth From Greens

Instead of throwing out the nutritious broth that's left over when you cook down greens, why not use it as the base for a delicious dish like this rockfish with clams in a garlic-shallot pot liquor sauce?
Alison Aubrey NPR

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 4:07 pm

We don't have to tell you about the growing popularity of greens. From kale to collards to turnips, we've learned to embrace their nutrient-packed bitterness.

So here's a tip: When you're cooking up a big pot of greens, don't toss out what may be the most nutritious part — the brothy water that's left in the pot.

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Food
12:06 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Weeknight Kitchen: Red Rice Salad with Cherry Tomatoes, Cucumbers and Corn

If you haven't tried some of the heartier varieties of rice that can be picked up these days, this week's recipe for Red Rice Salad with Cherry Tomatoes, Cucumber and Corn is a good place to start.

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Food
12:25 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

The Cotton Candy Grape: A Sweet Spin On Designer Fruit

The Cotton Candy grape looks and smells like a regular green grape. But the taste will evoke memories of the circus.
Courtesy of Spencer Gray

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 1:48 pm

Can't we just leave our fruit alone?

Last year, apple farmers were soaking their fruit in grape flavor to make them more attractive to kids. Now, plant breeders in California have created a grape that tastes like — well, spun sugar and air.

That's right, Salties. Say hello to the Cotton Candy grape.

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Food
2:04 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Chili Cheeseburger A-Plenty

As you approach the Beacon in Spartanburg, S.C., you see the lighthouse, which is the only light thing you're going to encounter for the next half-hour or so.
NPR

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 2:44 pm

There are, for eaters of sandwiches, pilgrimages that must be made. In fact, the pilgrims who came over on the Mayflower were on a pilgrimage to try the first day-after-Thanksgiving leftover turkey sandwich. After that, the next most important pilgrimage may be to the Beacon Drive-In Restaurant in Spartanburg, S.C.

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Food
7:33 am
Sat August 3, 2013

Bringing Home The Woolly Bacon From Hungary

A Mangalitsa pig in 2008.
Li'l Wolf/Flickr

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 10:30 am

On a cold February evening in Budapest a few years ago, I was invited to go to a small festival on the edge of the city's main park. There, I was told, I would eat pig.

This was not unusual: In Hungary, the word for barbecue, szalonnasütés, means bacon cooking, whereby a piece of bacon is held over an open fire as the fat drips onto an awaiting slice of bread.

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Food
10:12 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Weeknight Kitchen: Grilled Broccoli Rabe and Arugula Salad

So many people miss out on broccoli rabe because they don't know what to do with it. Pure transformation happens when you grill any vegetable with an edge of bitterness to it, but broccoli rabe (a.k.a. rab, rappini, and others) can really take on a new life on the grill.

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Food
10:32 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Buttermilk Makes Everything Taste A Little Better

T. Susan Chang for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:55 pm

It started happening about 15 years ago. I'd be paging through a new cookbook or browsing through recipes online, and I'd suddenly stop. "Mmm, buttermilk biscuits. Doesn't that sound good?" I'd bookmark the site or dog-ear the page. The next week I'd see a recipe for waffles — buttermilk waffles, as it happened. What a splendid idea. Out came the yellow stickies.

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Food
12:05 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Farm To Fido: Dog Food Goes Local

Producers of farm-to-dog-bowl food say the concept is more about locavorism and sustainability than about pampering pooches.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 9:53 am

The email read: "We signed a contract for farm-to-bowl dog food product development today, I kid you not :)"

The note was from a friend, Wendy Stuart, who consults on food access and sustainability issues. Even so, our first reaction was: Really?

It's easy to dismiss the concept as the culinary equivalent of a diamond dog collar or a Versace pet bowl.

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