Food

Food
9:38 am
Mon July 29, 2013

A New App Will Let You Share Your Leftovers With Strangers

Leftover Swap will let you share your unfinished meals with strangers.
Laura Mundee Flickr

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 11:42 am

Startups have made it so much easier for peer-to-peer buying and bartering these days. Need a place to stay? Swap houses. Want to fill out your wardrobe? Swap clothing. And coming soon is Leftover Swap, a smartphone app to help you barter or give away your leftovers.

This is either ingenious or cringe-worthy, depending on your penchant for other people's unfinished meals.

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Weeknight Kitchen
9:32 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Weeknight Kitchen: Angel Hair Pasta with Fennel and Spicy Tomatoes

Serves 4 or 6

The smaller fennel bulbs at our farmers markets tend to have a more pronounced licorice flavor that pairs nicely with the tang of good tomatoes.

2 tablespoons olive oil or vegetable oil
1 medium onion, chopped
1 large fennel bulb, chopped5 cloves garlic, minced2 teaspoons chopped thyme1 teaspoon fennel seeds, crushed
Generous pinch of crushed red pepper
1 cup dry white wine6 to 8 medium plum tomatoes, coarsely chopped, or one 28-ounce can diced tomatoes with their liquid
1 pound angel hair pasta

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Food
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Palm Oil In The Food Supply: What You Should Know

Much of the palm oil imported into the U.S. ends up in snack foods such as cookies, crackers and microwave popcorn.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 6:42 pm

Remember the battle over trans fats? Yeah, the fats that did our hearts no favors.

As we've reported, the push to get these cholesterol-raising fats out of the food supply has been pretty successful. And now most packaged snacks are labeled as having zero grams of trans fat.

So what are food manufacturers using instead? One alternative is palm oil. But it's not an ideal replacement.

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Food
1:56 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

On Hot Summer Days, Cook Your Fish Without Fire

Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 12:08 am

There are the summer days where we bake cobbler and pie, and grill up slabs of eggplant and bushels of corn. And then there are the tropically hot summer days where the thought of turning on an oven — or even an outdoor barbecue — is enough to make you want to flop your sweaty self across the bed (or, better yet, into a pool of cold water). On those dog days, you don't want your food warm from the grill — you want it dripping with cold.

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Food
1:02 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Chow Down In Sync With Your Circadian Clock

The time of day you eat really does make a difference when it comes to health outcomes.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 3:34 pm

We've already nudged you this week about the benefits of breakfast. And this got us thinking more about the timing of our meals.

There's a growing body of evidence to suggest that when we eat during a 24-hour cycle is likely more important for our health than we realized.

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Food
5:44 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Taco Bell Says Adios To Kids' Meals And Toys

Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 6:32 pm

That Crunchy Taco will no longer come with a side of toy.

Taco Bell announced Tuesday that it is ditching kids' meals and the trinkets that come with them at its U.S. locations. The items will begin to come off menus starting this month, the company says, and should be completely gone by January 2014.

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Food
3:00 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Why Skipping Breakfast Might Raise Risk Of Heart Disease

Skipping breakfast is risky.
iphoto

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:18 pm

Breakfast has long gotten a good rap for everything from aiding weight loss to improving focus in the classroom.

And ever since the Alameda County study in California back in the 1960s linked breakfast — along with a host of other habits — to a longer lifespan, there's been a societal push towards breaking the fast.

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Food
3:26 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Gravy Bread

They dropped the bread in the Meat Juice. On purpose.
NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 1:16 pm

You may be familiar with the Italian Beef, a Chicago roast beef sandwich you can get dipped, completely, in Meat Juice (or jus, if you insist on trying to be classy while dipping a sandwich in Meat Juice). Order "gravy bread," and you get nothing but the bun, soaked, completely, in Meat Juice.

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Food
4:46 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

These Pictures Might Tempt You To Eat Bugs

Gordon recommends dusting the deep-fried tarantula spider with smoked paprika.
Chugrad McAndrews Reprinted with permission from The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 10:18 am

Oh, Jiminy Cricket, you've never looked more scrumptious.

The grasshopper kabob is one of several enticing images of insect cuisine included in the new, revised edition of The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook, by avowed entomophagist (i.e., bug eater) David George Gordon.

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Food
9:15 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Baking A Little Invention Into Savory Cakes

Claire Adas for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 2:29 pm

I'm a mad scientist in the kitchen. My inventions for new culinary techniques that will revolutionize the way we eat usually happen in the middle of the night during a bout of insomnia. I stumble downstairs the next morning in a sleep-deprived daze, and a quick Internet search reveals that I'm far from the first person to have invented the cookery method, and hundreds of recipes already exist.

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Food
12:45 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Local Sake: America's Craft Brewers Look East For Inspiration

Yoed Anis, president of the Texas Sake Company, says "the only constraint holding us back" from faster growth is the absence of a sufficient and consistent rice supply.
Courtesy Texas Sake Company

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 1:29 pm

Most of us are familiar with that hot, musky-smelling, cloudy drink served in teacups at sushi bars and sometimes called, erroneously, "rice wine." In other words, most of us have had bad sake.

But finally, Americans are learning to love the good stuff.

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Food
5:18 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

The Secret To Georgian Grilled Meats? Grapevines And Lots Of Wine

Shashlik cooks on a hot grill. Kakheti, the easternmost province in the Republic of Georgia, is known for meats grilled over grapevines, which burn quickly, leaving a heap of finger-sized coals.
Nick Grabowski via Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 3:27 pm

Tucked between Russia and Turkey, the Republic of Georgia is renowned for great food: cheese dishes, pickles, breads and stews. This is a cuisine that you should not miss.

And on summer evenings in the capital, Tbilisi, the air is fragrant with the smells of one of Georgian cookery's highlights: grilled meat, or shashlik.

You can find good shashlik at restaurants with white tablecloths, but the very best in all Tbilisi is said to be at a roadside stop called Mtsvadi Tsalamze. It's an unassuming place with rows of wooden picnic tables in an open yard.

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Food
2:20 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Burger King Veggie Burger

You've got your work cut out for you here, mayonnaise.
NPR

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:24 pm

Burger King has made great reforms in the past few years, in case you haven't noticed. First, the election of its first Burger Prime Minister freed its citizens from the absolute monarchy that had ruled the restaurant for decades. Second, it created a veggie burger.

Eva: I wonder where they got the vegetarian pink slime.

Miles: I do have to hand it to Burger King, its food-shame substitute feels almost exactly like the real thing.

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Food
1:22 pm
Sat July 13, 2013

A Summery Spread That's As Cool As A Cucumber

Benedictine is a combination of cream cheese, cucumber and onion. It may sound odd, unless you're from Kentucky.
Erica Peterson WFPL

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 1:58 pm

Cream cheese, cucumber juice and a touch of onion. That may sound like an unlikely combination, but Benedictine is a Kentucky favorite. Gwynne Potts, a self-proclaimed aficionado, says it's delicious.

"The best thing to eat Benedictine on is just white bread," Potts says. "No special bread; it only takes away from the Benedictine."

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Food
4:04 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Taste Of Grandma's Kitchen: We Hack An Old Ketchup Recipe

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 3:23 pm

Editor's Note: This post is part of All Things Considered's Found Recipes project.

Although Heinz may dominate the ketchup scene, 100 years ago it wasn't uncommon to make your own at home. So why bother doing so now, when you can just buy the bottles off the shelf? At least one man, Jim Ledvinka, was motivated by nostalgia.

"Oh, yes — we remember my grandmother making ketchup. And it was quite a sight to behold," Ledvinka says.

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Food
10:14 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Hipsters Off The Hook: The Truth Behind Abandoned Backyard Chickens

Don't leave me: Many cities allow hens but not roosters.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 11:15 am

From the headlines this week, I almost expected to see a hen clucking outside NPR's headquarters this morning.

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Food
2:35 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

'Eating On The Wild Side:' A Field Guide To Nutritious Food

The cover of Eating on the Wild Side.
Little Brown and Company

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:17 am

We like to think that if we eat our recommended daily allowance of fruits and vegetables, we're doing right by our bodies. Think again, says health writer Jo Robinson.

In her new book, Eating on the Wild Side, Robinson argues that our prehistoric ancestors picked and gathered wild plants that were in many ways far more healthful than the stuff we buy today at farmers' markets.

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Food
11:15 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Scape Velocity: Green Garlic Takes Flight

T. Susan Chang for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 12:03 am

If you've never grown garlic, here's how you do it: On a bright cool fall afternoon, before the ground has frozen, you pry an ordinary, unpeeled clove of garlic off the bulb. You plant it in the ground, about 4 inches down and pointy side up. Maybe you cover the soil with some straw to protect it from extremes of heat, cold and drought.

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Food
12:12 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Why Micro-Gardening Could Go Big

Square Foot Gardening, makes it easy to grow 15 to 20 pounds of food in a small space with a plastic mat that serves as a garden planting guide." href="/post/why-micro-gardening-could-go-big" class="noexit lightbox">
The Nourishmat, which is inspired by Square Foot Gardening, makes it easy to grow 15 to 20 pounds of food in a small space with a plastic mat that serves as a garden planting guide.
Courtesy of Earth Starter

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 5:10 pm

Most urban consumers are happy to leave farming to the farmers, but for those with a green thumb, it is getting easier to garden in the city. That's thanks, in part, to DIYers sharing ideas for reusing old materials to garden in and a new range of tools designed to get many more people involved with growing some of their own food.

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Food
3:03 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The (Knockoff) Cronut

New York gave Chicago "the cronut," just as Chicago gave New York "Kanye West."
NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 4:13 pm

By now, you've probably heard of cronuts, the half-doughnut, half-croissant pastry equivalent of a liger. They're so coveted, people line up for hours at the Dominique Ansel bakery in New York, where they're made, or they pay exorbitant sums on the cronut black market.

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