Food

Food
9:24 am
Fri December 14, 2012

Sowing The Seeds For A Great American Chestnut Comeback

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 10:02 pm

Though we hear about them every holiday season in that famous song, chestnuts – whether roasting on an open fire or otherwise – have been noticeably absent from many American tables for decades, thanks to a deadly fungus that decimated the species near half a century ago. But a small army of determined growers have been on a seemingly quixotic quest to put chestnuts back on the American table, and they're just starting to see results.

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Food
3:33 pm
Thu December 13, 2012

Many Cups Of Tea: The Business Of Sipping In Western Sahara

A high-end tea set in a Saharawi home in Western Sahara.
Eliza Barclay NPR

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 5:16 pm

If you want to get anything done in Western Sahara, be prepared to drink tea β€” very, very sweet tea.

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Food
3:28 pm
Thu December 13, 2012

A Sweet Bread, A Wash Basin And A Shot Of Whiskey

Cookbook author Marilynn Brass says eating Virginia Lima's traditional Portuguese Sweet Bread is like biting into a cloud.
Andy Ryan

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 6:45 pm

For the holidays, why not give a gift that tastes like a cloud? Portuguese Sweet Bread may be as close as you can get, according to Marilynn Brass, one-half of the cookbook duo the Brass Sisters.

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Food
3:35 am
Thu December 13, 2012

Archaeologists Find Ancient Evidence Of Cheese-Making

Archaeologists believe that ancient farmers used pots made from these pottery shards to make cheese Ҁ” a less perishable, low-lactose milk product.
Nature

Originally published on Mon December 17, 2012 12:19 pm

As any cheese maker will tell you, it's not that hard to make cheese. You just take some fresh milk, warm it up a bit, and add something acidic to curdle it. Then, once it has cooled, you drain off the whey β€” the liquid part β€” and you're left with cheese.

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Food
4:10 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

Sandwich Monday: The Latke Double Down

A look within.
NPR

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 1:31 pm

We all remember the KFC Double Down: the sandwich that replaced bread with fried chicken and changed our lives for the fatter. Just in time for Hanukkah, the Jewish Journal has created the Latke Double Down, which replaces the bread with latkes, aka fried potato pancakes. They fill theirs with lox.

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Food
1:56 pm
Fri December 7, 2012

Mushroom Ice Cream, Anyone? Chefs Turning To Veggies For Dessert

A cup of pumpkin ice cream with chunks of frozen candy cap mushrooms. The candy cap variety is said to have the fragrance of maple syrup.
Jeff Moreau

Chefs at some of the most cutting edge restaurants in the country are incorporating vegetables into their desserts in ways that, at first glance, might not seem very dessert-y.

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Food
11:49 am
Fri December 7, 2012

When It Comes To Boxed Wine, The Cooler, The Better

If you're picking a boxed wine for your party this season, be aware that temperature is everything.
AFP Getty Images

Originally published on Fri December 7, 2012 1:22 pm

Bag-in-the-box wine doesn't have the classiest of reputations. It's usually cheap and in the past at least, has been aimed at less sophisticated consumers. But in recent years, boxed wine has tried to buck the stereotype, whether by gussying up the product packaging or simply putting higher-quality wine in the box.

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Food
1:55 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

Why Drinking Tea Was Once Considered A Dangerous Habit

Tea a dangerous habit? Women have long made a ritual of it, but in 19th century Ireland, moral reformers tried to talk them out of it. At the time, tea was considered a luxury, and taking the time to drink it was an affront to the morals of frugality and restraint.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 11:19 am

Given tea's rap today as both a popular pick-me-up and a health elixir, it's hard to imagine that sipping tea was once thought of as a reckless, suspicious act, linked to revolutionary feminism.

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Food
3:38 pm
Fri November 30, 2012

Some Restaurants In Israel Declare A Kosher Rebellion

Israelis eat at a kosher McDonald's restaurant in Tel Aviv.
David Silverman Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 8:41 am

The Carousela cafe in West Jerusalem is one of a handful of restaurants and cafes in Israel staging a bit of a rebellion by defying Jewish religious authorities who claim they are the only ones who can certify restaurants as kosher, or in compliance with Jewish dietary laws.

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Food
10:22 am
Wed November 28, 2012

Baking Without Flour For The Holidays

Nicole Spiridakis for NPR

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 8:54 am

The holidays come in on a rush of cookies and snow (if you are so lucky) and parties and lists, and suddenly it's Jan. 1 and we're wiping the crumbs away and wondering where the year went. I'm currently tiptoeing into the season, my brain still basking in Indian summer despite the rain slated to descend on San Francisco in the coming weeks. "Ready" or not, the time is upon us.

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Food
10:19 am
Wed November 28, 2012

Sandwich Monday: The Butter & Sugar Burger

Via Arbroath

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 1:34 pm

This is something that exists in Asia:

NPR still stubbornly refuses to pay for our travel β€” something about "sullying NPR's image abroad" and "Ian, how many times do we have to tell you, you don't really work here" β€” so we had to make our own version.

A disclaimer: We tried putting one together according to the specs of the image above, but no one could get down even a single bite. We lowered the butter content slightly.

Peter: I like the crunch of the sugar. It's like your teeth start decaying immediately.

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Food
8:54 am
Wed November 28, 2012

Guerilla Cartographers Put Global Food Stats On The Map

A detail of a map from Food: An Atlas that shows sources of food found at farmer's markets in Berkeley, California.
Cameron Reed Food: An Atlas

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 9:51 am

For the past five months, University of California, Berkeley cartography professor Darin Jensen has been collecting maps about food. They fill the walls of his office, each one telling a different story β€” about meat production in Maryland, about the international almond trade, about taco trucks in Oakland. Some are local, some are regional, some are global, but in a few days they'll all be bound together between the covers of Food: An Atlas.

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Food
11:21 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Why Americans Go Crazy For Pumpkin And Pumpkin-Flavored Stuff

Pumpkins for sale at the Mt. Rogers Pumpkin Patch in the a parking lot in Centreville, Va.
Paul J. Richards Getty

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 4:03 pm

At Thanksgiving, many of us will dig into the pointy tip of our first piece of pumpkin pie for the season. However, this Thursday, that nostalgic moment might feel a little less special.

This year, the word "pumpkin" seems to be creeping its way into hundreds of foods, drinks, and other products. As The Huffington Post noted recently, you can now find pumpkin-inspired beers, teas, marshmallows, soy milk, Pop-Tarts, and Pringles.

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Food
10:12 am
Mon November 26, 2012

No Innocent Spice: The Secret Story Of Nutmeg, Life And Death

This copper engraving from approximately 1700 depicts the condition of the English prisoners at the hands of the Dutch. In the 1660s, Cornell University's Eric Tagliacozzo says, the conflict and competition for the spice trade came to a head. "The Dutch decapitated a number of English merchants who were also in the Spice Islands trying to profit from the trade."
WikiCommons

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 2:42 pm

Ah, nutmeg! Whether it's sprinkled on eggnog, baked into spice cake or blended into a latte, this pungent spice can evoke memories of holidays past. We tend to link it to celebratory times.

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Food
6:31 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Real Chefs Grind It With A Mortar And Pestle

The mortar and pestle can be found in kitchens around the world, including Thailand. In the United States, chef Tanasapamon Rohman uses the tool to grind up chili paste and pulverize rice at her Thai restaurant.
Jessical Spengler Flickr

Originally published on Thu November 29, 2012 8:44 am

Chefs these days stock all sorts of high-tech tools, from liquid nitrogen to $500 blenders. But in kitchens throughout the world, there's one piece of technology that's been the same since the Stone Age: the mortar and pestle.

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Food
12:36 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Comfort And Joy: Making The 'Morning Edition' Julia Child Thanksgiving

Julia Child's reassembled Thanksgiving turkey.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 9:49 am

Like many of us who consider ourselves food adventurers most of the year, when it comes to Thanksgiving, we just want the turkey and mashed potatoes we grew up with. Well, OK, maybe just a teensy bit better than what we grew up with, but along the same lines.

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WCBE EXCLUSIVE
10:54 am
Wed November 21, 2012

Turkey Confidential Live Thanksgiving Day

On Thursday, November 22, help is on the way for Thanksgiving cooks, kitchen helpers and dinner guests on this, the biggest cooking day of the year. Lynne Rossetto Kasper will be available to answer listener questions throughout the live, two-hour program. Quickly becoming a Thanksgiving morning tradition, past shows have included everything from a cross-country trucker cooking his Thanksgiving dinner on the manifold to a panicked first-time cook who didn't realize a turkey needs to be thawed. Lynne handles all questions with wit, expertise and laughter.

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Food
4:20 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Giving Thanks For Can-Free Cooking

Peter Ogburn for NPR

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 9:21 am

I love Thanksgiving. It is the best food holiday on the calendar. However, one thing has always bothered me. Even the most accomplished cooks take unnecessary short cuts when it comes to preparing the Big Meal.

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Food
10:09 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Meet 4 African Women Who Are Changing The Face Of Coffee

Fatima Aziz Faraji is one of four women who is at the forefront of empowering women in the coffee sector.
Karen Castillo FarfΓ‘n NPR

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 3:39 pm

If you're a coffee drinker, chances are the cup of java you drank this morning was made from beans that were produced or harvested by women. Women's handprints can be found at every point in coffee production.

In fact, on family-owned coffee farms in Africa, about 70 percent of maintenance and harvesting work is done by women, according to an analysis by the International Trade Centre, but only rarely do women own the land or have financial control.

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Food
2:29 pm
Fri November 2, 2012

Christmas Comes Early For Denmark's Beer Drinkers

J-Day, the first Friday in November, marks the release of Denmark's Christmas beer, Tuborg's Julebryg. It's practically a national holiday as the beer is promoted tonight in bars throughout the country.
Tuborg

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 3:40 pm

In the U.S., Thanksgiving marks the unofficial start of the race to Christmas (unless you happen to decorate department stores, then it starts in October). But in Denmark, the Christmas race starts tonight.

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