Food

Food
3:30 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Pecan Pie Pringles

A rare photograph with a mustache in it in which the mustache is not the grossest thing.
NPR

Originally published on Mon December 9, 2013 6:32 pm

Each year around this time, Pringles comes out with a new, limited-time-only, holiday-themed flavor. A couple of years ago it was White Chocolate Peppermint Pringles, then there was Awkward Visit With Family Pringles, and now we have Pecan Pie Pringles.

Ian: Depending on where you're from, it's either pronounced "pee-kahn" or "gross."

Eva: Wait a minute ... at Thanksgiving my grandma said these were homemade!

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Food
12:21 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

'In Meat We Trust' Argues We Got The Meat Industry We Asked For

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed December 11, 2013 10:36 am

The meat on your dinner table probably didn't come from a happy little cow that lived a wondrous life out on rolling green hills. It probably also wasn't produced by a robot animal killer hired by an evil cabal of monocle-wearing industrialists.

Truth is, the meat industry is complicated, and it's impossible to understand without a whole lot of context. That's where Maureen Ogle comes in. She's a historian and the author of In Meat We Trust: An Unexpected History of Carnivore America.

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Food
8:05 am
Sat December 7, 2013

Fishery Closure Puts New England's Shrimp Season On Ice

Northern shrimp are shoveled into a holding chamber on a trawler in the Gulf of Maine in 2012. Stocks of the shrimp have been declining for several years, leading regulators to cancel the New England shrimping season.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Sat December 7, 2013 9:56 pm

New England chefs like Andrew Taylor and Mike Wiley are still coming to terms with the news: No more shrimp until further notice.

This week, regulators shut down the New England fishery for Gulf of Maine shrimp for the first time in 35 years. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission judged the stocks of the popular shrimp, also known as northern shrimp, to be dangerously low.

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Food
4:01 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

The Hills Were Alive With The Sound Of DiGiorno Pizza Last Night

Carrie Underwood may have played Maria in NBC's The Sound of Music Live, but on Twitter, it was @DiGiorno that stole the show." href="/post/hills-were-alive-sound-digiorno-pizza-last-night" class="noexit lightbox">
"DOUGH a crust, an unbaked crust ...": Carrie Underwood may have played Maria in NBC's The Sound of Music Live, but on Twitter, it was @DiGiorno that stole the show.
NBC NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri December 6, 2013 5:35 pm

When big food corporations try to horn in on Twitter conversations about TV shows and other pop culture fare, it usually doesn't work.

Remember when McDonald's tried to engage customers with the hashtag #mcdstories, only to have it turn into a way to share horror-story experiences at the fast food chain? Or when Snickers got busted for paying celebrities to tweet about its brand?

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Food
1:50 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

What Separates A Healthy And Unhealthy Diet? Just $1.50 Per Day

A Safeway customer browses in the fruit and vegetable section at Safeway in Livermore, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 9:09 am

If you want to eat a more healthful diet, you're going to have to shell out more cash, right? (After all, Whole Foods didn't get the nickname "Whole Paycheck" for nothing.)

But until recently, that widely held bit of conventional wisdom hadn't really been assessed in a rigorous, systematic way, says Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, a cardiologist and epidemiologist at the Harvard School of Public Health.

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Food
1:13 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Ketchup: The All-American Condiment That Comes From Asia

Although tomato ketchup is ubiquitous today, the condiment was once made from many diverse ingredients — walnuts, oysters or, in this instance, strawberries.
Kristen Taylor Flickr

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 12:22 pm

Each week, we take a look at a word or phrase that's caught our attention, whether for its history, usage, etymology, or just because it has an interesting story. You can see past "Word Watch" entries here.

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Weeknight Kitchen
12:13 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

Weeknight Kitchen: Crispy Cabbage with Poppy Seeds

Not another one of those same-old, same-old sauteed cabbage recipes. Here, Amy Thielen brings real verve and snappy, unexpected flavors to this trouper of a vegetable.

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Thanksgiving 2013 Programming Special
10:02 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Turkey Confidential 2013 Live

(left to right) Mario Batali, Pati Jinich, Ted Allen, Alexandra Guarnaschelli and Michael Pollan.

WCBE continues its Thanksgiving tradition with Turkey Confidential starting Thursday morning at 11am on 90.5FM! 

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Food
8:26 am
Tue November 26, 2013

If You Must Fry A Turkey, Listen To William Shatner First

Don't try this at home: Actor William Shatner in State Farm's Eat, Fry, Love: A Cautionary Remix video about how to safely fry a turkey.
State Farm

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 11:06 am

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Food
1:56 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

An Omnivore's Dilemma: Would You Eat Michael Pollan Microbe Cheese?

Microbiologist Christina Agapakis (left) and artist Sissel Tolass show off the cheese they made with bacteria from human skin. The project was part of Agapakis' graduate thesis at Harvard Medical School.
Courtesy of Grow Your Own ... Life After Nature at Science Gallery at Trinity College Dublin

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 3:03 pm

Making your own cheese and yogurt is all the rage these days. (Our friends at Kitchen Window broke down the process in a recent post, if you're curious.)

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Food
10:15 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Remember 'French Fries Cause Cancer'? Here's The Acrylamide Update

French fries: There are probably other reasons besides acrylamide to avoid these tasty snacks.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 3:02 pm

Back in 2002, french fry lovers around the world received a nasty bit of news: Those crunchy, fried strips of potato contained a known carcinogen. Now, all these years later, a new warning from the Food and Drug Administration has consumers once again puzzling over whether to fear the chemical acrylamide.

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Food
3:22 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Organic Farmers Bash FDA Restrictions On Manure Use

TK
Dan Charles/ NPR

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 3:34 pm

Many organic farmers are hopping mad at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and their reason involves perhaps the most underappreciated part of agriculture: plant food, aka fertilizer. Specifically, the FDA, as part of its overhaul of food safety regulations, wants to limit the use of animal manure.

"We think of it as the best thing in the world," says organic farmer Jim Crawford, "and they think of it as toxic and nasty and disgusting."

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Food
5:00 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

Food Stamp Cuts Leave Rural Areas, And Their Grocers, Reeling

The recent cuts in federal food benefits may be felt most in rural areas and the grocery stores that serve them.
USDA

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 6:23 pm

One recent evening, some shoppers at the Countryside Market in Belvidere, Ill., were loading up on staples, like milk and eggs. Others, like Meghan Collins, were trying to plan Thanksgiving on a newly tightened budget.

"My work has been cut," says Collins. "I'm working half the hours I used to work. So yeah, I'm making half of what I made last year."

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Food
1:50 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

Can A Fish Farm Be Organic? That's Up For Debate

Employees at Pan Fish USA, a salmon fish farm, unload fish feed on Bainbridge Island, Wash.
Ron Wurzer Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 2:34 pm

This year, Americans are expected to buy more than $30 billion worth of organic grains, produce, coffee, wine and meats.

Some producers of farmed fish want the chance to get a cut of those profits, and retailers, who can charge a premium price for organic farmed fish, are with them. But an organic label for aquaculture is not coming easy.

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Food
11:57 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Coffee Maker Cooking: Brew Up Your Next Dinner

Parallel processing: Couscous cooks in the coffee maker's carafe while broccoli and cauliflower steam in the basket.
Morgan Walker/ NPR

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 7:36 pm

A few months ago, we introduced you to the wild world of dishwasher cooking. Poach salmon while cleaning dirty plates? No problem.

But some of you expressed concerns about having your sockeye sit so close to soapy water and the high energy cost of running a dishwasher.

Well, we've stumbled upon another wacky cooking method that may overcome these issues: using your coffee maker.

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Weeknight Kitchen
11:48 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Weeknight Kitchen: Herbed Meat Kebabs

This week's recipe for Herbed Meat Kebabs from Einat Admony's new book Balaboosta is a good reminder of the Middle East's tradition of spicing up ground meat. 

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Weeknight Kitchen
11:43 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Weeknight Kitchen: Cream of Tomato Soup, Grilled Cheese, Fougasse

Leaves are falling, temperatures are dipping, and it's the right time to get a bubbling pot of soup going on the stove. 

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Weeknight Kitchen
11:30 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Weeknight Kitchen: Tomato, Feta and Red Pepper Cazuela

Warm up some flatbread, toss up a simple green salad and tuck into this Tomato, Feta and Red Pepper Cazuela tonight.

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Food
11:08 am
Mon November 18, 2013

'Anything That Moves' Explores America's Extreme Food Culture

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 4:20 pm

Author Dana Goodyear has spent a lot of time dining with foodies who champion bugs as a meal. And horses. And brains. Whales. Leaves. Weeds. Ash. Hay. Even plain dirt.

Goodyear, a staff writer for The New Yorker, set out to document the outer bounds of the extreme food culture that has taken hold among American foodies. Their quest for ever more exotic, challenging ingredients, she says, is raising fundamental questions about the nature of food itself and the assumptions that underlie what we view as acceptable to eat.

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Food
11:01 am
Mon November 18, 2013

MSG, Seasoned For A Comeback

According to legend, Japanese chemist Kikunae Ikeda discovered the food additive monosodium glutamate in 1908 after contemplating the meaty flavor of seaweed soup.
Jung K Oh iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:20 pm

Umami, that savory fifth taste — in addition to bitter, sour, sweet and salty — has become a sought-after flavor in the culinary scene.

Not quite so beloved is the umami additive monosodium glutamate — MSG, as it's more popularly known. For decades it's been vilified, maligned and, some say, misunderstood.

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