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Health

Health

The results of an IQ test can depend on the gender of the person who's conducting the test. Likewise, studies of pain medication can be completely thrown off by the gender of the experimenter. This underappreciated problem is one reason that some scientific findings don't stand the test of time.

A new study published in the journal Health Affairs reports that states that rejected the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion had a significant increase in hospital closures.

Contaminated food is taking too long to be removed from store shelves, according to a report issued by the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services.

The report says the Food and Drug Administration "did not always have an efficient and effective food-recall process that ensured the safety of the nation's food supply."

Federal investigators reviewed 30 of 1,557 food recalls between 2012 and 2015.

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Rethinking Medicine.

About Siddhartha Mukherjee's TED Talk

When it comes to medicine, one rule of thinking has generally prevailed: Have disease, take pill, kill something. But physician Siddhartha Mukherjee says treatment should take a broader approach.

About Siddhartha Mukherjee

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Rethinking Medicine.

About Jocelyne Bloch's TED Talk

Neurosurgeon Jocelyne Bloch and her colleague were studying brain samples of head trauma patients when they made an amazing discovery — brain cells with the ability to generate new cells.

About Jocelyne Bloch

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Rethinking Medicine.

About Joseph Ravenell's TED Talk

Many black men trust their barber more than their primary care doctor, if they even have one. Physician Joseph Ravenell wants to turn barbershops into a place where men can access basic health care.

About Atul Gawande

A day after President Trump said the Affordable Care Act "has been repealed," officials reported that 8.8 million Americans have signed up for coverage on the federal insurance exchange for 2018 — nearly reaching the 2017 number in half the sign-up time.

That total is far from complete. Enrollment is still open in parts of seven states, including Florida and Texas, that use the federal HealthCare.gov exchange but were affected by hurricanes earlier this year.

Facebook admitted Friday that spending too much time on the social media site could have a negative effect on users’ health. The post came ahead of Facebook’s midyear transparency report, which revealed an increase in government requests and an update to its publishing guidelines.

The Food and Drug Administration Tuesday approved the first gene therapy to treat an inherited disease.

The treatment is called Luxturna, a genetically modified virus that ferries a healthy gene into the eyes of patients born with retinal dystrophy, a rare condition that destroys cells in the retina needed for healthy vision.

A new study found that teenagers are increasingly depressed, feel hopeless and are more likely to consider suicide. Researchers found a sudden increase in teens' symptoms of depression, suicide risk factors and suicide rates in 2012 — around the time when smartphones became popular, says Jean Twenge, one of the authors of the study.

Debra Thompson is throwing a block party. She has good weather for it — never a sure thing in Chicago — a warm and sunny autumn afternoon. Music is playing, hot dogs are grilling.

But this party isn't just for fun. Thompson is the volunteer chairwoman of Englewood Village, an organization that connects low-income older adults on the city's South Side with services from nutrition to job assistance to home repair. And this is how she is reaching out to potential new members.

Research shows women veterans don’t use VA health care at the same rate as men, and many report delayed or unmet health needs. A group of nonprofits is testing a new program in Los Angeles meant to overcome the barriers that keep female veterans from seeking help.

Libby Denkmann (@libdenk) of KPCC reports.

It may not be rocket science, but a group of surgeons at the University of Michigan has devised an approach to help curb the nation's opioid epidemic — starting at their own hospital.

CVS is one of the biggest companies in the U.S., and it’s about to get even bigger through a planned acquisition of the health insurance company Aetna.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Michael Regan (@Reganonymous) of Bloomberg News about what the merger means for the companies, and for consumers, at a time when the U.S. health care system is changing.

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Transparency.

About Leilani Schweitzer's TED Talk

The Face Of Hepatitis C Is Getting Younger

Dec 2, 2017

Three-quarters of all chronic hepatitis C cases in the U.S afflict people over 50. But in recent years, new infections have tripled among people in their 20s. Health officials call it a side effect of the opioid epidemic.

For a long time, the residents of Acre State in Brazil were lucky.

They lived in the right climate for the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which carries dengue fever. But that mosquito was nowhere to be found, and there were no recorded cases of dengue in the state.

Eli Wheatley and Christian Guardino are among a growing number of patients whose lives are apparently being saved or radically improved by gene therapy.

Wheatley, 3, of Lebanon, Ky., and Guardino, 17, of Patchogue, N.Y., were both diagnosed with what were long thought to be incurable genetic disorders. In the past, Wheatley's condition would have probably killed him before his first birthday. Guardino's would have blinded him early in life.

But after receiving experimental gene therapies, both seem to be doing fine.

Women are more likely to have asthma than men, and though sex hormones have been suspected as one reason why, just how they might be affecting asthma risk has been something of a mystery.

Virginia is among several states warning families that children may soon lose their health care coverage under the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Money has been running out for CHIP since Congress failed to reauthorize federal funding for the program when it expired in September.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Linda Nablo, chief deputy director at Virginia’s Department of Medical Assistance Services.

A new antipsychotic pill contains an ingestible sensor which can transmit information to the patient’s doctor. The pill is designed to help patients take medication consistently, but it also raises some privacy concerns.

Digital Pill Will Keep Tabs On Patients

Nov 15, 2017

Digital pills that report from inside your body on what you’ve taken and when. They’re approved. Where does this go?

We’ll also talk this hour about the GOP plan to repeal Obamacare’s individual mandate.

This show airs Wednesday at 10 a.m. EST. 

In August, a doctor in Spain posted x-ray and microscopic pictures from a man's thigh on Twitter, asking for help.

The physician was concerned that he had cancer.

Last year, doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital for Children were confronted with a difficult decision. It involved a pair of conjoined, 2-year-old twin girls. One was in failing health and if she died, her death would kill her healthier sister. But operating to separate them would lead to the death of the sick twin — she wouldn’t be able to survive on her own.

A New Use For Polytrauma Treatment

Nov 13, 2017

Treating American service members wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has caused a new military emphasis on polytrauma, a medical term meaning more than one serious injury.

The lessons learned from treating those complex wounds demanded a new model of care that today is helping veterans and active-duty military heal — whether they have seen combat or not. Wendy Rigby (@TPRWendy) from Texas Public Radio has the story.

The day Dr. Roberto Montenegro finished his Ph.D. was memorable. But not for the right reasons.

"I still cringe when I think about it," says Montenegro.

It had started well. His colleagues at UCLA had taken him and his girlfriend (now wife) out to a fancy restaurant to celebrate.

Hundreds of people around the country are still suffering from complications linked to injections of tainted medicine produced at a Massachusetts pharmacy in 2012.

A nationwide outbreak of fungal infections was tied to the shipment of nearly 18,000 contaminated vials of preservative-free methylprednisolone, a steroid, made by the New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Mass.

It's hard for Zachary Lane to wake up in time for school every day.

"I have four alarms set and it still takes me a long time to wake me up," says Lane, a 17-year-old high school junior in Zionsville, Ind.

He says he regularly gets detention for being tardy. "I get to school and I'm talked to like I'm attempting to skip school — like I'm attempting to be truant," he says. "I feel terrible. It's awful."

And when Lane does make it to class on time, he has a hard time focusing.

"I feel kind of like lagging behind myself," he says. "I don't feel totally there."

Public health authorities and infectious disease specialists now say we may not be able to rid the U.S. of the Zika virus. Despite months of intense work — including house to house inspections and aggressive mosquito control — federal, state and local officials have not been able to stop the spread of Zika in Miami.

Yana Shapiro is a partner at a Philadelphia law firm with an exhausting travel schedule and two boys, ages 9 and 4. When she feels run-down from juggling everything and feels a cold coming on, she books an appointment for an intravenous infusion of water, vitamins and minerals.

"Anything to avoid antibiotics or being out of commission," the 37-year-old says.

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