WCBE

Literature

Literature

Thrillers have a long, honored tradition of turning germs into monsters. But from Michael Crichton's The Andromeda Strain on up, such novels have speculated about microorganisms in a way that pales compared to the monstrosities that humans inflict on each other — especially when faced with the threat of lethal infection, one of the most primal fears we have. Dana I. Wolff — also known as mystery author J.E. Fishman — toys with this dynamic in his new novel The Prisoner of Hell Gate.

On this week’s Shelf Discovery, Kristin learns about literature with some unlikely scholars in Mikita Brottman’s The Maximum Security Book Club.

Title: The Maximum Security Book Club

Author: Mikita Brottman

Pages: 228

Publisher: Harper

ISBN: 978-0062384331

And read Kristin's full review on NightsAndWeekends.com.

Nicole Dennis-Benn's debut novel takes readers to a Jamaica that tourists rarely visit. "This is no paradise. At least not for us," she writes.

The characters in Here Comes the Sun are working-class women. They struggle with money, sexuality and the pressures of tourism squeezing their small community of River Bank.

A few weeks ago, I went back to the federal prison in Seagoville, Texas, for another conversation with Edgar Diaz.

'The Big Sheep' Plays Hardboiled Sci-Fi To The Hilt

Jun 29, 2016

It's not hard to parse the two main influences on Robert Kroese's new novel The Big Sheep. The title itself mashes them up: Raymond Chandler's 1939 hardboiled masterpiece The Big Sleep and Philip K. Dick's 1968 post-apocalyptic classic Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (the basis of the film Blade Runner). The question is: Does Kroese's book transcend the obviousness of that literary portmanteau? Thankfully, yes.

In Persona, Genevieve Valentine introduced us to a world in which diplomats are celebrities on the covers of glossy magazines, and in which paparazzi wage a guerilla war against the status quo by ruffling the smooth, sanctioned narratives of the International Assembly with candid shots obtained through illegal surveillance.

On this week’s Shelf Discovery, Kristin seeks out family with a crime boss and a wannabe gangster in the latest Justice novel, Dead End Fix, by T. E. Woods.

Title: Dead End Fix (Justice Novel #6)

Author: T. E. Woods

Pages: 290

Publisher: Alibi

AISN: B018CHA304

And read Kristin's full review on NightsAndWeekends.com.

The Toast — funny and literary feminist website, gleeful kneecapper of high culture, omphalos of cheerful misandry, and habitat of the rare courteous and informative comments section — is closing.

"No matter how long they've been there, the people who live out here believe that whatever life demands of them they can meet it on their own," writes Larry Watson in his new novel, As Good as Gone. "Here" is the badlands of eastern Montana, a famously desolate and unforgiving region; those who inhabit it tend to learn self-reliance quickly, and by necessity.

Despite its ever-controversial sexism, The Taming of the Shrew remains one of Shakespeare's most popular comedies — in both the original and its many modern adaptations, including Cole Porter's Kiss Me Kate. And now Anne Tyler, as part of the Hogarth Shakespeare series of novels based on the major plays, has tamed the Bard's shrewish battle of the sexes into a far more politically correct screwball comedy of manners that actually channels Jane Austen more than Shakespeare. It's clear that she had fun with Vinegar Girl, and readers will too.

On this week’s Shelf Discovery, Kristin tracks down a stalker with a team of bodyguards in the audio edition of Always Watching by Lynette Eason.

Title: Always Watching (Elite Guardians #1)

Author: Lynette Eason

Runtime: 8 hours, 31 minutes

Publisher: Tantor Audio

AISN: B01AWZ6YS4

And read Kristin's full review on NightsAndWeekends.com.

The mechanics of DC Comics' latest relaunch of its superhero line — precisely which books are returning to their original numbering, and the fact that several titles will now be published twice monthly, etc. — have engendered much discussion among retailers and collectors.

But let's talk big picture.

It is a truth universally acknowledged that superhero universes periodically reshuffle their narrative decks. The in-story explanations differ in often tortuous ways, but the only true driver is sales. Or, rather, a lack of them.

Before we even begin to talk about Naomi Novik's beloved alt-history/fantasy Temeraire series — which concludes this month with League of Dragons — we have to look at the numbers. The first book in the series, Her Majesty's Dragon, came out in 2006. League of Dragons is the ninth. That means over the past ten years, Novik has written upwards of 3,500 pages of the Temeraire series, which at this point probably ought to be called a saga.

On this week’s Shelf Discovery, Kristin relives the days leading up to a widely-reported tragedy with Noah Hawley’s Before the Fall.

Title: Before the Fall

Author: Noah Hawley

Pages: 349

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

ISBN: 978-1455561780

And read Kristin's full review on NightsAndWeekends.com.

Ren Warom's Escapology is a loud book. It thumps and howls and whistles and squirms. It's a twitchy thing — won't sit still for a second. It makes no sense sometimes. It's derivative and odd, big and intimate at the same time, clunky and uneven and trope-heavy and manages to be both 2016 post-genre original and totally late '80s cyberpunk samizdat page to page, sometimes line to line.

Science fiction is known for speculating on technology, but it's always been just as passionate about politics. From Philip K.

On this week’s Shelf Discovery, Kristin returns to fairy tale land with a couple of modern-day kids in author Sarah Mlynowski’s If the Shoe Fits

Title: If the Shoe Fits (Whatever After #2)

Author: Sarah Mlynowski

Runtime: 3 hours, 10 minutes

Publisher: Scholastic Audio

AISN: B00HZ7GAIW

And read Kristin's full review on NightsAndWeekends.com.

What is it with poets and birds? Edgar Allan Poe had his raven. Ted Hughes had his crow. Wallace Stevens his blackbird. Keats his nightingale. Helen MacDonald her hawk. For Emily Dickinson, hope was the thing with feathers.

'Possession' Charts The Tangled Paths Of Art And Antiquities

Jun 1, 2016

"Antiquities have rough afterlives."

The Koh i Noor diamond is back in the news this spring, including a telling quote about it from 2010, when Prime Minister David Cameron explained his decision not to return the diamond: "If you say yes to one you suddenly find the British Museum would be empty."

On this week’s Shelf Discovery, Kristin hits the campaign trail with Matthew S. Hiley’s outrageous political farce The Candidates.

Title: The Candidates

Author: Matthew S. Hiley

Pages: 193

Publisher: Greenleaf Book Group Press

ISBN: 978-1626342682

And read Kristin's full review on NightsAndWeekends.com.

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