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Poverty

Ohio Public Radio

 Fifty years ago, Martin Luther King Junior advocated for Americans living in poverty in what was called the "Poor People's Campaign." 

oacaa.org

A group that advocates for low-income Ohioans has issued its annual report on poverty in the state.  

A new report shows poverty in Ohio is declining and economic opportunity is rising.

According to the World Bank, if you're living on $1.90 a day or less, you're living in extreme poverty.

The 767 million people in that category have $1.90 a day or less in purchasing power to fulfill their daily needs.

Most of that money goes for food – only it may not be enough to purchase nutritious food or to stave off hunger. Hundreds of millions of the extreme poor are malnourished.

Their housing may be of low quality. And they may not have enough money for school fees (primary education isn't always free) or health-care expenses.

Ohio United Way

An Ohio United Way report reveals that 40% of the state’s households lack enough income to afford basic needs. Details of the nearly 300-page analysis were discussed at Wednesday’s Columbus Metropolitan Club forum. 

A new study by Ohio United Way shows 40 percent of Ohio households are struggling to come up with enough resources to provide basic necessities.

Newly released U.S. Census Bureau data shows median income rose slightly, while poverty rates and the number of people without health insurance in Franklin County and the state declined from 2015 to 2016.

Thoughtwell, previously known as Community Research Partners, unveiled the results of a comprehensive needs assessment for youth in Franklin County at Wednesday's Columbus Metropolitan Club forum.

alexiafoundation.org

A new report by the Children's Defense Fund of Ohio shows little improvement for low-income Appalachian children.

Sixteen percent of Ohioans lived in poverty last year, and nearly a third were under the federal poverty line for at least a portion of of 2015.

The U.S. Census Bureau has released figures on the number of Ohioans living in poverty.

A recent analysis of the average amount of money Ohio schools spend per student shows rural and urban districts have to stretch their dollars further than their suburban counterparts. 

Slight Increase In Ohio Poverty

Sep 19, 2013

New U.S. Census Bureau figures show 16.3 percent of Ohioans, or 1.8 million people, were in poverty last year, up one tenth from 2011.

The Children's Defense Fund of Ohio says nearly 27 percent of Franklin County children lived in poverty in 2011, and 34 percent received food stamps.